Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

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verbose
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Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by verbose » Mon Nov 14, 2016 7:31 pm

I'm having severe difficulty coping with LED headlights. The end of daylight saving time has made it clear how many more cars have LED lights than last winter.

I am considering giving up night driving, except that I literally cannot do so. I have no alternative. There is no way that I am a safe driver--I can't see. I really can't see. At least I'm slow, but often so slow that other cars are crazily getting around me.

Does anyone know of products or strategies used to dim other people's lights? I have problems when they are oncoming, behind me, beside me, and even on the other side of a divided highway. My rear view mirror on dim setting is no longer dim enough. My side mirrors are so full of glare I can hardly look at them. I have a 2008 Honda Civic. Sunglasses help but they greatly diminish my ability to see unlit obstacles.

As much as I love my car (and I do), would a newer and/or taller vehicle do better with other car's headlights? I don't want a large vehicle, but I wonder.

hicabob
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by hicabob » Mon Nov 14, 2016 7:37 pm

It's probably HID headlights that bother you. Led headlights are still unusual. Auto dimming mirrors are nice, come on most new cars, and I believe can be retroactively installed. Wearing sunglassses at night is not a good solution. My Mom's night vision improved after she had cataract surgery which the docs seem to have down very well as a procedure these days. I've learned that a symptom of needing it is seeing "halos" around lights at night.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by ResearchMed » Mon Nov 14, 2016 7:49 pm

verbose wrote:I'm having severe difficulty coping with LED headlights. The end of daylight saving time has made it clear how many more cars have LED lights than last winter.

I am considering giving up night driving, except that I literally cannot do so. I have no alternative. There is no way that I am a safe driver--I can't see. I really can't see. At least I'm slow, but often so slow that other cars are crazily getting around me.

Does anyone know of products or strategies used to dim other people's lights? I have problems when they are oncoming, behind me, beside me, and even on the other side of a divided highway. My rear view mirror on dim setting is no longer dim enough. My side mirrors are so full of glare I can hardly look at them. I have a 2008 Honda Civic. Sunglasses help but they greatly diminish my ability to see unlit obstacles.

As much as I love my car (and I do), would a newer and/or taller vehicle do better with other car's headlights? I don't want a large vehicle, but I wonder.
Have you seen an ophthalmologist?

I had this happen about 3 years ago, although I can't be sure that my vision problem when driving at night was the same as yours.

It was happening over a small amount of tme, and then suddenly, I couldn't see at all (not at all!) when a car was approaching at night.
I refused to drive at night, and only went out then if DH could drive me.

It turned out that I had cataracts - who knew!?

After the surgery (I was very scared, but each was a big nothing), the first thing I saw when I opened the first eye with the surgery was...
TECHNICOLOR!
I had no idea how the colors had "faded".
It was like Wizard of Oz, with B&W in one eye, and vivid colors in the other.
I immediately bumped up the date for the second eye :happy

Even if it isn't cataracts, you should see a physician to be sure it isn't "something else medical".

Good luck.

RM
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by Ron » Mon Nov 14, 2016 7:54 pm

You may want to have your eyes checked. Many years ago I had the same problem with night driving, getting progressively worse over the years. An exam revealed that I had cataracts, but my vision during the day was unaffected.

One eye was done immediately (lens replaced); the other a decade later. A decade after the second operation, I can still drive at night with no problem, even though there are a lot of HID and LED lights as standard equipment than when I first recognized I had a problem.

FWIW,

- Ron

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by randomguy » Mon Nov 14, 2016 8:34 pm

There are lenses coatings that claim to help with starbust and various glare issues. Definitely an issue to bring up with your eye doctor next time your in.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by squirm » Mon Nov 14, 2016 8:35 pm

LED lights on pickups and trucks is insanely bright. I can't believe it's legal.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by verbose » Mon Nov 14, 2016 9:19 pm

I will look into auto-dimming mirrors. My husband's car has those, I can drive it a bit to test it out, as long as I don't ruin the clutch.

I am in my mid-40's and have a long history of light sensitivity and migraines. It's unlikely to be cataracts. My vision hasn't changed--headlights changed. Several years ago, I asked an ophthalmologist about night driving and she had no suggestions. I can remember first learning to drive at night in the 1990's, being blinded by conventional headlights. It was terrifying but I eventually mastered it. Being older now, I'm not sure if I will adapt again.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by dbr » Mon Nov 14, 2016 9:32 pm

Aside from cataracts finding some solution to overly bright incoming headlights is eventually going to surface as an issue, no doubt about it.

On a related note, there are communities now where citizens are launching complaints at the city public works departments for too bright LED street lights.

mhalley
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by mhalley » Mon Nov 14, 2016 9:38 pm

How about those yellow sunglasses advertised on tv? Certainly a vision check wouldn't hurt, people do rarely get cataracts before becoming a senior.
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_c ... PTR6PFQTPZ
Upon doing a little more googling, these apparently are not that good. A better solutions is an anti-reflective coating on your regipular glasses.
http://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/ho ... fter-dark/
And here is a aaafoundation brosure on it.
https://www.aaafoundation.org/sites/def ... ochure.pdf
Last edited by mhalley on Mon Nov 14, 2016 9:58 pm, edited 2 times in total.

carguyny
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by carguyny » Mon Nov 14, 2016 9:47 pm

LED lights aren't any brighter in the US due to DoT regulations - a few car people will change to EU lights or have the ECU reprogrammed but it's very few people doing this. As others have suggested, if it is a year on year change a vision test is probably a good options.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by lightheir » Mon Nov 14, 2016 9:56 pm

You're probably doing this already, but you can start by tilting your rearview mirror to only see the reflected glare of the cars behind you, and then turn your sideview mirror to point more downward just out of direct view of your sight so rear casr don't blind you there.

I can't suggest anything for the front facing cars.

If it makes you feel any better, I have perfectly good night vision, good young man reflexes, and I'm still very wary of missing cars in my blind spot and elsewhere due to the glare of all the headlights.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by Elemental » Mon Nov 14, 2016 10:02 pm

I'm right there with you. I think brake lights are just as bad too. I roll up to a stop light and get blinded by the super-bright LED brake lights in front of me. It blinds me as bad as the super-bright headlights and the super-bright billboards. I think I need to sell my car and get something taller to help with the headlights. I don't know if it will help with taillights (much closer) or billboards (I'm not sure anything will help with those).

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by squirm » Mon Nov 14, 2016 10:07 pm

carguyny wrote:LED lights aren't any brighter in the US due to DoT regulations - a few car people will change to EU lights or have the ECU reprogrammed but it's very few people doing this. As others have suggested, if it is a year on year change a vision test is probably a good options.
To me they seem way brighter, perhaps because of CRI, but doesn't matter...they're too bright, IMO.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by TxAg » Mon Nov 14, 2016 10:15 pm

Based on your replies here, it may be unsafe for you to drive at night. I don't want to sound insensitive but if you are light sensistive and drive so slow that others speedily pass you by, you may be a danger on the road. Best of luck to you. I hope you find a solution.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by rob » Mon Nov 14, 2016 10:19 pm

squirm wrote:
carguyny wrote:LED lights aren't any brighter in the US due to DoT regulations - a few car people will change to EU lights or have the ECU reprogrammed but it's very few people doing this. As others have suggested, if it is a year on year change a vision test is probably a good options.
To me they seem way brighter, perhaps because of CRI, but doesn't matter...they're too bright, IMO.
Part of the issue is so many large & high cars but the bright white HID lights are far harder to drive into. You can see most new cars do not tilt like older cars... you can see the light arc on the wrong side of the road. While it MIGHT be the eyes of the OP, it's getting worse quickly and is an arms race of sorts. At some point, I will "upgrade" my lights so I can try and see thru the bright light of others. It's not a way to win friends but I whack some of the egregious ones with high beam because I'm just sick of it.
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by dbr » Mon Nov 14, 2016 10:33 pm

It is a fair statement that as we age driving at night can become more difficult and we should take that into account.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by White Coat Investor » Mon Nov 14, 2016 11:32 pm

dbr wrote:It is a fair statement that as we age driving at night can become more difficult and we should take that into account.
Don't be prejudiced. 92 year olds see and drive just as well as 60 year olds. :) (I got chewed out on another thread for making a similar statement.)
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by jesscj » Mon Nov 14, 2016 11:47 pm

I wear yellow tinted glasses while cycling when its dark out not sure if its just me but feel I can see better at night with yellow tinted glasses. I've thought about keeping a pair in the car for night driving as well.
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by scotthal » Mon Nov 14, 2016 11:58 pm

Color temp on HID and LED headlights tilt much further towards the blue end of the spectrum than the older incandescent tech. Yellow tinted glasses should reduce glare - improving your comfort level without doing much damage to overall visibility.
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by dbr » Tue Nov 15, 2016 8:26 am

White Coat Investor wrote:
dbr wrote:It is a fair statement that as we age driving at night can become more difficult and we should take that into account.
Don't be prejudiced. 92 year olds see and drive just as well as 60 year olds. :) (I got chewed out on another thread for making a similar statement.)
Sounds like that is a topic that deserves some further investigation. Thanks for the input.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by lthenderson » Tue Nov 15, 2016 9:10 am

verbose wrote:IDoes anyone know of products or strategies used to dim other people's lights?
I bright light them back until they dim their lights. I recently spent two months driving 80 miles a day in the dark and on average, about one out of every three cars forgot to dim their lights. I live out in a rural area where you may go a few minutes between oncoming cars so this may not be applicable in cities but I was appalled at how lazy/bad drivers are becoming.

verbose wrote:I have a 2008 Honda Civic.
I have a 1997 Honda Civic and that is part of the problem. It sits too low, especially with a pickup behind you even with their lights are on dim. When driving my wife's RAV4, which sits up much higher and has auto dimming rearview mirror, I don't have nearly as much problems with the lights (still get people leaving on their brights though) as I do in my car. Having an extra foot or so of head height really helps with the brightness of lights of cars behind you, especially when they are tailgaiting. A RAV4 isn't too much bigger of a footprint than a Civic so I would seriously consider getting a taller vehicle.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by jf89 » Tue Nov 15, 2016 9:21 am

verbose wrote:I'm having severe difficulty coping with LED headlights. The end of daylight saving time has made it clear how many more cars have LED lights than last winter.

I am considering giving up night driving, except that I literally cannot do so. I have no alternative. There is no way that I am a safe driver--I can't see. I really can't see. At least I'm slow, but often so slow that other cars are crazily getting around me.

Does anyone know of products or strategies used to dim other people's lights? I have problems when they are oncoming, behind me, beside me, and even on the other side of a divided highway. My rear view mirror on dim setting is no longer dim enough. My side mirrors are so full of glare I can hardly look at them. I have a 2008 Honda Civic. Sunglasses help but they greatly diminish my ability to see unlit obstacles.

As much as I love my car (and I do), would a newer and/or taller vehicle do better with other car's headlights? I don't want a large vehicle, but I wonder.
Just wanted to jump in quickly with a few things:

1) Your problem probably isn't that the LED lights are brighter. They are, but the problem is more likely that they were installed incorrectly and do not aim down at the correct angle and are instead aimed up more like high beams or "brights". This is a problem for those of us with lower cars more than truck and SUV drivers. If the problem becomes so bad that you literally cannot drive, perhaps a vehicle that sits up a bit more would be better.

2) Studies regularly show that people driving 10 MPH below the speed limit are a much larger hazard than drivers going 10 mph over the speed limit. Try to speed up a bit.

3) Beside you? Maybe your vision is going downhill. See an optometrist. Even if you don't require corrective lenses all the time, poor night vision is a real thing or they may be able to suggest some sort of glare resistant lenses or minor shading to a pair of sunglasses.
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by Mudpuppy » Tue Nov 15, 2016 1:25 pm

verbose wrote:Does anyone know of products or strategies used to dim other people's lights? I have problems when they are oncoming, behind me, beside me, and even on the other side of a divided highway. My rear view mirror on dim setting is no longer dim enough. My side mirrors are so full of glare I can hardly look at them. I have a 2008 Honda Civic. Sunglasses help but they greatly diminish my ability to see unlit obstacles.
Besides the copious recommendations to see an eye doctor, you need to adjust your mirrors. If the side mirrors are causing glare from passing vehicles, they're a little bit out of alignment and you should tilt them down or up a smidgen. If the side mirrors are causing glare from vehicles behind you, they are majorly out of alignment and you need to tilt them out significantly.

The side mirrors should not show any of your car in them when they are properly adjusted side-to-side. Adjusting your mirrors will not only cut down on glare, it will also reduce your blind spot. Safety starts with proper mirror adjustment (which is a lesson my dad made sure we learned when learning to drive). Read this article for more information: http://www.caranddriver.com/features/ho ... lind-spots

Another trick my dad taught me for dealing with bright oncoming headlights, like someone who forgot to turn off their high beams, is to look to the right until the car passes (e.g. look to the line to the right of your car). As long as your peripheral vision is good, this reduces the direct effect of the glare while still allowing you to see the roadway. Of course, if your peripheral vision is bad, don't do this.

But do please go get your eyes checked. Even if you've always been bright-light sensitive (and I get triggered into ocular migraines from certain light sources, so I certainly understand this issue), a sudden change in light sensitivity can be a sign of something else going on. It only costs an exam fee to get things checked, which is a small price to pay for safety. And even if your eyes are healthy, the eye doctor should know of further techniques to mitigate the glare.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by Doom&Gloom » Tue Nov 15, 2016 1:42 pm

Mudpuppy wrote:
verbose wrote:Does anyone know of products or strategies used to dim other people's lights? I have problems when they are oncoming, behind me, beside me, and even on the other side of a divided highway. My rear view mirror on dim setting is no longer dim enough. My side mirrors are so full of glare I can hardly look at them. I have a 2008 Honda Civic. Sunglasses help but they greatly diminish my ability to see unlit obstacles.
Besides the copious recommendations to see an eye doctor, you need to adjust your mirrors. If the side mirrors are causing glare from passing vehicles, they're a little bit out of alignment and you should tilt them down or up a smidgen. If the side mirrors are causing glare from vehicles behind you, they are majorly out of alignment and you need to tilt them out significantly.

The side mirrors should not show any of your car in them when they are properly adjusted side-to-side. Adjusting your mirrors will not only cut down on glare, it will also reduce your blind spot. Safety starts with proper mirror adjustment (which is a lesson my dad made sure we learned when learning to drive). Read this article for more information: http://www.caranddriver.com/features/ho ... lind-spots

Another trick my dad taught me for dealing with bright oncoming headlights, like someone who forgot to turn off their high beams, is to look to the right until the car passes (e.g. look to the line to the right of your car). As long as your peripheral vision is good, this reduces the direct effect of the glare while still allowing you to see the roadway. Of course, if your peripheral vision is bad, don't do this.

But do please go get your eyes checked. Even if you've always been bright-light sensitive (and I get triggered into ocular migraines from certain light sources, so I certainly understand this issue), a sudden change in light sensitivity can be a sign of something else going on. It only costs an exam fee to get things checked, which is a small price to pay for safety. And even if your eyes are healthy, the eye doctor should know of further techniques to mitigate the glare.
Another version of the bolded is to close one eye until the offending vehicle passes.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by David Jay » Tue Nov 15, 2016 1:50 pm

White Coat Investor wrote:
dbr wrote:It is a fair statement that as we age driving at night can become more difficult and we should take that into account.
Don't be prejudiced. 92 year olds see and drive just as well as 60 year olds. :) (I got chewed out on another thread for making a similar statement.)
Don't worry, doc. I'm sure your problem is just a little bit of cognitive decline...
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by jdb » Tue Nov 15, 2016 3:48 pm

Mudpuppy wrote:
Another trick my dad taught me for dealing with bright oncoming headlights, like someone who forgot to turn off their high beams, is to look to the right until the car passes (e.g. look to the line to the right of your car). As long as your peripheral vision is good, this reduces the direct effect of the glare while still allowing you to see the roadway. Of course, if your peripheral vision is bad, don't do this.
This old driving trick works for any bad visibility situations, whether fog, heavy rain or snow, or bright oncoming headlights, I have done it for many years. I tend to look down at lane dividers on left (driver's side) illuminated by my headlights. At least keeps you in proper lane. But do need peripheral vision for it to work well. Good luck.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by TareNeko » Tue Nov 15, 2016 4:02 pm

Make sure that your windows are clean both inside and outside. I have a little squeegee that I use to wipe rain drops from all windows before I start driving. Also, the inside of your windshield should be spotless (no cloudy marks).

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by nisiprius » Tue Nov 15, 2016 4:10 pm

Do yellow-tinted glasses actually help at night? If so, why would this be? Does the slight cataract that is normal in older eyes fluoresce from the short wavelengths in the bluish headlights?

No, yellow lenses don't help. I got many Google hits on convincing web pages which say it is hokum.

The Dangers of Night Driving Glasses quotes a book entitled Forensic Aspects of Vision and Highway Safety:
Yellow 'Night Driving' lenses have been shown to provide no benefit in seeing ability at night. They are even hazardous, because they give the driver a feeling of seeing better, which no one has yet been able to explain. Studies have shown that they actually impair visual performance and retard glare recovery. Many promoters have made unfounded claims for the ability of amber to improve night vision. They have employed mass solicitation, usually by mail. The Federal Trade Commission has correctly ruled that such practices are illegal since the lenses do not perform as claimed.
This site and other recommend clear lenses with an AR coating.
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by bubbadog » Tue Nov 15, 2016 5:26 pm

jf89 recommended that the driver who cannot see at night speed up. Not sure I can get behind that suggestion. Wow!

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by dbr » Tue Nov 15, 2016 7:48 pm

bubbadog wrote:jf89 recommended that the driver who cannot see at night speed up. Not sure I can get behind that suggestion. Wow!
Yes, indeed. But I think it was meant as a reminder that slowing down is not a great idea either if it makes that driver an outlier relative to the normal traffic speed. The better suggestion if there is a severe problem is to see what is wrong with the vision and to not drive at night if at all possible.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by clip651 » Tue Nov 15, 2016 7:59 pm

verbose wrote:I'm having severe difficulty coping with LED headlights. The end of daylight saving time has made it clear how many more cars have LED lights than last winter.

I am considering giving up night driving, except that I literally cannot do so. I have no alternative. There is no way that I am a safe driver--I can't see. I really can't see. At least I'm slow, but often so slow that other cars are crazily getting around me.
Until or unless you find a solution, please find a way to stay off the roads at night. I don't want to be driving anywhere near someone who "really can't see" and neither does anyone else. You are a danger to yourself and others at night. Best wishes in finding a solution.

cj

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by kashmoney » Tue Nov 15, 2016 8:13 pm

What about getting your windows tinted?

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by spammagnet » Tue Nov 15, 2016 9:47 pm

TareNeko wrote:... the inside of your windshield should be spotless (no cloudy marks).
This can make a huge difference. Unfortunately, I find the contortions necessary to clean the interior of the windshield and rear window very uncomfortable, and rarely do it property.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by RudyS » Tue Nov 15, 2016 10:16 pm

I was having problems with glare at night, especially in the rain. Really cut down on night-time driving. Finally got rid of the cloudy lenses (in my eyes) - cataract surgery. Did wonders! I'm astounded this thread is still here, but please go get your eyes checked out professionally and ascertain just what the problem is.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by TX_TURTLE » Tue Nov 15, 2016 10:41 pm

verbose wrote:I will look into auto-dimming mirrors. My husband's car has those, I can drive it a bit to test it out, as long as I don't ruin the clutch.

I am in my mid-40's and have a long history of light sensitivity and migraines. It's unlikely to be cataracts. My vision hasn't changed--headlights changed. Several years ago, I asked an ophthalmologist about night driving and she had no suggestions. I can remember first learning to drive at night in the 1990's, being blinded by conventional headlights. It was terrifying but I eventually mastered it. Being older now, I'm not sure if I will adapt again.
Some people develop cataracts earlier than most, and the problems you describe may be related. There are other conditions that may impact your night vision, such as astigmatism. Regardless, it is worth getting your eyesight checked, for your safety as well as everyone else's. In addition, make sure the car itself is in good shape, see some tips on this in Wikihow http://www.wikihow.com/Reduce-Glare-whe ... g-at-Night.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by dbr » Wed Nov 16, 2016 9:56 am

TX_TURTLE wrote:
verbose wrote:I will look into auto-dimming mirrors. My husband's car has those, I can drive it a bit to test it out, as long as I don't ruin the clutch.

I am in my mid-40's and have a long history of light sensitivity and migraines. It's unlikely to be cataracts. My vision hasn't changed--headlights changed. Several years ago, I asked an ophthalmologist about night driving and she had no suggestions. I can remember first learning to drive at night in the 1990's, being blinded by conventional headlights. It was terrifying but I eventually mastered it. Being older now, I'm not sure if I will adapt again.
Some people develop cataracts earlier than most, and the problems you describe may be related. There are other conditions that may impact your night vision, such as astigmatism. Regardless, it is worth getting your eyesight checked, for your safety as well as everyone else's. In addition, make sure the car itself is in good shape, see some tips on this in Wikihow http://www.wikihow.com/Reduce-Glare-whe ... g-at-Night.
And, my eye doctor has a specific test designed to measure loss of vision in the presence of on-coming lights. It is intended to detect exactly this problem which may be independent of seeing well on other tests.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by bertilak » Wed Nov 16, 2016 10:19 am

kashmoney wrote:What about getting your windows tinted?
At least where I live it is illegal to tint the windshield.
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by dbr » Wed Nov 16, 2016 10:23 am

bertilak wrote:
kashmoney wrote:What about getting your windows tinted?
At least where I live it is illegal to tint the windshield.
For sure, and like wearing sunglasses at night, tinting the windshield would dangerously reduce vision overall and is a really bad idea.

autolycus
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by autolycus » Wed Nov 16, 2016 10:40 am

spammagnet wrote:
TareNeko wrote:... the inside of your windshield should be spotless (no cloudy marks).
This can make a huge difference. Unfortunately, I find the contortions necessary to clean the interior of the windshield and rear window very uncomfortable, and rarely do it property.
Do you have one of these (or similar)?

http://www.autogeek.net/glass-master-pro.html

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ipod_keith
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by ipod_keith » Wed Nov 16, 2016 11:25 am

I'm young, have my eyes checked regularly, and I still cannot stand the brighter car headlights that seem to be getting more common. It's not just me, but my wife, as well. So, yes, getting the eyes checked is a good place to start, but I'm guessing its not OP's eyes that are the issue.

blgaarder
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by blgaarder » Wed Nov 16, 2016 12:18 pm

The regs used to require HID headlights to self-level at startup - doesn't help with hills.

Perhaps polarized lenses might help.

If the lights are on low beam, they can still seem too bright.

It's hard to tell high beams when there aren't two bulbs on at the same time.

Daylight running lights can also be very bright, even during the day.

ten2go
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by ten2go » Wed Nov 16, 2016 1:37 pm

Make sure your windshield and glasses are clean. A little haze on the glass seems to make a big difference with glare.

I also like the suggestion to try a vehicle with a higher road height. It will put you up above the angle where the lights are the brightest.

Also, you may want to get a car that has those nice bright headlights for yourself. Not kidding, you'll get a better view of the road. :)

clutchied
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by clutchied » Wed Nov 16, 2016 2:28 pm

One of things that is frustrating about aftermarket HID headlights is that some cars reflectors are not designed for them.


Headlights are specifically designed to not blind other drivers; unfortunately not all headlights are made for HIDs but it doesn't always stop people from using them.

The issue is that there needs to be a cap or a lid or whatever you want to call on the light so that it doens't shine up and instead illuminates the road. Regular reflector headlights are not designed for HIDs. Some projector lights are.

anyways the issue is your vision but is might also be inconsiderate people putting these incredibly bright lights in trucks without really understanding the design of them. Maybe they do and don't care? No, it's probably ignorance...

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Bammerman
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condition of your windshield

Post by Bammerman » Wed Nov 16, 2016 6:07 pm

The only thing that I have not seen mentioned so far here is the possibility that your windshield has become eroded or "crazed" by sand or other tiny impacts over several years. I don't recall if you mentioned how old your car, or, more specifically, your windshield is, but this is at least a possibility. This is something that we only noticed on our car (1.) at nighttime, and (2.) when our car was some seven or eight years old. The more tiny pits and scratches there are on the windshield, the more places for light to refract; when the windshield is old(er) and there are thousands or millions of nearly microscopic abrasions on the surface of the glass, the total effect can be enough to seriously reduce visibility. Our insurance policy paid for a windshield replacement at no cost to us. A technician came to our house and did the job in about an hour.

dbr
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Re: condition of your windshield

Post by dbr » Wed Nov 16, 2016 6:11 pm

Bammerman wrote:The only thing that I have not seen mentioned so far here is the possibility that your windshield has become eroded or "crazed" by sand or other tiny impacts over several years. I don't recall if you mentioned how old your car, or, more specifically, your windshield is, but this is at least a possibility. This is something that we only noticed on our car (1.) at nighttime, and (2.) when our car was some seven or eight years old. The more tiny pits and scratches there are on the windshield, the more places for light to refract; when the windshield is old(er) and there are thousands or millions of nearly microscopic abrasions on the surface of the glass, the total effect can be enough to seriously reduce visibility. Our insurance policy paid for a windshield replacement at no cost to us. A technician came to our house and did the job in about an hour.
Excellent point, especially combined with the comments about cleaning the inside of the windshield. There are also dirty glasses to be considered. I keep a cleaning cloth in my car just for that.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by lazydavid » Fri Nov 18, 2016 9:44 am

bertilak wrote:
kashmoney wrote:What about getting your windows tinted?
At least where I live it is illegal to tint the windshield.
In most states it's illegal to tint more than the top 4" of the windshield. But in many of those, exceptions are available with a prescription. Even then I wouldn't recommend going super-dark on the windshield. But you could do 20% on the side and rear, and 50-70% on the windshield, which would cut down on brightness dramatically.

Keeping windows clean and in good repair is also critical, as others have mentioned. I've seen as much as a 90% drop in glare after cleaning my windows when they've gotten particularly dirty--going from unbearable even with 5% sunglasses, to comfortable without sunglasses. Dirty sunglasses are just as bad.

But I agree with everyone else that a visit to the optometrist is in order--you should be doing this periodically anyway. My whole family goes once per year (was last weekend, incidentally). I have to, in order to maintain the lifetime warranty on my Lasik, but everyone goes just so we can catch and correct problems early. Costs us about $30-40/person.

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verbose
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by verbose » Thu Dec 08, 2016 8:48 am

OP here,

I had a new eye exam. I have the very beginnings of cataracts, but the optometrist said they shouldn't be affecting my vision yet. She felt the history of migraines was more relevant. But I did get new glasses, same prescription, with "blue-blocking" lenses. These are different from yellow lenses (which I tried years ago unsuccessfully).

So far, the new glasses are greatly improving things. I haven't had them long enough to declare it all "fixed" though. I believe that my problems are worse during "migraine time" (the predrome, aura, headache and post-drome, which generally lasts days).

Yes, my car sits too low. But I don't want a new car. Besides the headlight issue, I enjoy having a smaller car. It's possible that I will get a new-to-me vehicle in a year or two when my teen drives.

I definitely need to have the car washed. Generally I have it washed once a year after the last snow. So, it hasn't been washed since March...

Luckily I live in the Midwest where slower drivers are not too uncommon. I drove in LA once (just airport to hotel). It was absolutely terrifying and I never want to do that again.

Some posters think I might be dangerous. Well, yes, that's why I posted. I take car safety very seriously (perhaps too much).

There is no public transportation to my neighborhood and I have to commute and chauffeur my kids. My children attend private schools with no bus service. I drive all the time. I haven't been at-fault in an accident since 2000. If I didn't drive, I would lose my job, and my kids would have to switch schools and drop most of their activities. I might even have to sell the house and move. It's a pretty drastic thing.

Anyway, with the new glasses, I'm doing much better.

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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by mouses » Thu Dec 08, 2016 12:54 pm

squirm wrote:LED lights on pickups and trucks is insanely bright. I can't believe it's legal.
I can't believe it's legal to have SUV headlights positioned so that they are on a level with the eyes of drivers of regular cars.

It occurs to me that mandatory inspections ought to include correcting mis-aimed headlights,

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Nestegg_User
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by Nestegg_User » Thu Dec 08, 2016 2:35 pm

Mouses

Not all states or areas have inspections-- my current location doesn't have anything.
I suspect one problem , mentioned in a prior thread, was the aftermarket installation of HID lights in reflectors that are not compatible. (I didn't find the thread but it did include a link showing the problem and gave examples of proper and improper installations, vis-a-vis the frontal projection of the headlights . )

likegarden
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Re: Products to cope with other drivers' LED headlight

Post by likegarden » Thu Dec 08, 2016 3:09 pm

I had cataract surgery 3 years ago and can see well while driving at night. At times people forget to turn off their high beam to low and I really get bothered, so I also turn on my high beam so I can see. I hate those blue head lights, are mostly with Acuras so it seems.

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