Which city for part time home during retirement?

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sperry8
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Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by sperry8 » Thu Sep 15, 2016 3:39 am

Hello all,

I've been following along another posters' thread (viewtopic.php?f=11&t=198770) where he asks for suggestions regarding where to rent and retire early. And you are all so knowledgeable and helpful about locales I thought I too would ask for help.

I'm in a different situation than that poster although I too retired early. As such I currently lead a nomadic lifestyle. This has me traveling 6-8 months of the year Internationally. And then when back in the States renting a pad or staying in hotels/AirBnB's for the remaining time. Sometimes when the need arises I will rent for longer and will pull my stuff out of storage and set up my apartment and then when I'm ready to travel again I will put it all back into storage. Primarily this has been occurring in Southern California. However I've tired of SoCal and do not want to "live" there any longer. Further, I'm also tired of setting up an apartment and then packing it up each year (moving every 8 months or so becomes annoying even though I have it down to a science). So my thought is to find a place to buy a 1 BR condo (at least 900 sq ft) or small house (~1,250 sq ft) where I can have a home base. Here are my criteria:

1- Liberal leaning city
2- Decent weather in the winter (this is typically when I'm in the States).
3- Walkable and near trees/hiking
4- Affordable (I'd like to pay $400k or less for my pad). I cannot afford to pay significantly more (as an example Los Angeles would cost double).
5- Near a major International airport.
6- Near culture (restaurants, concerts, festivals, etc.)
7- Has healthy options for food & groceries (Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, or other large sources of organic foods available).
8- Is Global Warming proof - that is, I don't want to buy in a place that will be underwater or have no water and/or will have me lose my investment (think Louisana). Please no political posts about this - don't want the thread closed. Just want to find a safer place where my home purchase will maintain value in the event weather warming continues on its current trajectory.
9- It'd be nice to have a lower overall tax burden although of all the things above I'd give on this first (after all I'm in California now so I'm likely to drop my tax burden post move).

Here are some cities I've considered (#4 & #5 are must haves):

Santa Cruz - doesn't tick box #4 and box #5 may be a stretch (SFO is far especially with traffic).
Oakland/Berkeley - doesn't tick box #4.
Miami - Doesn't tick box #3 or #8
Denver/Boulder - Doesn't tick box #2 and perhaps #1
Seattle - doesn't tick box #2 or #4
Atlanta - unsure about box #1 & box #3 - perhaps this is a possibility?
Las Vegas - doesn't tick box #3 or #8

After reading the other thread - perhaps I'm missing some cities? Would love to see if anyone has suggestions for me. Thanks!
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by tludwig23 » Thu Sep 15, 2016 3:44 am

Portland, depending on your definition of decent weather in the winter.
Austin, TX
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sperry8
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by sperry8 » Thu Sep 15, 2016 4:12 am

tludwig23 wrote:Portland, depending on your definition of decent weather in the winter.
Austin, TX


Thanks.

Portland weather would be too cold in the winter (with highs in the upper forties and lows just above freezing). It does tick many of the other boxes although I'd likely increase my tax burden as property and income taxes are higher than CA (and I don't really spend much annually which is where the tax savings is).

Austin is not near a major International airport (London only via AUS - although Frankfurt is avail summer only). Further I was underwhelmed after a recent visit.
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by tludwig23 » Thu Sep 15, 2016 4:25 am

sperry8 wrote:
tludwig23 wrote:Portland, depending on your definition of decent weather in the winter.
Austin, TX


Thanks.

Portland weather would be too cold in the winter (with highs in the upper forties and lows just above freezing). It does tick many of the other boxes although I'd likely increase my tax burden as property and income taxes are higher than CA (and I don't really spend much annually which is where the tax savings is).

Austin is not near a major International airport (London only via AUS - although Frankfurt is avail summer only). Further I was underwhelmed after a recent visit.


Maybe you should define what you consider to be good weather. Most Portlanders consider the winters to be generally mild, but if you're looking for Southern California weather, it isn't that. The income tax might be an issue if you're earning a lot of income during your time there. OTOH, there's no sales tax.
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sperry8
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by sperry8 » Thu Sep 15, 2016 5:08 am

tludwig23 wrote:
sperry8 wrote:
tludwig23 wrote:Portland, depending on your definition of decent weather in the winter.
Austin, TX


Thanks.

Portland weather would be too cold in the winter (with highs in the upper forties and lows just above freezing). It does tick many of the other boxes although I'd likely increase my tax burden as property and income taxes are higher than CA (and I don't really spend much annually which is where the tax savings is).

Austin is not near a major International airport (London only via AUS - although Frankfurt is avail summer only). Further I was underwhelmed after a recent visit.


Maybe you should define what you consider to be good weather. Most Portlanders consider the winters to be generally mild, but if you're looking for Southern California weather, it isn't that. The income tax might be an issue if you're earning a lot of income during your time there. OTOH, there's no sales tax.


Good idea. I lived in San Francisco and winters there were mid 40's as lows. That would work. Santa Cruz gets down to 40/41... that too would work. But once I see 30's that starts to scare me off. Not a dealbreaker if it ticks all the other boxes but combined with the higher taxes and it starts to lose its appeal. I realize it has no sales tax - but since I live out of the city for 8 months a year, my sales tax savings would be nominal. I'd likely be better off saving income or property tax (and paying sales tax). I may need to take a re-look at Portland (or surrounding neighborhoods) again. I am hoping another city or two pops up on the list too for comparison purposes.
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Ready3Retire
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by Ready3Retire » Thu Sep 15, 2016 5:45 am

How about Ft. Collins, CO, or Nashville, TN?

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sperry8
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by sperry8 » Thu Sep 15, 2016 6:58 am

Ready3Retire wrote:How about Ft. Collins, CO, or Nashville, TN?


I love Nashville's music scene and the prices of homes are perfect. Sadly it does not tick box #1 or box #2 (weather) or #5 (no Int'l flights from its airport).

I don't know anything about Ft Collins - but imagine it to be too cold like Denver/Boulder. I will look into it further however.

Thanks for the suggestions, appreciated.
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tigermilk
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by tigermilk » Thu Sep 15, 2016 7:20 am

sperry8 wrote:1- Liberal leaning city
2- Decent weather in the winter (this is typically when I'm in the States).
3- Walkable and near trees/hiking
4- Affordable (I'd like to pay $400k or less for my pad). I cannot afford to pay significantly more (as an example Los Angeles would cost double).
5- Near a major International airport.
6- Near culture (restaurants, concerts, festivals, etc.)
7- Has healthy options for food & groceries (Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, or other large sources of organic foods available).
8- Is Global Warming proof - that is, I don't want to buy in a place that will be underwater or have no water and/or will have me lose my investment (think Louisana). Please no political posts about this - don't want the thread closed. Just want to find a safer place where my home purchase will maintain value in the event weather warming continues on its current trajectory.
9- It'd be nice to have a lower overall tax burden although of all the things above I'd give on this first (after all I'm in California now so I'm likely to drop my tax burden post move).

Houston, TX.

1. Not necessarily, but Houston is probably the most ethnically diverse city in the USA now. There is no majority ethnicity, and we have large populations from various regions. Houston proper is probably a bit more left-leaning compared to the 'burbs. Houston hasn't had a Republican mayor since the early '80s.
2. Winter - aside from a couple of cold days here and there, mostly the high temperatures from October to April are in the 50s to low 80s. I enjoy bike riding year round, but enjoy it even more in the winter. Stay away from here in the summer - you'll melt. Late June to mid-September is our miserable time.
3. Depending on where you are, yes. Sam Houston National Forest is about an hour north of Houston. A couple of nice parks in town with hiking/mountain bike trails.
4. Yes.
5. Daily non-stop flights to Europe, Central/South America, Asia. United clearly has the biggest market share in Houston (it's a hub), but you have access for direct flights with British Airways, Emirates, Turkish Airlines, China Air, Korean Air, Lufthansa, Air France, KLM, and more I'm forgetting.
6. In spades. The aforementioned ethnic diversity manifests itself with numerous cultural events, some of the best food in the USA (just do a search for some past NY Times praise of the Houston food scene), a top 3 to 5 opera company, a couple of great art museums (MFAH, Rothko), Rice University has a top 3 music program with plenty of free concerts, plenty of concerts of all types.
7. There are numerous Whole Foods, a few Trader Joes, and Central Market (better than either of the aforementioned). Organics can be purchased in any grocer in town, and there are several co-ops as well as farms open to the public within driving distance.
8. Unless you are on the coast subject to potential coastal erosion, there's no threat being 50 miles inland in Houston. I live about 30 miles from the coast south of Houston and haven't had a concern in the 25+ years I've lived there.
9. No state income tax, but property taxes are a killer - 2%-3%+ depending on the local rates. Sales tax is 8.25%.

Someone mentioned Austin. My mother-in-law is there. She laments about buying there. Great town, but for her cultural stuff is #1. Austin ranks well below Houston and Dallas in that respect. Yes you get more interesting acts (i.e., indie music scene) coming to Austin for concerts than Houston or Dallas, but if you aren't a fan of that genre why bother? Beside, depending on where you are, central Austin is only 120-150 minutes away.

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by vested1 » Thu Sep 15, 2016 8:17 am

I would consider a couple of locations in Washington that get less rain than most people realize. Anacortes is beautiful, and getting to Seattle for flights is a ferry ride away. Average rainfall is 27.85" and snowfall is about 3" a year scattered over several months. There is no State tax, although property and sales taxes make up the difference. You say that you're retired, so having retirement income free from State taxes saves you whatever you're paying in California.

The other location in Washington that I would suggest is Port Townsend, which is also mild, getting around 26" of rain a year and maybe 4" of snow. Both cities have great access to the ferry system. Both are also liberal leaning and both have periodic cultural festivals. Recreational activities are another plus, with the sound and the Olympics at your doorstep.

I would suggest Monterey, Ca but your 400k budget wouldn't get you much, even for a condo. You are already aware of the tax situation in Ca, so I won't go into that. SFO and SJC are accessible via the Air Bus from Monterey, which services both airports. The beauty and political aspects of the area meet your requirements.

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Watty
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by Watty » Thu Sep 15, 2016 8:39 am

sperry8 wrote:Atlanta - unsure about box #1 & box #3 - perhaps this is a possibility?

1- Liberal leaning city
2- Decent weather in the winter (this is typically when I'm in the States).
3- Walkable and near trees/hiking





I'm in Atlanta, a few comments.

#1, Not really but it is relatively diverse with all sorts of different lifestyles.
#2, Hot and humid in the summers, winters may get one or two light snows but no-one know how to drive on snow.
#3, Not walk-able for the most part, Some hiking trails in town in parks and along wooded rivers but generally about an hour or two drive to get to the woods.

Atlanta itself is not a common retirement destination but there are retirement communities in the north Georgia mountains and along the Georgia coast.

Georgia does exempt Social Security and the first $65,000 per person($130K a couple) of other retirement income from state taxes so many retired people will not pay any state income taxes.

Property taxes vary greatly by which county you are in. I only pay about $650 (not a typo) a year in property taxes on a pretty average house. My county is a rare one which exempts seniors over 62 from paying school property taxes. In most other counties a similar house would pay a couple of thousand dollars a year in property taxes. With the way other exemptions work the property taxes on more expensive houses will be proportionally higher.


One suggestion, instead of large cities you might want to look at college towns that are a reasonable drive from a large city.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_c ... ted_States

SRenaeP
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by SRenaeP » Thu Sep 15, 2016 9:38 am

Watty wrote:
sperry8 wrote:Atlanta - unsure about box #1 & box #3 - perhaps this is a possibility?

1- Liberal leaning city
2- Decent weather in the winter (this is typically when I'm in the States).
3- Walkable and near trees/hiking





I'm in Atlanta, a few comments.

#1, Not really but it is relatively diverse with all sorts of different lifestyles.
#2, Hot and humid in the summers, winters may get one or two light snows but no-one know how to drive on snow.
#3, Not walk-able for the most part, Some hiking trails in town in parks and along wooded rivers but generally about an hour or two drive to get to the woods.

Atlanta itself is not a common retirement destination but there are retirement communities in the north Georgia mountains and along the Georgia coast.

Georgia does exempt Social Security and the first $65,000 per person($130K a couple) of other retirement income from state taxes so many retired people will not pay any state income taxes.

Property taxes vary greatly by which county you are in. I only pay about $650 (not a typo) a year in property taxes on a pretty average house. My county is a rare one which exempts seniors over 62 from paying school property taxes. In most other counties a similar house would pay a couple of thousand dollars a year in property taxes. With the way other exemptions work the property taxes on more expensive houses will be proportionally higher.


One suggestion, instead of large cities you might want to look at college towns that are a reasonable drive from a large city.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_c ... ted_States


I think Atlanta is walkable if you stay ITP (inside the perimeter, for those who aren't local). You can definitely find what you like within your price range as well. In fact, given the (relatively) low price of real estate in the area for what you're looking for, perhaps consider getting a two or three bedroom and renting to flight attendants or similar who travel often. That way the place is not *completely* empty while you're gone and it will help defray your costs.

-Steph

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by SuzBanyan » Thu Sep 15, 2016 10:24 am

Have you looked at San Luis Obispo?
It doesn't have international flights, but it's about 3.5 hours from San Jose and the same from LAX, so there are options. There are condos in okay locations in your price range and in slightly better locations (higher walkability rating) just above your price range. Of course, it is in California with all the tax implications (though if you own for 20 years, you'll really appreciate your property tax). Cal Poly University brings more cultural events to the area and the local vineyards bring a better food culture than might otherwise be justified by its size. It is generally cooler than LA in both winter and summer, but freezes are pretty rare.

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by dbr » Thu Sep 15, 2016 10:30 am

There should be a locations screener somewhere into which a person could enter criteria and the screener would pop out a list of suitable communities. One feature is that most requests will be able to be answered with the result TANSP (there ain't no such place) or the answer "too many candidates - please refine choices."

I think the suggestion to look at a list of college towns rather than large cities is a really good one.

I notice no one mentioned Knoxville, TN yet. It is really tough when the criteria are a laundry list of reasons to reject a choice. I thought Portland was fairly plausible as well and also Eugene.

"Good" weather is a difficult criterion to pin down.

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by surveyor » Thu Sep 15, 2016 10:30 am

Athens Georgia? That's where I would head.

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Hayden
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by Hayden » Thu Sep 15, 2016 10:41 am

I also am enjoying a nomadic lifestyle, and have been wrestling with a similar question. Personally, I have not ruled out colder areas; I just travel during those months and stay home during the summer when it is beautiful.

I favor WA state. I've been thinking about Spokane and surrounding areas.

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by BolderBoy » Thu Sep 15, 2016 11:05 am

sperry8 wrote:Here are my criteria:

1- Liberal leaning city
2- Decent weather in the winter (this is typically when I'm in the States).
3- Walkable and near trees/hiking
4- Affordable (I'd like to pay $400k or less for my pad). I cannot afford to pay significantly more (as an example Los Angeles would cost double).
5- Near a major International airport.
6- Near culture (restaurants, concerts, festivals, etc.)
7- Has healthy options for food & groceries (Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, or other large sources of organic foods available).
8- Is Global Warming proof - that is, I don't want to buy in a place that will be underwater or have no water and/or will have me lose my investment (think Louisana). Please no political posts about this - don't want the thread closed. Just want to find a safer place where my home purchase will maintain value in the event weather warming continues on its current trajectory.
9- It'd be nice to have a lower overall tax burden although of all the things above I'd give on this first (after all I'm in California now so I'm likely to drop my tax burden post move).

Are these criteria in the order of importance to you? If not, could you please rank-order them?
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CFOKevin
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by CFOKevin » Thu Sep 15, 2016 11:13 am

I think something in the Charlotte, NC area might fit the bill for you.

Good luck,

Kevin

furwut
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by furwut » Thu Sep 15, 2016 11:15 am

What will you do with the apartment the 6 - 8 months a year while you are gone? If you think you might rent it out, assuming the condo laws allow it, you might want to add housing desirability/need as a factor to your list.

Being nomadic for much of the year sounds interesting. I'm much the opposite right now but I think if I were living such a lifestyle I would have as few as possessions as possible and, when I return to the States, would enjoy setting up fresh in a new city each time.

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by jjface » Thu Sep 15, 2016 11:17 am

SRenaeP wrote:
Watty wrote:
sperry8 wrote:Atlanta - unsure about box #1 & box #3 - perhaps this is a possibility?

1- Liberal leaning city
2- Decent weather in the winter (this is typically when I'm in the States).
3- Walkable and near trees/hiking





I'm in Atlanta, a few comments.

#1, Not really but it is relatively diverse with all sorts of different lifestyles.
#2, Hot and humid in the summers, winters may get one or two light snows but no-one know how to drive on snow.
#3, Not walk-able for the most part, Some hiking trails in town in parks and along wooded rivers but generally about an hour or two drive to get to the woods.

Atlanta itself is not a common retirement destination but there are retirement communities in the north Georgia mountains and along the Georgia coast.

Georgia does exempt Social Security and the first $65,000 per person($130K a couple) of other retirement income from state taxes so many retired people will not pay any state income taxes.

Property taxes vary greatly by which county you are in. I only pay about $650 (not a typo) a year in property taxes on a pretty average house. My county is a rare one which exempts seniors over 62 from paying school property taxes. In most other counties a similar house would pay a couple of thousand dollars a year in property taxes. With the way other exemptions work the property taxes on more expensive houses will be proportionally higher.


One suggestion, instead of large cities you might want to look at college towns that are a reasonable drive from a large city.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_c ... ted_States


I think Atlanta is walkable if you stay ITP (inside the perimeter, for those who aren't local). You can definitely find what you like within your price range as well. In fact, given the (relatively) low price of real estate in the area for what you're looking for, perhaps consider getting a two or three bedroom and renting to flight attendants or similar who travel often. That way the place is not *completely* empty while you're gone and it will help defray your costs.

-Steph


Walkable but not a pleasant walk.

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by skjoldur » Thu Sep 15, 2016 11:29 am

I think you might be overlooking the advantages of your nomadic schedule. You are applying the criteria very rigidly to reject alternatives, but your schedule seems to give you a lot more flexibility than someone who will live in their place year round. I suspect that if you relax some of your requirements you will have a lot of great options.

For example:

Proximity to international airport doesn't seem critical to your lifestyle. If you are leaving and returning once a year with a bunch of nomadic wandering in between, then a bit of a longer trip to the international airport or an extra short hop flight does not seem like a big drawback.

Weather does not seem so critical either. Given your schedule, there is very high chance you will be absent during the weather you don't like.

good luck

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by westie » Thu Sep 15, 2016 12:00 pm

Looking at a map of airports, your best choices are Nashville, Charlotte, or Atlanta.

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by protagonist » Thu Sep 15, 2016 12:26 pm

I live in Northampton, MA. Google it. I live in the tropics during the winter (I rent out my home for the winter), and I spend a good part of the summer in Europe.

1- Liberal leaning city: Very. Less than 4% republicans.
2- Decent weather in the winter (this is typically when I'm in the States): Definitely not. If you cannot shift your schedule to escape winters, this is probably not for you.
3- Walkable and near trees/hiking: Yes. Beautiful mountains, rivers, lakes all around. For beaches, Cape Cod is a 2 1/2 hr drive, and there are others closer.
4- Affordable (I'd like to pay $400k or less for my pad).: Easily less than $400K. Lots of historical architecture.
5- Near a major International airport: BDL is 40 min drive and well connected. BOS about 1h45min. JFK or LGA about 2 hr 30 min.
6- Near culture (restaurants, concerts, festivals, etc.): Lots. Voted #1 small city arts community in America. Plus Boston (1 1/2 hr away) and NYC (2 1/2 hr away) are day trips. Montreal is about 4 1/2 hr by car.
7- Has healthy options for food & groceries (Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, or other large sources of organic foods available): Everywhere. Plus lots of farmer's markets. Most things are walkable or bikeable.
8- Is Global Warming proof: Yep. If NYC and Boston get flooded you might find yourself with waterfront property (laughing)
9- It'd be nice to have a lower overall tax burden although of all the things above I'd give on this first (after all I'm in California now so I'm likely to drop my tax burden post move): Certainly better than CA. I think state tax is 5.5%. No city tax. Property tax is about $16/$1000 assessed/year

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by sperry8 » Thu Sep 15, 2016 6:48 pm

BolderBoy wrote:Are these criteria in the order of importance to you? If not, could you please rank-order them?


Sure here they are ranked:

1- Affordable (I'd like to pay $400k or less for my pad). I cannot afford to pay significantly more (as an example Los Angeles would cost double).
2- Liberal leaning city (I have been using this for a quick glance to identify https://www.crowdpac.com/games/lookup/hometown?)
3- Decent weather in the winter (this is typically when I'm in the States). e.g., if the place sees snow it is too cold.
4- Walkable and near trees/hiking (no more than 1 hour away for hiking). I have been using this: https://www.walkscore.com/ to identify walkability
5- Near culture (restaurants, concerts, festivals, etc.)
6- Has healthy options for food & groceries (Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, farmers markets, or other large sources of organic foods available).
7- Near a major International airport or at least near an airport (1 hr or less away).
8- Is Global Warming proof - that is, I don't want to buy in a place that will be underwater or have no water and/or will have me lose my investment (think Louisana). Please no political posts about this - don't want the thread closed. Just want to find a safer place where my home purchase will maintain value in the event weather warming continues on its current trajectory.
9- It'd be nice to have a lower overall tax burden although of all the things above I'd give on this first (after all I'm in California now so I'm likely to drop my tax burden post move).

1-3 are must haves for me. 4-6 are important but I could likely make due with 2 of the 3.
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by sperry8 » Thu Sep 15, 2016 7:01 pm

tigermilk wrote:Houston, TX.

1. Not necessarily, but Houston is probably the most ethnically diverse city in the USA now. There is no majority ethnicity, and we have large populations from various regions. Houston proper is probably a bit more left-leaning compared to the 'burbs. Houston hasn't had a Republican mayor since the early '80s.


Thanks for the idea. I have done some research in Atlanta and have identified that while not a generally liberal city there are sections that lean left (Druid Hills, Midtown, Decatur, etc). I wonder if this is true in Houston too? I do love the food in Houston and the Int'l airport is perfect for travels either to Europe or Asia.

vested1 wrote:I would consider a couple of locations in Washington that get less rain than most people realize. Anacortes is beautiful, and getting to Seattle for flights is a ferry ride away. Average rainfall is 27.85" and snowfall is about 3" a year scattered over several months. There is no State tax, although property and sales taxes make up the difference. You say that you're retired, so having retirement income free from State taxes saves you whatever you're paying in California.

The other location in Washington that I would suggest is Port Townsend, which is also mild, getting around 26" of rain a year and maybe 4" of snow. Both cities have great access to the ferry system. Both are also liberal leaning and both have periodic cultural festivals. Recreational activities are another plus, with the sound and the Olympics at your doorstep.

I would suggest Monterey, Ca but your 400k budget wouldn't get you much, even for a condo. You are already aware of the tax situation in Ca, so I won't go into that. SFO and SJC are accessible via the Air Bus from Monterey, which services both airports. The beauty and political aspects of the area meet your requirements.


Interesting ideas. I thought about Seattle but didn't consider the surrounds. Monterey is beautiful but is terribly far from a real airport. I'd like to be within 1 hr of one. Being nomadic I travel a lot.

dbr wrote:I notice no one mentioned Knoxville, TN yet. It is really tough when the criteria are a laundry list of reasons to reject a choice. I thought Portland was fairly plausible as well and also Eugene.

"Good" weather is a difficult criterion to pin down.


Knoxville does not appear to fit my criteria of a liberal city. Portland is a fair option and I have re-placed it on the to consider list. I hadn't thought of Eugene and will add it to the list, thanks.

Re weather - anyplace without snow will work. So the Northeast is out, for example.

surveyor wrote:Athens Georgia? That's where I would head.


Doesn't meet my criteria of a liberal city.

Hayden wrote:I also am enjoying a nomadic lifestyle, and have been wrestling with a similar question. Personally, I have not ruled out colder areas; I just travel during those months and stay home during the summer when it is beautiful.

I favor WA state. I've been thinking about Spokane and surrounding areas.


I tend to stay in Europe during summer and fall. This leaves me in the States in our winter and thus prefer an area that doesn't see snow (or much of it).

Thanks for the idea of Spokane - will look into it.

westie wrote:Looking at a map of airports, your best choices are Nashville, Charlotte, or Atlanta.


Sadly, Nashville and Charlotte do not meet my criteria of a liberal city.
Atlanta generally doesn't - but with more digging identified a large area within the city that leans left (Midtown, Druid Hills, Decatur, etc). Perhaps Nashville and Charlotte have something similar?

Thanks all for the new ideas!
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by sperry8 » Thu Sep 15, 2016 7:09 pm

skjoldur wrote:I think you might be overlooking the advantages of your nomadic schedule. You are applying the criteria very rigidly to reject alternatives, but your schedule seems to give you a lot more flexibility than someone who will live in their place year round. I suspect that if you relax some of your requirements you will have a lot of great options.

For example:

Proximity to international airport doesn't seem critical to your lifestyle. If you are leaving and returning once a year with a bunch of nomadic wandering in between, then a bit of a longer trip to the international airport or an extra short hop flight does not seem like a big drawback.

Weather does not seem so critical either. Given your schedule, there is very high chance you will be absent during the weather you don't like.

good luck


Thank you for making me rethink about this. I have struggled with my desire for flexibility and yet am setting rigid criteria for a home base. I have re-considered the airport criteria from must-have to nice to have. As you point out I travel for extended periods of time and as long as I am near a domestic airport I can bear the 1 stop from it to an Int'l one the 4 or so times I travel abroad annually. This opens up some possibilities for me.

Re weather, I have wrestled with this for a while. I know it is shutting out possibilities in large swaths of the country many of which have exactly the type of culture, walkability and nature/trees I like. However in the 9 years I've been leading this lifestyle I have spent most of summer and fall in Europe. This leaves me with winter and possibly Spring in the US. Sure I can re-arrange but I strongly prefer summers and fall in Europe. I don't want to trade that. In fact, I'd prefer my home base to be in Europe! But sadly Europe will only have a US Passport holder 90 days out of any 180. A few countries will let you live in them and give you a long-term residency passport to stay solely in that country but the cost is usually greater than I want to spend ($550k+ except for Malta). So while you are correct that I have the flexibility - my #1 preference is summer in Europe and that leaves me with winter in the US. Thus the weather preference. Still I appreciate you making me rethink. It's hard to figure stuff out on your own sometimes and being challenged to rethink is quite helpful.
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by btenny » Thu Sep 15, 2016 7:20 pm

Davis CA or close by

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by Bertie » Thu Sep 15, 2016 7:32 pm

Gainesville, Florida. College town (University of Florida) that's fairly inexpensive. Reasonably liberal and good winter weather (summers are hot). Walkable (what college town isn't?) and loads of outdoor stuff close by. Good restaurants and the university has a fair number of cultural activities (although less culture than Atlanta or Houston). Small airport that has shortish flights to Atlanta, Orlando, and Miami — and from those cities you can fly anywhere in the world. You can also drive to Orlando International, but that's probably two hours. No state income tax. Well inland, so global warming proof (and out of the path that hurricanes and tropical storms typically take when they cut across Florida).

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by radiowave » Thu Sep 15, 2016 7:40 pm

Orlando, FL? pretty diverse culture, for the South it's pretty liberal (all things being relative of course). Plenty to do (there is Disney of course and the other theme parks), excellent airport with many international destinations especially to Europe, walkable is a relative term but there is the Circle B ranch, a huge protected bird sanctuary in Winterhaven just west of Orlando, the Atlantic Ocean beaches are an hour a way, housing is pretty reasonable especially if you get a little west or south of the city, no state income tax, if you stay 6months you can declare residency (snowbird status), it's pretty flat so no mountains close by like NC but you won't have to worry about it snowing. Its a major metropolitan area and the I4 traffic can get congested especially late fall through early spring.

Take a look.
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by Boglegonks » Thu Sep 15, 2016 8:40 pm

Asheville, N. C. fits many of your criteria, but not all.

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by radiowave » Thu Sep 15, 2016 8:55 pm

Boglegonks wrote:Asheville, N. C. fits many of your criteria, but not all.


FYI, Asheville can get pretty cold in the winter, e.g. down into the teens and snow is uncommon but possible. Since the OP is very sensitive to cold weather, Asheville probably won't be a good winter second home. But I do agree, its a great place, nestled next to the mountains, plenty to do and see. Boone and Banner Elk about 1.5 hours north of AVL as also possibilities, be that's the ski areas for NC so snow is a definite possibility.
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by whatusername? » Thu Sep 15, 2016 9:03 pm

Have you looked in to Fort Worth, Texas? In a central location it would hit your walkability requirement. It leans liberal (not a tilt, but a lean), it's laid back with a low cost of living, a short ride on public transport to DFW airport, and a cold winter there requires a jacket, not a parka.

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by protagonist » Thu Sep 15, 2016 10:05 pm

sperry8 wrote:
skjoldur wrote:I think you might be overlooking the advantages of your nomadic schedule. You are applying the criteria very rigidly to reject alternatives, but your schedule seems to give you a lot more flexibility than someone who will live in their place year round. I suspect that if you relax some of your requirements you will have a lot of great options.

For example:

Proximity to international airport doesn't seem critical to your lifestyle. If you are leaving and returning once a year with a bunch of nomadic wandering in between, then a bit of a longer trip to the international airport or an extra short hop flight does not seem like a big drawback.

Weather does not seem so critical either. Given your schedule, there is very high chance you will be absent during the weather you don't like.

good luck


Thank you for making me rethink about this. I have struggled with my desire for flexibility and yet am setting rigid criteria for a home base. I have re-considered the airport criteria from must-have to nice to have. As you point out I travel for extended periods of time and as long as I am near a domestic airport I can bear the 1 stop from it to an Int'l one the 4 or so times I travel abroad annually. This opens up some possibilities for me.

Re weather, I have wrestled with this for a while. I know it is shutting out possibilities in large swaths of the country many of which have exactly the type of culture, walkability and nature/trees I like. However in the 9 years I've been leading this lifestyle I have spent most of summer and fall in Europe. This leaves me with winter and possibly Spring in the US. Sure I can re-arrange but I strongly prefer summers and fall in Europe. I don't want to trade that. In fact, I'd prefer my home base to be in Europe! But sadly Europe will only have a US Passport holder 90 days out of any 180. A few countries will let you live in them and give you a long-term residency passport to stay solely in that country but the cost is usually greater than I want to spend ($550k+ except for Malta). So while you are correct that I have the flexibility - my #1 preference is summer in Europe and that leaves me with winter in the US. Thus the weather preference. Still I appreciate you making me rethink. It's hard to figure stuff out on your own sometimes and being challenged to rethink is quite helpful.


IMHO, winters, though miserable in winter in most of Europe, are more miserable in most of the US.
On the other hand, IMHO, summers are nicer in most of the US than in most of Europe.
So, not knowing where you live in Europe, maybe you could do some switching around. I escape New England for almost all winter for warmer climes (tropical), and I divide my summers between New England (I love NE summers) and Europe, where it is beautiful as well, and where I have reason to be.
I guess it is probably fairly nice in Provence most of the year, but I don't know that for a fact.
There really aren't many (if any) places in the USA on your list that meet all your criteria....which is too bad, because my criteria are not so far off yours. That is why I am out of the country so much. Climate is a problem in much of N America.
Last edited by protagonist on Thu Sep 15, 2016 11:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by frequentT » Thu Sep 15, 2016 10:35 pm

Your list is pretty tough to check every item 100%. My suggestions optimize the total list though I am not positive about about rent costs. Particularly difficult to find that rent close to an international airport.

You will have a sizable budget gain leaving CA for overall COL + taxes.

Texas cities: Austin & Dallas are worth investigating.

North Carolina: Durham, Chapel Hill, Raleigh, Asheville

Vancouver, WA

I can tell your travel is highly important, so like others have said, the hassle of pack/unpack saves enough cash that can fund more travel!

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by happyhiker » Fri Sep 16, 2016 12:31 am

Santa Cruz does have condos under 400K. There are more over that number, for example a newly renovated 770 sq ft 2/1 was just listed for 450K. If you are willing to go smaller than 900 sq ft I think you can find something in your price range. And while SFO is about 90 minutes from Santa Cruz, San Jose is half that and has pretty good service on domestic routes. As you know, Santa Cruz checks all your other boxes. Perhaps the biggest problem would be finding a place to rent should you want to test the water by renting before buying - there is a serious shortage of available rentals right now.

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by scubacat » Fri Sep 16, 2016 1:26 am

Just curious what your definition of liberal is if Athens, GA doesn't meet it. UGA is located there and Athens is liberal on almost social and political issues. Clarke county votes democrat. It's a great town and meets most of your criteria and its home to REM!

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by German Expat » Fri Sep 16, 2016 4:36 am

Booulder, CO was probably the most liberal town I was ever living at. Also weather is great in the winter, most of the time sun but it is cold. What is your definition of good weather? Warm? I am ok if its cold as long as its sunny, the rest is just a matter of proper clothing but in fairness I do like winter sports and I do like seasons.

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by metacritic » Fri Sep 16, 2016 7:59 am

I think you are ruling out cities without adequate reason. For example, you rule out Boulder and Denver for weather, when they have some of the best weather in the US. Yes it can snow but it often will then be 65-70 degrees the same day. Neither can be regarded as anything but liberal. Look at the voting trends in the state the last eight years. And I lived in the Bay Area.

I can't see why airports matter given the infrequency of flights from your us hub. I'm also unclear as to what you gain from buying vs renting for 5 months.

But really why live in the us at all given your criteria? Why not a small town in Spain or Italy? Or Costa Rica or Bali or Thailand or Mexico, etc?

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by sperry8 » Fri Sep 16, 2016 12:00 pm

radiowave wrote:
Boglegonks wrote:Asheville, N. C. fits many of your criteria, but not all.


FYI, Asheville can get pretty cold in the winter, e.g. down into the teens and snow is uncommon but possible. Since the OP is very sensitive to cold weather, Asheville probably won't be a good winter second home. But I do agree, its a great place, nestled next to the mountains, plenty to do and see. Boone and Banner Elk about 1.5 hours north of AVL as also possibilities, be that's the ski areas for NC so snow is a definite possibility.


Seems like a nice city. But it gets snow. 13" annually on average. That's more than a foot where I come from. No go for me.

whatusername? wrote:Have you looked in to Fort Worth, Texas? In a central location it would hit your walkability requirement. It leans liberal (not a tilt, but a lean), it's laid back with a low cost of living, a short ride on public transport to DFW airport, and a cold winter there requires a jacket, not a parka.


Doesn't meet my criteria of liberal according to the site I am using to identify this tilt: https://www.crowdpac.com/games/lookup/h ... orth,%20TX

scubacat wrote:Just curious what your definition of liberal is if Athens, GA doesn't meet it. UGA is located there and Athens is liberal on almost social and political issues. Clarke county votes democrat. It's a great town and meets most of your criteria and its home to REM!


I am using this website to get a quick estimation of where a city falls on the liberal scale: https://www.crowdpac.com/games/lookup/h ... hens,%20GA
Perhaps however it is misleading me. Maybe it shows the whole area - but as you suggest a portion of a city could be more liberal. I found this to be the case in Atlanta when I researched further.

German Expat wrote:Boulder, CO was probably the most liberal town I was ever living at. Also weather is great in the winter, most of the time sun but it is cold. What is your definition of good weather? Warm? I am ok if its cold as long as its sunny, the rest is just a matter of proper clothing but in fairness I do like winter sports and I do like seasons.


Good weather is an area that does not see snow. Boulder has snow and lots of it. 89" annually.

metacritic wrote:I think you are ruling out cities without adequate reason. For example, you rule out Boulder and Denver for weather, when they have some of the best weather in the US. Yes it can snow but it often will then be 65-70 degrees the same day. Neither can be regarded as anything but liberal. Look at the voting trends in the state the last eight years. And I lived in the Bay Area.

I can't see why airports matter given the infrequency of flights from your us hub. I'm also unclear as to what you gain from buying vs renting for 5 months.

But really why live in the us at all given your criteria? Why not a small town in Spain or Italy? Or Costa Rica or Bali or Thailand or Mexico, etc?


Each of us has our own reasons... for me and adequate reason is material amounts of snow (more than Seattle's few inches) are a non-starter. But I do agree Denver & clearly Boulder would tick my liberal box. Lots of Bay Area folk are moving there now due to prices in both areas.

Due to this thread I have significantly loosened my airport requirement and now am happy anyplace that is within 1 hour of a decent domestic airport. Your thoughts have opened up my eyes in this regard.

To your last point, I agree!! I would much prefer to live in Europe. However they won't have me. US Passport holders are only allowed to live in Europe 90 out of a rolling 180 days. There are long term residency visas supplied by some countries but they require a minimum purchase of $550k (except for Malta). So I am stuck as a visitor.

happyhiker wrote:Santa Cruz does have condos under 400K. There are more over that number, for example a newly renovated 770 sq ft 2/1 was just listed for 450K. If you are willing to go smaller than 900 sq ft I think you can find something in your price range. And while SFO is about 90 minutes from Santa Cruz, San Jose is half that and has pretty good service on domestic routes. As you know, Santa Cruz checks all your other boxes. Perhaps the biggest problem would be finding a place to rent should you want to test the water by renting before buying - there is a serious shortage of available rentals right now.


I wish this were true as SC does tick all the boxes except price. I spent yesterday on the real estate websites searching for a place and the lowest price I could find was $500k for 900 sq ft. And in this range there were just a few properties. Anything less was a true fixer upper and although said $400k really required more money to make it liveable for me. The reality is since I will only spend a few months of the year in the place I have to stick to my budget of <$400k (or preferably even less). While I can afford more place it just doesn't make prudent financial sense to push the budget.
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by BlueCable » Fri Sep 16, 2016 12:07 pm

I really disagree with many of the cities you list as being non-liberal. Nashville and Charlotte are kind of liberal islands in the middle of conservative states. Sure, there are conservative suburbs, but they cities themselves are liberal. Not Berkley liberal, but liberal.

edit: removed political-ish comment
Last edited by BlueCable on Fri Sep 16, 2016 12:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by ilostmywallet » Fri Sep 16, 2016 12:17 pm

northern nevada.

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by orca91 » Fri Sep 16, 2016 12:25 pm

sperry8 wrote:Good weather is an area that does not see snow. Boulder has snow and lots of it. 89" annually.

.....

Each of us has our own reasons... for me and adequate reason is material amounts of snow (more than Seattle's few inches) are a non-starter. But I do agree Denver & clearly Boulder would tick my liberal box. Lots of Bay Area folk are moving there now due to prices in both areas.

Due to this thread I have significantly loosened my airport requirement and now am happy anyplace that is within 1 hour of a decent domestic airport. Your thoughts have opened up my eyes in this regard.


Are you against this, as in you never want to see a flake of snow?

I don't think you're realizing what that snowfall means in Boulder and Denver. It does snow there, no doubt. But, it snows in bunches with plenty of inches worth in one falling. And, then it's 60 degrees and sunny the next day and the snow is gone. It's not snow on the ground from Nov. to March.

If you don't have to a job or anything, sit inside on the snow days and enjoy the view. It will be warm again soon.

I lived in the Denver area for 5 years, and reading your list I immediately thought of Denver and especially Boulder, it the liberal city part is that important to you. What do they call it, "The Republic of Boulder"... or, something like that? :happy

I now live in the Seattle area. That or Portland would also fit very well for most of your list. If you don't mind the gray and the rain/drizzle. It rarely gets below freezing... Seattle area at least. It's often 40 for the high and 35 for the low on many days, or similar.

You can probably scratch Spokane off your list. I don't think they're too liberal out there and it can get bitterly cold and snowy over there.
Last edited by orca91 on Fri Sep 16, 2016 12:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by sperry8 » Fri Sep 16, 2016 12:28 pm

BlueCable wrote:I really disagree with many of the cities you list as being non-liberal. Nashville and Charlotte are kind of liberal islands in the middle of conservative states. Sure, there are conservative suburbs, but they cities themselves are liberal. Not Berkley liberal, but liberal.


Please let's do our best to not make this a political post as I don't want the thread to be closed since this thread is helping me think about the best place to have a home base. I am not in any way attempting to disparage anyone's views. As I have stated numerous times in the thread I am using this website to identify liberal leanings: https://www.crowdpac.com/games/lookup/h ... otte,%20NC Perhaps it is removing many parts of cities that are liberal islands as you say. Or perhaps it is flat out wrong. I am not seeking Berkeley liberal. Just liberal leaning.

I appreciate your comments but have to draw the line somewhere and use some online tools to identify and narrow down possibilities. Please know I have visited both Nashville and Charlotte and found both to be charming cities. I especially liked Nashville's music scene! However at this time, neither city is under personal consideration for me.
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by ArmchairArchitect » Fri Sep 16, 2016 12:29 pm

Philadelphia by far. It's a real/big city. 3rd largest downtown in the country (this is the better measure, versus cities that have higher population due purely to ridiculously large borders/sprawl, such as Houston or Phoenix), so it's real, walkable, lively city living.

1- Liberal leaning city.
Philly is too liberal, to the point of lots of Democratic (one-party "machine) corruption, similar to Chicago. You should really be looking for a city with political checks and balances, for this category.
2- Decent weather in the winter (this is typically when I'm in the States).
There's snow, and it's cold, but nothing like Chicago or even NYC as it's a little further south.
3- Walkable and near trees/hiking
Fairmount Park (and Wissahickon Creek) is the country's largest urban park, and it's starts from right near the center of the city.
4- Affordable (I'd like to pay $400k or less for my pad). I cannot afford to pay significantly more (as an example Los Angeles would cost double).
Philly is the most affordable major city. You can live very nicely within this price range.
5- Near a major International airport.
PHL, lots of direct flights internationally.
6- Near culture (restaurants, concerts, festivals, etc.)
Arguably the best food attainable food scene in the country. Great indie music scene, Philadelphia Orchestra is internationally recognized, lots of street festivals, etc.
7- Has healthy options for food & groceries (Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, or other large sources of organic foods available).
Trader Joes, Whole Paycheck, and lots of independent grocers. City dwellers are really into eating healthy here.
8- Is Global Warming proof - that is, I don't want to buy in a place that will be underwater or have no water and/or will have me lose my investment (think Louisana). Please no political posts about this - don't want the thread closed. Just want to find a safer place where my home purchase will maintain value in the event weather warming continues on its current trajectory.
OG: You're good in Philly, except for South Philly which is slightly below sea level and there is some long-term risk.
9- It'd be nice to have a lower overall tax burden although of all the things above I'd give on this first (after all I'm in California now so I'm likely to drop my tax burden post move).
The city-wage tax and other city taxes suck, considering the level of govt services provided, but the state taxes are really reasonable, so it kind of evens out.
Last edited by ArmchairArchitect on Fri Sep 16, 2016 12:50 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by sperry8 » Fri Sep 16, 2016 12:34 pm

orca91 wrote:
sperry8 wrote:Good weather is an area that does not see snow. Boulder has snow and lots of it. 89" annually.

.....

Each of us has our own reasons... for me and adequate reason is material amounts of snow (more than Seattle's few inches) are a non-starter. But I do agree Denver & clearly Boulder would tick my liberal box. Lots of Bay Area folk are moving there now due to prices in both areas.

Due to this thread I have significantly loosened my airport requirement and now am happy anyplace that is within 1 hour of a decent domestic airport. Your thoughts have opened up my eyes in this regard.


Are you against this, as in you never want to see a flake of snow?

I don't think you're realizing what that snowfall means in Boulder and Denver. It does snow there, no doubt. But, it snows in bunches with plenty of inches worth in one falling. And, then it's 60 degrees and sunny the next day and the snow is gone. It's not snow on the ground from Nov. to March.

If you don't have to a job or anything, sit inside on the snow days and enjoy the view. It will be warm again soon.

I lived in the Denver area for 5 years, and reading your list I immediately thought of Denver and especially Boulder, it the liberal city part is that important to you. What do they call it, "The Republic of Boulder"... or, something like that? :happy

I now live in the Seattle area. That or Portland would also fit very well for most of your list. If you don't mind the gray and the rain/drizzle. It rarely gets below freezing... Seattle area at least. It's often 40 for the high and 35 for the low on many days, or similar.

You can probably scratch Spokane off your list. I don't think they're too liberal out there and it can get bitterly cold and snowy over there.


I have a quote that I try to live by... I always want the temperature to be warmer than my age.

While many have told me of Denver's unique weather (lots of sun and more than most realize) it simply appears to be too cold in the winter (especially at night). Winters get into the teens. For me personally, this is just too cold. Add feet of snow to the equation and it's not a good spot for me weather-wise. If I end up swapping seasons like some prior posters suggested (doing summers in the US and winters in Europe) then these two spots could be perfect! They seem to tick many other boxes for me.

Seattle weather is likely the worst I'd tolerate in the US winter. It is on the potential list alongside Portland. Thanks much for your suggestions!
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by BlueCable » Fri Sep 16, 2016 12:36 pm

ArmchairArchitect wrote:Philadelphia by far. It's a real/big city. 3rd largest downtown (this is the better measure, versus cities that have higher population due purely to ridiculously large borders/sprawl, such as Houston or Phoenix).


No -- wikipedia says they get 22.4 inches of snow per year.

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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by btenny » Fri Sep 16, 2016 12:41 pm

As I said earlier I think Davis California meets all your requirements. See below for the links.

Davis is a very liberal town. Ranks 91 out of 5300+ on your scale. A college town so lots of things to do. The school is home to one of the best oenology departments in the world, so great wine and people who love it.

Davis is next door to Sacramento and the Sierras so there are lots of green parks and hiking trails of all kinds. Davis is east of the Bay area and all it's attractions but still close enough for easy access. Oakland International Airport is 68 miles away or 80 miles to San Francisco International.

The winter weather is cool but nice. No snow. December and January are the only cold months and it only gets down to 38 at night and then up to 55 in the day. So quite pleasant IMO.

And finally there is good affordable housing by California standards. Tons of modest homes and condos sell for $300K to $400K.

Good Luck.

https://www.crowdpac.com/games/lookup/h ... avis%2C+Ca
http://www.usclimatedata.com/climate/da ... s/usca0284
https://www.google.com/search?q=davis+t ... ox&ie=&oe=
http://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/Da ... 2_zm/1_fr/

orca91
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by orca91 » Fri Sep 16, 2016 12:44 pm

What do you plan to do in the middle of the night, in retirement, that you're so worried about the low temps? :happy

Understood though. If Seattle weather is tolerable for you, that city/area and the Portland/Vancouver, WA areas would be very fitting for your list.

ArmchairArchitect
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by ArmchairArchitect » Fri Sep 16, 2016 12:47 pm

BlueCable wrote:
ArmchairArchitect wrote:Philadelphia by far. It's a real/big city. 3rd largest downtown (this is the better measure, versus cities that have higher population due purely to ridiculously large borders/sprawl, such as Houston or Phoenix).


No -- wikipedia says they get 22.4 inches of snow per year.


Yes, that's the only criteria not met. See my revised post. You're not going to find a city that hits on all 9 criteria, but Philly hits on 8 out of the 9. So choose what's most important to you.

orca91
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by orca91 » Fri Sep 16, 2016 1:00 pm

What about Scottsdale, AZ?

I'm not sure how liberal they are there, but seemed much less conservative than much or the Phoenix area when I've visited there.

That may meet lots of needs and wants on your list though.

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VictoriaF
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Re: Which city for part time home during retirement?

Post by VictoriaF » Fri Sep 16, 2016 1:18 pm

protagonist wrote:IMHO, winters, though miserable in winter in most of Europe, are more miserable in most of the US.
On the other hand, IMHO, summers are nicer in most of the US than in most of Europe.


In my opinion, it's the opposite.

Winters in the U.S. are difficult for those who have to drive in snow. They need to shovel their driveways, clear their cars, and then drive in difficult conditions of slippery roads and low visibility. Those who live in large cities with walkable streets and good public transportation ignore snow. For example, during Snowmagedon in the metropolitan DC area, suburban dwellers complained, whereas those living in the city went on the streets to have snowball fights. When you are retired and can walk to all your physical and cultural needs, a winter in DC is just fine. The same is probably true for Philadelphia, NYC, and Boston.

Summers on the East coast of the U.S. are too humid and muggy. In contrast, European summers have dry heat which is more tolerable. Many European cities are lined with large buildings and trees, thus providing an opportunity to walk in shade. There are shady areas (no pun intended) on Washington and New York streets, but the humidity does not provide much relief. This August, I spent three weeks in France, Poland and Czech Republic, and I felt fine in all these places throughout the day. Upon return to D.C. I could really feel the difference (not in favor of DC).

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

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