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Re: Honda maintenance schedule?

Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2018 9:29 am
by Chip
CFM300 wrote:
Wed Aug 24, 2016 2:54 pm
Those of you who have 2012 or later (9th Gen) Honda Accords and who follow Maintenance Minder, at what mileage did you receive the "3" code to change your transmission fluid?
Here's an update to this old thread for those who obsess about Honda maintenance :D :

My '13 Accord now has just over 90,000 miles on it. Oil change interval per the Maintenance Minder has continued to be fairly consistent at 10,000 - 10,500 miles (this is changing at 15% oil life per the MM). My last oil change (my 8th with this car) was at 81,500 miles.

I am currently at 30% oil life per the MM. I just checked the upcoming maintenance items by using the "preview" mode and it shows codes A (oil change), 1 (rotate tires), 2 (air filter & cabin air filter, inspect drive belt), and 3 (replace CVT fluid).

This clarifies/corrects some of my comments/assumptions earlier in the thread. I had expected the CVT fluid change to appear at 100k miles instead of 90k. I was also pretty sure that the 3 code didn't appear in preview mode at the previous CVT fluid change interval (50k). But I must have missed it before as I'm definitely seeing it now.

Re: Honda maintenance schedule?

Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2018 10:18 am
by LadyGeek
Chip wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 9:29 am
My '13 Accord now has just over 90,000 miles on it. Oil change interval per the Maintenance Minder has continued to be fairly consistent at 10,000 - 10,500 miles (this is changing at 15% oil life per the MM). My last oil change (my 8th with this car) was at 81,500 miles.
My '12 CR-V has just over 82,000 miles. The oil life maintenance reminder came on a few weeks ago and I changed the oil (and filter). Since the last change, the mileage was 10,475 miles over a 6 month interval.

At the same time as the maintenance reminder, my dash "charging" warning indicator briefly flashed on. :shock: That's an immediate concern, as it flashed again the next day. A quick voltage check showed low battery voltage (12.35 V with the engine off). A few days later, I replaced the 6-year old original battery with a new one.

The new battery measured 12.60 V. I was expecting more than 13 V with a new battery, but a google search says this is OK. The CR-V has a two-stage charging system and maintains battery voltage at 12.60 V.

In any case, now would be a good time to replace an aging battery - before the winter snow hits.

Re: Honda maintenance schedule?

Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2018 10:32 am
by Chip
LadyGeek wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 10:18 am
In any case, now would be a good time to replace an aging battery - before the winter snow hits.
Thanks. I've been a participant in some of the extensive exhaustive exhausting car battery replacement discussions here. :P

My Accord OEM battery failed at 39 months. I attribute that to its tiny size (Group 51R) and the deleterious effects of parasitic electrical drains. I make this observation without a shred of data, of course. :) I am prepared for the next replacement with an already-procured battery hold-down that will allow me to put in a Group 24F battery (OEM in the V-6 Accord).

Agreed that the first few cold snaps in fall are the time to pay very close attention to battery performance. I've caught several failing batteries in the past just by a slight change in starter sounds. I've been told here that I can't count on that. I guess one day I'll find out. But in the meantime the battery in my pickup is going on 9 years (installed 12/09) and is still doing the job.

Re: Honda maintenance schedule?

Posted: Mon Oct 07, 2019 7:31 am
by bdoon51
CFM300 wrote:
Wed Aug 24, 2016 2:54 pm
UPDATE

The original issue of what additional service to get has been answered. And the issue of whether to follow Maintenance Minder has been thoroughly discussed (in this thread and others). But here's a new question that I posed below:

Those of you who have 2012 or later (9th Gen) Honda Accords and who follow Maintenance Minder, at what mileage did you receive the "3" code to change your transmission fluid?

ORIGINAL POST

I have a Honda with 28,000. The original 3-year warranty expires in a few days, so I want to take it in to the dealer to have them look at something.

Maintenance Minder says the oil life is 30%, and so is not displaying any maintenance codes at this time. But I need to get the oil and brake fluid changed anyway. (Owner's manual says change the oil at least once per year, and brake fluid at 3 years.)

My question is: What else should I have done?

I can't rely on MM, because it's not displaying any codes. If I just get the oil and brake fluid changed and have MM reset, then it will assume that I performed the other maintenance that would have been displayed had I waited until the oil life was at 15%.

I've reviewed the owner's manual carefully. There is no maintenance schedule. Just instructions on reading the codes from MM.

Thanks.
Where can I get a printable maintenance schedule for the 2015 6 cylinder? I bought a 2015 6 cyl from a dealer at 16k mileage and they claimed in writing they had performed approximately everything ...however the owner before me (original) left service record from same dealer in car so I had some confidence (I believe little dealers tell me). Thanks

Re: Honda maintenance schedule?

Posted: Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:22 pm
by CFM300
bdoon51 wrote:
Mon Oct 07, 2019 7:31 am
Where can I get a printable maintenance schedule for the 2015 6 cylinder?
Why not just Google "maintenance schedule for the 2015 6 cylinder Accord"?

Re: Honda maintenance schedule?

Posted: Wed Oct 09, 2019 11:16 pm
by helloeveryone
LadyGeek wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 10:18 am
Chip wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 9:29 am
My '13 Accord now has just over 90,000 miles on it. Oil change interval per the Maintenance Minder has continued to be fairly consistent at 10,000 - 10,500 miles (this is changing at 15% oil life per the MM). My last oil change (my 8th with this car) was at 81,500 miles.
My '12 CR-V has just over 82,000 miles. The oil life maintenance reminder came on a few weeks ago and I changed the oil (and filter). Since the last change, the mileage was 10,475 miles over a 6 month interval.

At the same time as the maintenance reminder, my dash "charging" warning indicator briefly flashed on. :shock: That's an immediate concern, as it flashed again the next day. A quick voltage check showed low battery voltage (12.35 V with the engine off). A few days later, I replaced the 6-year old original battery with a new one.

The new battery measured 12.60 V. I was expecting more than 13 V with a new battery, but a google search says this is OK. The CR-V has a two-stage charging system and maintains battery voltage at 12.60 V.

In any case, now would be a good time to replace an aging battery - before the winter snow hits.
Nice! I’ve not had a car battery last six years

Re: Honda maintenance schedule?

Posted: Thu Oct 10, 2019 7:06 am
by sschoe2
I disagree with MM on the transmission change schedule. At 50k I did not like the color of the fluid that came out so I ended up doing 3 drain and fills to completely replace it. I'd recommend doing a drain and fill every 15k miles. It is easier than an oil change as there is no filter. Just unscrew the plug, drain, fill.

Re: Honda maintenance schedule?

Posted: Thu Oct 10, 2019 2:06 pm
by inbox788
LadyGeek wrote:
Fri Aug 26, 2016 1:56 pm
sunny_socal wrote:...I wouldn't worry about it, obviously they just stuck the wrong (boilerplate) form in your car. As for the PSI - be thankful they're actually a little high! (Indeed to be sure you should learn to check them yourself, just get a $5 gauge next time to stop for gas.) I run all my tires @ 40 PSI if the max sidewall is 44, 45 PSI if the max sidewall is 50, 75 PSI if the max sidewall is 80. The door jamb pressures are only applicable for the tires that came with the car and for those wanting a plush ride. It has more to do with liability than anything else - the manufacturer doesn't want another Firestone fiasco on their hands.
No, the pressure is determined by the engineers - not lawyers. This is not good advice. See: What Air Pressure Should I Use in My Tires? or google "correct tire pressure"
I'm with sunny_socal on this one. I aim about 2-4 above the door jamb figure (the number car engineers recommend) which is usually far below the max tire pressure (the number tire engineers have determined). There are all sorts of tradeoffs, but a few psi is minor IMO, and I like to err on the side of a firmer ride starting and wider margin before it gets too low. Also, with the low pressure tire pressure sensors, I seldom bother to check the tires anymore. :shock: Costs $200 to have them replaced, so might as well take advantage of the new tech (annoying expense like keys/fobs and other advanced features that's big profit for the parts and service departments).

Anyway, this time of year, I might need to top off the tires once and again in winter, but the heat expansion often balances the slow leakage so I can go 6 months without bothering in the spring/summer (I really don't, but it's good to know you can, and I don't stress over it). YMMV

And if you have the newer monitoring systems, they give you specific pressure readouts for each individual tires. There's even one that honks the horn when you've reach the correct pressure.

Between good tires and new tech, the OCD tire checks have gone the way of the 3000 mile oil change for me. I still eyeball the tires and spot check as needed, but I'm not checking them regularly with every gas fillup. I remember the days when oil needed to be checked and/or added whenever gas was added; now it's been years since I've had to add oil between changes. I'm reminded, as I was reading about microplastic plastic polution in the ocean and the amount of tire and brake dust found, I thought about hybrid/electric cars having "lifetime" brake pads from little use. So aside from worrying less about checking for brake pad wear and replacement, it's another small benefit to the planet over conventional cars. Great when less is more.