What Book Are YOU Currently Reading? PART II

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Locked
User avatar
johnoutk
Posts: 322
Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 8:16 am

Post by johnoutk » Wed Aug 12, 2009 4:36 pm

sleepdoc wrote:
johnoutk wrote:The Terror by Dan Simmons
Recently read this one myself, greatly enjoyed it. I think I found the rec here. Historical novel about arctic explorers stuck on the ice waiting for the thaw, with "something" out there. Well done.
Yeah, Dan Simmons is quite a talent IMO. I thought this was pretty solid until the ending. It ended up being a bit too long, and I wasn't impressed how he wrapped things up.

chaz
Posts: 13604
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 2:44 pm

Post by chaz » Wed Aug 12, 2009 5:26 pm

"Suite Francaise" by Irene Nemirovsky.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

medgar
Posts: 206
Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2008 2:38 pm

Post by medgar » Wed Aug 12, 2009 6:46 pm

Just finished The Art Of Racing in the Rain by Stein. It is told from the family dog perspective. If you are a dog lover it is a good read.

Medgar

User avatar
VictoriaF
Posts: 19062
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Post by VictoriaF » Thu Aug 13, 2009 11:50 am

chaz wrote:"Suite Francaise" by Irene Nemirovsky.
Chaz,

How did you like it?

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

chaz
Posts: 13604
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 2:44 pm

Post by chaz » Thu Aug 13, 2009 12:09 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
chaz wrote:"Suite Francaise" by Irene Nemirovsky.
Chaz,

How did you like it?

Victoria
It is very touching, knowing the history of the author and her family. It is an emotional experience of the 1st order, even delaying my ability to get to sleep at night.

Have you read it? If not, I recommend it.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

User avatar
Tall Grass
Posts: 1205
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2008 8:11 pm
Location: Kansas

Post by Tall Grass » Thu Aug 13, 2009 10:44 pm

nisiprius wrote:
Tall Grass wrote:"The Joyful Christian" a collection of observations and book excerpts from the writings of C.S. Lewis...
"Joyful" being an intentional pun on his wife's name?

I had a strange experience. I was reading a novel entitled Nightmare Alley, by one William Lindsay Gresham, in a neat Library of America collection entitled Crime Novels: American Noir of the 1930s & 1940s, and noticed the dedication to his wife, Joy Davidson. Something kept nagging and nagging and nagging at me and I couldn't figure out what it was until I read the capsule bio of Gresham at the end the book.
Hmmmm...there was a great old movie starring Tyrone Power with the same name; is it the same as the book? Was it about a heartless carnival charlatan posing as a mystic and soothsayer?
"A wise man should have money in his head, but not in his heart." - Jonathan Swift

User avatar
LH
Posts: 5490
Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2007 2:54 am

Post by LH » Fri Aug 14, 2009 3:08 am

Ignore Everybody: and 39 Other Keys to Creativity

This was a cool easy book I read today while waiting for my car to get its tires rotated and realigned.

User avatar
VictoriaF
Posts: 19062
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Post by VictoriaF » Fri Aug 14, 2009 6:04 am

chaz wrote:
VictoriaF wrote:
chaz wrote:"Suite Francaise" by Irene Nemirovsky.
Chaz,

How did you like it?

Victoria
It is very touching, knowing the history of the author and her family. It is an emotional experience of the 1st order, even delaying my ability to get to sleep at night.

Have you read it? If not, I recommend it.
Thank you, Chaz.

It is on my list to read, but so are lots of other books. With your recommendation, it moved up ;)

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

User avatar
foodnerd
Posts: 433
Joined: Sat Nov 17, 2007 5:16 pm
Location: Northwest Arkansas

Post by foodnerd » Mon Aug 17, 2009 9:37 pm

Just finished " A True History of Chocolate".

http://www.amazon.com/True-History-Choc ... 744&sr=8-1

I thought the information on the Mayan / Aztec use of chocolate and the Spanish Conquest / Adoption of Chocolate by Europe very interesting. But the authors only gave about 15 to 18 pages to last two hundreds years where all of the innovation and expansion of chocolate production was created. Nothing about Hershery and Mars fighting it out in the 30's through 60's.

So, my review is that if you like colonial history, this book was great. But if you like the science and manufacturer of food items, not so much! :roll:

FN

P.S. - Now I am going to start Character Counts by Saint Jack.

chaz
Posts: 13604
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 2:44 pm

Post by chaz » Tue Aug 18, 2009 12:30 pm

"The Last Templar" by Raymond Khoury.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

Analystic
Posts: 224
Joined: Sat May 09, 2009 6:35 am

Post by Analystic » Fri Aug 21, 2009 1:18 am

Spycraft.
Disclaimer: I am making all of this up.

gkaplan
Posts: 7034
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2007 8:34 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon

Post by gkaplan » Fri Aug 21, 2009 7:53 am

P. D. James' Death of an Expert Witness
Gordon

Valuethinker
Posts: 39223
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 11:07 am

Post by Valuethinker » Fri Aug 21, 2009 11:12 am

LH wrote:
Valuethinker wrote:
LH wrote:Finished the History of the Peloponnesian War war by thucydides. It is a book that I have started several times in my life (off the internet), only to give up, as the names of people and places, the history, were too obtuse to make comphrensible reading.

I finally read 3 or more ancient greece books, studied the area a bit on wiki and such, and finally could read this book (I am intending to go to greece at some point).

It was well worth the read, especially at the end, with the athenians gettting decimated at sicily. I will have to revist this opinion in a year or more, but it ranks up with The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire by Gibbons, those two are some of the most illuminating books I have ever read. It presents politics at its most real and fundamental levels, something we do not experience per se because we are the most powerful currently, and are under no real threat of national existance from external invasion (we could nuke each other of course, but not any rational type threat). "treaties" that are broken near immediately (not worth the paper they are written on) and yet are remade, often to last 100 years, or 30 years, or 10 days. To principled dialogue about threats of decimation and slavery, that result often in decimation and slavery. Casual mentions of entire cities of men being put to the sword, women and children enslaved, followed near the end by the athenians being decimated and enslaved at syracuse, which personifies it more.

These same things still happen today, in rwanda, in crotia, and if we are not careful, here as well. Its just universal. Nothing has fundamentally changed. Call the UN, russia has occupied and stolen parts of the country of Georgia! Heh.


I can see why this book is still around after near 2500 years. I am very glad I read it.
As long as you recognize Gibbons is pushing his own particular view of history eg that the rise of Christianity killed the Roman Empire.

Lots of what Gibbons says doesn't stack up.

The book is best read as literature.

On Thucydides he is awe-inspiring. However Herodotus has stood up better to more recent commentary (a lot of what we though Herodotus was making up about foreign countries, turns out to have been true).

Again Thucydides is pushing his view, and he was a disgraced general. And we have no other sources for the events Thucydides describes. Other than archaeological evidence.
What view was Thucydides pushing? Reading it, I did not get a sense of any view, he seemed even handed between the athenians and pelopensians. It seemed factual, that it is the only account basically seems largely true, but I think I have read on wiki or some modern ancient greece book that it was regarded as even handed in its time.
Ok the problem is we cannot fact check Thucydides in great detail. He is the only source.

But he was kicked out of Athens by the demagogues, and so his axe to grind is that the demagogues started the war, and lost it. Athens was too democratic in his view.

With Herodotus, he wrote all these fanciful histories about strange places. Now, modern archaeological research has confirmed a lot of what he wrote eg about the tribes that lived in the Crimea region, smoked pot, were ruled by women etc.

When you read it, what view did you personally think he was pushing? I am not talking about what you may have read others thought he was "pushing" but what you thought when you read it.

To be a scholar in ancient greece, I wouls posit one has to figure out some sort of new angle, or just re-re-rewrite was has already been rewritten over the past 2000 years. Also one has to deal with some current PC type issues and such. Most of the angles in the books seem to tell more about our current age and current history professors than they do with 2000 years ago.
But that is also true about Gibbons (18th century writer) and about Thucydides (the Victorians loved him). We thought Herodotus was wrong (turns out he was truthful) and that Thucydides was telling the truth (where we can crosscheck, he's slanting it).

Gibbon had this master plan of why the Roman Empire fell: immorality, rise of Christianity etc. The Victorians loved this stuff: homosexuality finished off the Romans etc.

More recent scholarship points out the Greeks were even bigger shirt lifters, and the picture of how and why the Roman Empire fell is not clear. Lots of interesting research re soil erosion etc. that the Christians were not a force early enough, nor so disuniting.

The Romans thought the Christians were another bl--dy Jewish cult (which they were) and they had, of course, crushed the Jews pretty decisively in 70-72.

It's likely the rise of Christianity had much to do with the falling apart of the Roman Empire (effect, not cause). A cult like religion that people turned to when everything else was going to pot.

We also find that the 'barbarian invasions' were, in fact, a result of the barbarians being invited in to resettle areas that had been depopulated by other forces, and by civil wars. They didn't so much as knock down the Roman Empire, as settle in the ruins.

The argument rages re internal v. external forces, but I think most classical historians would lean towards the internecine civil wars which raged, plus factors like soil depravation, climate change (there's a big tsunami in 386 and a corresponding drying up of a lot of the Mediterranean).

There's also something of a political breakdown going on eg the Army getting more caste-like. The Romans just seemed to lose their military edge, again perhaps because the Army got better at civil wars and palace coups than at beating the enemies of Rome.

The westward migration of the Goths was often quite peaceful with local governors inviting them to settle within the Empire. Intermarriage of ruling classes etc.
In terms of herodotus having "stood up better" do you mean better than Thucydides has? Or better than some prior views of Herotodus?
Both. We are less certain that Th. was telling us the truth, and more certain that Herodotus was telling us things he had truly heard (which weren't always true, but more stack up than we thought).

We're not sure, now, who is the more reliable witness.
In terms of Gibbons - what are the main things that do not stack up? Did you study it in college, or read it at some point and then read critiques of it? Or is it just wiki and googling about it now? Just wondering.

Interesting stuff : )

LH
Gibbons was a long time ago in my reading. But even then, one didn't read it for 'classical history'. After all, he wasn't there.

And we've uncovered both archaeological evidence and documentary evidence since he wrote. We have his source texts, and others.

It's a bit like writing a biography of Arthur using Geoffrey Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain. Monmouth wrote in the 11th Century, King Arthur lived in the 6th.

User avatar
norookie
Posts: 3016
Joined: Tue Jul 07, 2009 1:55 pm

Post by norookie » Fri Aug 21, 2009 11:50 am

Lonsome Dove"........I wanted to read it, it was better than the TV series.

User avatar
VictoriaF
Posts: 19062
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

"I Am Charlotte Simmons"

Post by VictoriaF » Fri Aug 21, 2009 1:18 pm

Tom Wolfe, "I Am Charlotte Simmons: A Novel".

Victoria
Last edited by VictoriaF on Fri Aug 21, 2009 9:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

chuck h
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Mar 20, 2009 9:13 am

Post by chuck h » Fri Aug 21, 2009 3:09 pm

"Vietnam" by John Prados

chaz
Posts: 13604
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 2:44 pm

Post by chaz » Mon Aug 24, 2009 2:19 pm

"Writ of Execution" by Perri O'shaughnessy.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

bmb
Posts: 637
Joined: Wed May 06, 2009 2:35 pm

Post by bmb » Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:05 pm

"That Old Cape Magic" by Richard Russo
"Big History" by Cynthia Brown
"The Return of Depression Economics" (updated edition) by Paul Krugman

User avatar
stratton
Posts: 11083
Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2007 5:05 pm
Location: Puget Sound

Post by stratton » Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:14 pm

The Essays of Warren Buffett organized by Lawrence Cunningham.

Paul

chaz
Posts: 13604
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 2:44 pm

Post by chaz » Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:56 pm

Finishing "Writ of Execution". Next will be "Critical Mass" by Steve Martini.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

chaz
Posts: 13604
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 2:44 pm

Post by chaz » Wed Aug 26, 2009 2:48 pm

"Dead Irish" by John Lescroart.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

medgar
Posts: 206
Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2008 2:38 pm

Post by medgar » Wed Aug 26, 2009 3:41 pm

Fields of Honor-good starting point for a narrative on the major battles of the civil war.

Told by an expert with over 30 years of experience in giving tours on the civil war sites to presidents, civil war historians etc.

norm
Posts: 594
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 7:10 pm

Post by norm » Wed Aug 26, 2009 4:16 pm

I just finished "South of Broad" by Pat Conroy which I highly recommend.

Now reading "The Increment" by David Ignatius, a spy novel about the Iranian nuclear program.

notPatience
Posts: 126
Joined: Mon Mar 24, 2008 2:46 pm

Post by notPatience » Wed Aug 26, 2009 5:11 pm

Just finished "The Girl Who Played With Fire" by Stieg Larsson. (Sequel to "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo"

chaz
Posts: 13604
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 2:44 pm

Post by chaz » Sun Aug 30, 2009 10:54 am

"The Sanctuary" by Raymond Khoury.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

User avatar
catdude
Posts: 1768
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2007 8:11 pm
Location: Central Oregon

Post by catdude » Sun Aug 30, 2009 2:10 pm

A. Lincoln: A Biography, by Ronald C. White.
catdude | | "As much as cats fight, there always seems to be plenty of kittens." (Abraham Lincoln)

User avatar
Judsen
Posts: 862
Joined: Sat Feb 24, 2007 8:29 am
Location: Birmingham, Al.

Post by Judsen » Sun Aug 30, 2009 3:20 pm

"The Good Society" by John K. Galbraith
Be the change you want to see in the world

User avatar
nisiprius
Advisory Board
Posts: 39739
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2007 9:33 am
Location: The terrestrial, globular, planetary hunk of matter, flattened at the poles, is my abode.--O. Henry

Post by nisiprius » Sun Aug 30, 2009 3:28 pm

Just finished Patrick O'Brian's The Letter of Marque, The Thirteen-Gun Salute, The Nutmeg of Consolation, with perhaps some Bogleheadish interest in the investment and banking subplots. My wife, bless her heart, gave me a copy of Dean King's A Sea of Words, which has the double effect of satisfying my curiosity and slowing down my reading of the series, which is important as I realize with dismay that I'm now halfway through the series and don't know how I will cope when I finish it.

Oh, and I'm also reading William Bernstein's The Four Pillars of Investing, and my gosh is it good. It's as good as everyone says it is. I do think it may be the best investment book I've ever read.

Am I the only one who thinks the cover design is ugly? The way the title lines overlap the pillars, particularly on the right, just looks wrong to me. Oddly enough, in many online thumbnails the pillars are printed much more lightly than on the actual dust jacket and don't look as bad...

Image
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

User avatar
VictoriaF
Posts: 19062
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Post by VictoriaF » Sun Aug 30, 2009 4:00 pm

Anne Tyler "The Amateur Marriage."

Victoria
Last edited by VictoriaF on Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

tj218
Posts: 430
Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2007 6:27 pm

Post by tj218 » Sun Aug 30, 2009 4:01 pm

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

chaz
Posts: 13604
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 2:44 pm

Post by chaz » Sun Aug 30, 2009 5:20 pm

nisiprius wrote:Just finished Patrick O'Brian's The Letter of Marque, The Thirteen-Gun Salute, The Nutmeg of Consolation, with perhaps some Bogleheadish interest in the investment and banking subplots. My wife, bless her heart, gave me a copy of Dean King's A Sea of Words, which has the double effect of satisfying my curiosity and slowing down my reading of the series, which is important as I realize with dismay that I'm now halfway through the series and don't know how I will cope when I finish it.

Oh, and I'm also reading William Bernstein's The Four Pillars of Investing, and my gosh is it good. It's as good as everyone says it is. I do think it may be the best investment book I've ever read.

Am I the only one who thinks the cover design is ugly? The way the title lines overlap the pillars, particularly on the right, just looks wrong to me. Oddly enough, in many online thumbnails the pillars are printed much more lightly than on the actual dust jacket and don't look as bad...

Image
4 Pillars is the best investment book I've ever read.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

User avatar
Robert The Bruce
Posts: 86
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2007 7:49 pm

Post by Robert The Bruce » Sun Aug 30, 2009 6:10 pm

I recently finished The World is Curved by David Smick.

Not to discourage you but I was underwhelmed, although he implys he was the true insider in politics and finance for the last 25 years he left me with little insight as to what the future might hold.

http://www.amazon.com/World-Curved-Hidd ... PM34TNBHD0
The stone age didn't end for lack of stone.

Sam I Am
Posts: 2062
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 7:58 pm

Post by Sam I Am » Sun Aug 30, 2009 6:59 pm

Message deleted.
Last edited by Sam I Am on Sat Oct 05, 2013 4:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.

traineeinvestor
Posts: 508
Joined: Wed Nov 26, 2008 8:52 am
Location: Hong Kong
Contact:

Post by traineeinvestor » Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:20 pm

"Paper, rock scissors,: game theory in everyday life" by Len Fisher.

A bit basic, but an enjoyable read.

User avatar
nisiprius
Advisory Board
Posts: 39739
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2007 9:33 am
Location: The terrestrial, globular, planetary hunk of matter, flattened at the poles, is my abode.--O. Henry

Post by nisiprius » Sun Aug 30, 2009 9:09 pm

Tall Grass wrote:
nisiprius wrote:I had a strange experience. I was reading a novel entitled Nightmare Alley, by one William Lindsay Gresham, in a neat Library of America collection entitled Crime Novels: American Noir of the 1930s & 1940s, and noticed the dedication to his wife, Joy Davidson. Something kept nagging and nagging and nagging at me and I couldn't figure out what it was until I read the capsule bio of Gresham at the end the book.
Hmmmm...there was a great old movie starring Tyrone Power with the same name; is it the same as the book? Was it about a heartless carnival charlatan posing as a mystic and soothsayer?
Yes.
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

metabasalt
Posts: 290
Joined: Fri Feb 27, 2009 12:57 pm

Post by metabasalt » Mon Aug 31, 2009 11:08 am

nisiprius wrote: Oh, and I'm also reading William Bernstein's The Four Pillars of Investing, and my gosh is it good. It's as good as everyone says it is. I do think it may be the best investment book I've ever read.

Am I the only one who thinks the cover design is ugly? The way the title lines overlap the pillars, particularly on the right, just looks wrong to me. Oddly enough, in many online thumbnails the pillars are printed much more lightly than on the actual dust jacket and don't look as bad...

Image
Well the cover does look like about all of 30 seconds was put into the 'design'........

But you've convinced me to give it a read, regardless of the cover. I did start on his newest book but got distracted somewhere along the line and never finished it.

User avatar
VictoriaF
Posts: 19062
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Post by VictoriaF » Mon Aug 31, 2009 11:57 am

del
Last edited by VictoriaF on Tue Sep 01, 2009 9:23 pm, edited 3 times in total.

johnjtaylorus
Posts: 620
Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2008 12:44 pm
Location: washington, dc

Post by johnjtaylorus » Mon Aug 31, 2009 12:03 pm

The Gilded Leaf.

User avatar
runthetrails
Posts: 591
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 12:51 pm
Location: Tennessee

Post by runthetrails » Mon Aug 31, 2009 2:05 pm

Younger Next Year by Crowley and Lodge

Picked this up over the weekend and am still reading, but it looks to be more motivational and less informative. Bottom line the authors are advocating that as we age it is ever more important to eat better and exercise, preferably strenuously, 6 days per week.

Still has some helpful imagery, although I don't know how scientific it is. One of the authors is a physician. Basically, when we are sedentary we send our muscles, bones, etc a trickle of a signal indicating tissue damage and telling them to break down and erode. This constant weak signal to catabolize tissue accelerates as we age. After vigorous exercise we send a stronger version of the same breakdown signal throughout the body, but there is a resulting opposite signal which follows it and tells the body to build back up. The signal to build up after exercise is larger than the signal to break down that precedes it, resulting in a net gain of muscle tissue, bone density, etc. By exercising 6 days a week one is supposed to avoid or greatly postpone much of the effect of aging on the body.

Worth a read if you can pick up a copy at the local library or pick one up used. I don't think I'd buy it new if I had it to do over. But it has motivated me to work to increase my workouts from 4x per week to 6x, adding some weight lifting to my running and yoga.

User avatar
CountryBoy
Posts: 1777
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 10:21 am
Location: NY

Post by CountryBoy » Mon Aug 31, 2009 6:00 pm

Barnaby Rudge by Charles Dickens

User avatar
Fbone
Posts: 591
Joined: Sat Jun 20, 2009 4:12 pm

Post by Fbone » Tue Sep 01, 2009 12:40 am

Dragonflight. One of the Pern books.

Boring. Suffering.

notPatience
Posts: 126
Joined: Mon Mar 24, 2008 2:46 pm

Post by notPatience » Tue Sep 01, 2009 1:49 am

Finished SING THEM HOME. Starting THE THIRTEENTH TALE.

gkaplan
Posts: 7034
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2007 8:34 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon

Post by gkaplan » Tue Sep 01, 2009 6:08 am

I've just started Elizabeth George's A Traitor to Memory.
Gordon

chaz
Posts: 13604
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 2:44 pm

Post by chaz » Tue Sep 01, 2009 9:38 am

gkaplan wrote:I've just started Elizabeth George's A Traitor to Memory.
I enjoyed this one and all of the books by Ms. George.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

grok87
Posts: 8915
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 9:00 pm

Post by grok87 » Tue Sep 01, 2009 9:14 pm

Fbone wrote:Dragonflight. One of the Pern books.

Boring. Suffering.
I read them as a teen. They get better I think. Maybe start with the White Dragon?
cheers,
RIP Mr. Bogle.

grok87
Posts: 8915
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 9:00 pm

21

Post by grok87 » Tue Sep 01, 2009 9:16 pm

21: The final unfinished voyage of Jack Aubrey...

I was on the fence as to whether to read this one (after reading the 20 books in the series). It was well worth it...
cheers,
RIP Mr. Bogle.

Mister Roper
Posts: 21
Joined: Wed Aug 12, 2009 11:11 pm

Post by Mister Roper » Wed Sep 02, 2009 12:58 am

I recently read "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time" by Mark Haddon. I think I enjoyed it as much as any fiction I have ever read. It is a quick and thoroughly enjoyable read. I highly recommend it.

Slim5819
Posts: 8
Joined: Fri Jul 10, 2009 12:28 pm

Post by Slim5819 » Wed Sep 02, 2009 2:34 pm

I'm currently reading Sinclair Lewis's book It Can't Happen Here written in 1935 about a politician who is elected President of the U.S. and who seeks to turn it into a Fascist state.

User avatar
nisiprius
Advisory Board
Posts: 39739
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2007 9:33 am
Location: The terrestrial, globular, planetary hunk of matter, flattened at the poles, is my abode.--O. Henry

Re: 21

Post by nisiprius » Wed Sep 02, 2009 4:05 pm

grok87 wrote:21: The final unfinished voyage of Jack Aubrey...

I was on the fence as to whether to read this one (after reading the 20 books in the series). It was well worth it...
cheers,
Well, what on earth are you going to do now that you've finished them? I'm just checked out The Truelove and The Wine-Dark Sea from the library and am starting to worry about being more than halfway through. Fortunately my wife gave me a copy of A Sea of Words, a book by Dean King that defines many of the words and has a lot of background information on sailing, surgery in the 1800s, etc. and that will slow me down as I constantly stop reading to look stuff up.

I'm currently reading Matthew Pearl's The Last Dickens, because I had to get The Truelove through interlibrary loan and needed something to read while it was arriving.
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

chaz
Posts: 13604
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 2:44 pm

Post by chaz » Wed Sep 02, 2009 4:10 pm

Cat and Mouse" by James Patterson.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

Locked