What Book Are YOU Currently Reading? PART II

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
mikec
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Post by mikec » Thu Aug 14, 2008 9:11 am

For books about the Iraq war, no book is better then House to House by Ballavias.

This is a personal narrative by Staff Sargent Bellavias' squad in the taking of Fallujah. It is just riveting and scary. I didn't understand how good the US Army soldiers are or how difficult the fighting was.

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johnoutk
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Post by johnoutk » Fri Aug 15, 2008 6:21 pm

'The Undercover Economist' by Tim Harford
also rereading 'Watchmen' by Alan Moore

taxman
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Post by taxman » Fri Aug 15, 2008 11:02 pm

"When mkts collied"....its been said , who knows, but ""The Plan"" by the writer of "Hill Street Blues" Stephen J Cannall was good spin yrs ago. :)

Pangloss
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Post by Pangloss » Sat Aug 16, 2008 12:57 pm

I'm about half way through with Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions by Dan Ariely. So far it's great.

tj218
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Post by tj218 » Sun Aug 17, 2008 9:53 pm

Currently trying to read "classics" that I feel I should have knowledge of.


Recently finished: The Caine Mutiny, by Herman Wouk. This may be one of the best books I have ever read. If you haven't read it, I suggest you take a look at it.


Currently "reading": Catch-22 by Heller......I fell for the hype on this one, this is very repetitive. The theme is interesting, and occasionally produces a chuckle (Major Major Major) but after 120+ pages I am about to give up. I just don't understand the love for this book.


Next: A Farewell to Arms by Hemingway.

Die Hard
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Post by Die Hard » Sun Aug 17, 2008 10:00 pm

The World Is Your Oyster: The Guide to Finding Great Investments Around the Globe
by
Jeff D. Opdyke
The best way to teach your children about money is to not have any.............

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Jethro2007
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Post by Jethro2007 » Mon Aug 18, 2008 12:13 pm

Hey all,

tj218, kudos on reading the classics...

Catch-22 was written at a time when whistleblowers and shedding light on gross, inhumane situations just wasnt standard practice...It was so uncommon that the phrase Catch-22 was adopted by society(I saw the movie)...Sorry, I found the language of Hawthorne and other older classics frustrating and tiring to slog through, also...

I remember reading, The Sun Also Rises, and seemed to enjoy it...maybe give it a try...I would recommend Dispatches; viet nam era..

tj218
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Post by tj218 » Mon Aug 18, 2008 1:10 pm

Jethro2007 wrote:Hey all,

tj218, kudos on reading the classics...

Catch-22 was written at a time when whistleblowers and shedding light on gross, inhumane situations just wasnt standard practice...It was so uncommon that the phrase Catch-22 was adopted by society(I saw the movie)...Sorry, I found the language of Hawthorne and other older classics frustrating and tiring to slog through, also...

I remember reading, The Sun Also Rises, and seemed to enjoy it...maybe give it a try...I would recommend Dispatches; viet nam era..

I can certainly see the appeal of Catch-22 as an anti-establishment type of book. As I was not born when this was first published (or for many years thereafter) it does not strike a chord like perhaps it does for older generations.

While the concept was rather innovative in 1961, in 2008 it feels dated. That being said, the last 100 pages or so (up to 250) have been better, I haven't given up on it yet.

I could certainly see a case for putting Catch-22 on a list of "Most Influential Novels", but not on a list of best novels.


Thanks for the suggestions, I'll add them to my list. I am by no means getting to all the classics, as I too have difficulty with Hawthorne and a lot of 19th century works (Reading Dickens is a struggle in keeping the eyes open.)

bluemarlin08
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Post by bluemarlin08 » Mon Aug 18, 2008 8:59 pm

Just finished a great read, Sandra Brown's Crush. Would have been a great beach read. Read another good one, Tea With Terrorist.

grok87
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Post by grok87 » Mon Aug 18, 2008 9:11 pm

Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follet (just finished)- great read!!!
I'm most of the way through the letters of JRR Tolkien- fascinating, a must read for Tolkien fans. Someone on this forum recommended it to me and I'm very grateful...
cheers
grok

chaz
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Post by chaz » Tue Aug 19, 2008 10:52 am

"Absolute Power" by David Balducci.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

bluemarlin08
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Post by bluemarlin08 » Tue Aug 19, 2008 12:09 pm

All of Balducci's stuff is pretty good.

chaz
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Post by chaz » Tue Aug 19, 2008 12:49 pm

bluemarlin08, I agree.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

gkaplan
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Post by gkaplan » Tue Aug 19, 2008 4:06 pm

A Suitable Vengeance by Elizabeth George.
Gordon

chaz
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Post by chaz » Tue Aug 19, 2008 4:52 pm

Gordon, I just finished that book. Elizabeth George is a terrific writer.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

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bcboy57
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Wall Street

Post by bcboy57 » Tue Aug 19, 2008 5:39 pm

Wall Street- by Steve Fraser. A short history about the history and characters on 'the Street'. About 1/2 done but a good read.

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Jethro2007
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Post by Jethro2007 » Thu Aug 21, 2008 4:26 am

Hey all,

Gist finished reading Generation Kill...

I would recommend it as an informative read about our most recent armed conflict and an elite unit, but as literature, it truly pales in comparison to Dispatches...

That someone would compare it to Dispatches, would be like comparing a make out session with yer sister to the real thing...ah, it just doesnt do it fer me...Its more paint by numbers than Masterpiece....

I appreciate the authors efforts; But do not understand how M. Herr, who spent much more time in Nam(years), covering a larger war, and interviewing hundreds of officers and enlisted, needed 70 fewer pages to beautifully illustrate and define "our mission" there, than said author of GK...who spent maybe 2 months in-country...Yet, the war is still going on...

It saddens me to think, that it is to be exploited into a mini-series;
Because its basically ghost writing the experiences of those few who served, for what ever their personal reasons, and very little of the authors own input...

This war is still waiting for its own Dispatches...sorry...

SamB
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Post by SamB » Thu Aug 21, 2008 9:31 am

Finally got around to reading Ayn Rand's "Atlas Shrugged," recently, Joyce Carol Oates' "The Grave Digger's Daughter," and now I am back to Rand - "The Fountainhead." It sure beats reading investment books.

Sam

marie17
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Post by marie17 » Thu Aug 21, 2008 10:07 am

tj218, I am an avid reader, and easily read about 25-30 books per year. I have tried to read Catch-22 no less than 5 times. I've gotten in over a hundred pages, but have never succeeded.

Don't feel bad if you put it down.

Its still sitting on my bookshelf, staring at me. That, Naked Lunch, and Clockwork Orange. Three "classics" that I simply could not read.
Last edited by marie17 on Thu Aug 21, 2008 12:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Valuethinker
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Post by Valuethinker » Thu Aug 21, 2008 11:26 am

Jethro2007 wrote:Hey all,

Gist finished reading Generation Kill...

I would recommend it as an informative read about our most recent armed conflict and an elite unit, but as literature, it truly pales in comparison to Dispatches...

That someone would compare it to Dispatches, would be like comparing a make out session with yer sister to the real thing...ah, it just doesnt do it fer me...Its more paint by numbers than Masterpiece....

I appreciate the authors efforts; But do not understand how M. Herr, who spent much more time in Nam(years), covering a larger war, and interviewing hundreds of officers and enlisted, needed 70 fewer pages to beautifully illustrate and define "our mission" there, than said author of GK...who spent maybe 2 months in-country...Yet, the war is still going on...

It saddens me to think, that it is to be exploited into a mini-series;
Because its basically ghost writing the experiences of those few who served, for what ever their personal reasons, and very little of the authors own input...

This war is still waiting for its own Dispatches...sorry...

A number of vets have called Herr's book 'complete BS'.

It is certainly 'new journalism' and you can see its effects in the script he wrote for Apocalypse Now.

So there is a surrealism about it which makes it less trustworthy, even though I agree it is great literature.

Now as to 'generation Kill'. Not great literature, but good reportage. Think some of the WWII reporters like John Steinbeck or Alan Moorhead or (name escapes me, the woman correspondent --famous-- Martha Gellhorn).

So I think it sits comfortably amongst those.

From the critics, the problem with the HBO series is that it sanitizes out some of the tougher stuff in the book: the soldiers feelings after they shoot innocents etc.

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Jethro2007
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Post by Jethro2007 » Thu Aug 21, 2008 12:32 pm

Hey all,

Easy now, valuethinker, I am not trying to offend anyone...Take back on 'paint by numbers'...

M. Herr wrote the narrative of the Captain Williard character, the voice over bits...Thats it...The screenplay was adapted from J. Conrad's Heart of Darkness...And some stuff, in movie, was in response to Heart of Darkness...
Like one T.S. Eliot poem...

My bad, he only spent one year in-country...and probably condensed his book for his articles written for Esquire...Some may say its pure bs, some REMFs...
How many served in Nam, over 2.1 million??? Gonna be a couple disagreements with that number of people...

I would have to say that the author of Generation Kill, also, found war to be surrealistic...

40 years later; We are not drafting our soldiers, the soldier/grunt pool is less African American and has moved onto the next minority, Latin American...An Army of Juan...The training of some units and some officers is better...But, most of the rest is pretty similiar...not to gloss over anything or give too much away...Amazing technology, but the dark nature of the warrior at the trigger/bombsight...

Our Presidential leadership, sadly..pretty much the same...I guess thats our fault...

I liked Generation Kill, for what it reported...The stuff my government didnt see fit to share with its people...

Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both. -Benjamin Franklin

Valuethinker
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Post by Valuethinker » Thu Aug 21, 2008 4:16 pm

Jethro2007 wrote:Hey all,

Easy now, valuethinker, I am not trying to offend anyone...Take back on 'paint by numbers'...

M. Herr wrote the narrative of the Captain Williard character, the voice over bits...Thats it...The screenplay was adapted from J. Conrad's Heart of Darkness...And some stuff, in movie, was in response to Heart of Darkness...
Like one T.S. Eliot poem...

My bad, he only spent one year in-country...and probably condensed his book for his articles written for Esquire...Some may say its pure bs, some REMFs...
I think he visited several times? The chapter 'Hell Sucks' about Khe Sanh is a masterpiece (I had thought he wrote for Harpers, but I don't remember).

He wrote more than that for Apocalypse Now, I think. For example, that scene with the surfing and the mortars, that attack on the village. That scene where the VC is screaming on the wire and the grunt kills him with an M40 grenade launcher is straight out of Despatches.
How many served in Nam, over 2.1 million??? Gonna be a couple disagreements with that number of people...

I would have to say that the author of Generation Kill, also, found war to be surrealistic...
I don't remember many surreal moments in the book though. It doesn't feel dream-like, but rather terribly real. Herr by comparison sometimes you wonder what he is writing about.
I liked Generation Kill, for what it reported...The stuff my government didnt see fit to share with its people...
I think it is a different book than Despatches. Maybe it won't wear so well.

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Jethro2007
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Post by Jethro2007 » Thu Aug 21, 2008 5:02 pm

Hey all,

Dispatches, 1977...

Apocalypse Now, 1979...

So they borrowed from his book...
He was on the payroll already...

Po-ta-to...Po-tah-to...

Much respect to all that served the US armed forces in this present conflict, previous and those to come...

I believe we're done here...

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bigRoy
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Post by bigRoy » Fri Aug 22, 2008 4:39 am

Im reading,

International Financial Management from Mcgraw-Hill

Its more of a Informative text actually had to by it for a module at Uni..4 years later and I'm finally starting to take it in.
When it's a question of money, everybody is of the same religion -Voltaire

bluemarlin08
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Post by bluemarlin08 » Fri Aug 22, 2008 12:34 pm

Just finished J Grisham's "Playing for Pizza", great read, I want to hop on a plane to Parma, Italy.

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Raybo
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Post by Raybo » Fri Aug 22, 2008 2:30 pm

Two things.

One, Catch-22 is out as an audio book. I listened to it while on a long bike tour. It is OK but nowhere near as good as Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse 5. Listening to it is hard enough. I must have been real motivated to read it, which I did decades ago.

Second, the most impactful book that I've read (listened to actually) recently was The Siege of Mecca by Yaraslav Trofimov. This is a major world story from 1979 that you have not heard. It puts lots of what is going on today in perspective. Great book listening experience!

Ray
No matter how long the hill, if you keep pedaling you'll eventually get up to the top.

chaz
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Post by chaz » Sat Aug 23, 2008 1:35 pm

"Broken Prey" by John Sandford.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

notPatience
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Post by notPatience » Sat Aug 23, 2008 2:32 pm

Just finished GALLOWS THIEF by Bernard Cornwell. Starting WATER FOR ELEPHANTS.

Less reading that usual because of the Olympics.

Pre-Oly, read PREDICTABLY IRRATIONAL and GIFT OF FEAR.

Started but didn't finish YEAR OF WONDERS (English village during plague) and EVERY SECRET THING (adolescent girls involved in death of a baby, because I'd had more than my fill of depressing reading material.

Good grief -- what is it with this concept that only horrendous events constitute "real" and/or "worthy" reading material? Sick of it. And it's making it harder and harder to find things I want to read.

Was in the mood for a good character-rich mystery -- neither gritty nor silly -- and ended up going back to re-read several from the 1930s.

grok87
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Post by grok87 » Sat Aug 23, 2008 9:51 pm

notPatience wrote:Just finished GALLOWS THIEF by Bernard Cornwell. Starting WATER FOR ELEPHANTS.

Less reading that usual because of the Olympics.

Pre-Oly, read PREDICTABLY IRRATIONAL and GIFT OF FEAR.

Started but didn't finish YEAR OF WONDERS (English village during plague) and EVERY SECRET THING (adolescent girls involved in death of a baby, because I'd had more than my fill of depressing reading material.

Good grief -- what is it with this concept that only horrendous events constitute "real" and/or "worthy" reading material? Sick of it. And it's making it harder and harder to find things I want to read.

Was in the mood for a good character-rich mystery -- neither gritty nor silly -- and ended up going back to re-read several from the 1930s.
You might enjoy the Kate Fansler mystery series by Amanda Cross (a nom de plum I think...)
http://www.booksnbytes.com/authors/cross_amanda.html
cheers,
RIP Mr. Bogle.

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VictoriaF
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Alexander McCall Smith

Post by VictoriaF » Thu Sep 18, 2008 5:39 pm

nisiprius wrote:
Actually in the middle of:
The Good Husband of Zebra Drive, by Alexander McCall Smith
I just finished marathon reading of McCall Smith. (Actually, listening to his books on tape.) I started with the The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency series and when it was over, I had withdrawal symptoms and moved to The Sunday Philosophy Club series and the 44 Scotland Street series.

Now, I want to go to Edinburgh ;)

Near term, McCall Smith will be in Washington on 27 September 2008, for the National Book Festival:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/ar ... -festival/

And on 1 April 2009, his The Really Terrible Orchestra will be performing in New York.
http://thereallyterribleorchestra.com/

Victoria

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modal
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Post by modal » Thu Sep 18, 2008 5:56 pm

johnoutk wrote:...rereading 'Watchmen' by Alan Moore
I just got that last week. We'll see how it goes.

Tony
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Post by Tony » Thu Sep 18, 2008 6:32 pm

The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse by Louise Erdrich. The setting is the Ojibwa reservation during the last century.
Tony

Slapshot
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Post by Slapshot » Thu Sep 18, 2008 6:40 pm

Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy from about 20 years ago. Interesting in light of the recent Russian incursion into Georgia.
This time, like all times, is the best of times if we but know what to do with it.

medgar
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Post by medgar » Thu Sep 18, 2008 6:48 pm

Just finished James Lee Burke "Sunset Limited" so so

Reading two very interesting books:

The Drunkard's Walk: A case for how life events are random

'Gettysburg: A testing of courage' If you read only one book on the Gettysburg campaign this one is hard to beat.

Medgar

gkaplan
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Post by gkaplan » Thu Sep 18, 2008 9:50 pm

Early Reagan: the Rise to Power by Anne Edwards
Gordon

chaz
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Post by chaz » Fri Sep 19, 2008 10:10 am

"A Place of Hiding" by Elizabeth George. Another good read from this talented author.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

jegallup
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Post by jegallup » Fri Sep 19, 2008 11:16 am

Index Fan wrote:A Splendid Exchange: How Trade Shaped the World by William J. Bernstein- very good book about the history of trade through the ages.
Just finishing that one up. A bit dry in spots, but an excellent read. Kind of reminds me of Guns, Germs and Steel in the way it creatively draws together information from so many sources.

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MIARay
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Post by MIARay » Fri Sep 19, 2008 11:18 am

"The Complete Works of Lao Tzu- Tao Te Ching & Hua Hu Ching" by Hua-Ching Ni

linenfort
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Post by linenfort » Fri Sep 19, 2008 6:35 pm

Carl Hiassen novels.
National Geo, always.

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lucky7
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Stephen Hawkings

Post by lucky7 » Sat Sep 20, 2008 4:31 pm

A couple by him, I think the last was, stephen hawking's universe. Really changes the way one may perceive things. Also Understanding Einstein for dummies (or idiots, can't recall) great read, interwines his life history.

Bob
Scotty, beam me up.

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nisiprius
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Post by nisiprius » Sat Sep 20, 2008 5:54 pm

The Elephant and the Dragon: The Rise of India and China and What It Means for All of Us: Robyn Meredith. Recent economic/financial/industrial history of India and China. My wife thought it was great, I'm 1/3 of the way through and inclined to agree.

A History of American Higher Education, by John R. Thelin.

This is embarrassing. I started The Story of Edgar Sawtelle, by David Wroblewski, but being in demand the library doesn't allow it to be renewed and I had to return it only 1/4 of the way through it. The first 1/4 of it is very, very good.
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

lippy
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Post by lippy » Sun Sep 21, 2008 7:50 pm

The Smartest 401k Book You'll Ever Read – Daniel Solin
http://www.amazon.com/Smartest-401k-Boo ... 092&sr=8-1

Cat O'Nine Tales: And Other Stories – Jeffrey Archer
http://www.amazon.com/Cat-ONine-Tales-O ... 209&sr=1-2

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runthetrails
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Post by runthetrails » Mon Sep 22, 2008 10:02 am

When Markets Collide: Investment Strategies for the Age of Global
Economic Change
, by Mohamed El-Erian

Stumbling on Happiness, by Daniel Gilbert

The Intelligent Asset Allocator, by William Bernstein

Spend 'Til the End, by Lawrence Kotlikoff and Scott Burns

The Wood Nymph and the Cranky Saint, by C. Dale Brittain

Currently reading Guns, Germs and Steel, by Jared Diamond

Audiobooks:
We're listening to Ian Rankin's John Rebus series in the car

On my personal player I have
The Retrieval Artist series, by Kristine Kathryn Rusch

The first 3 books of the Nightrunner series, by Lynn Flewelling

chaz
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Post by chaz » Mon Sep 22, 2008 10:24 am

chaz wrote:"A Place of Hiding" by Elizabeth George. Another good read from this talented author.
I am still reading this book. It is a long story. Very good.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

Valuethinker
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Re: Alexander McCall Smith

Post by Valuethinker » Mon Sep 22, 2008 12:40 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
nisiprius wrote:
Actually in the middle of:
The Good Husband of Zebra Drive, by Alexander McCall Smith
I just finished marathon reading of McCall Smith. (Actually, listening to his books on tape.) I started with the The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency series and when it was over, I had withdrawal symptoms and moved to The Sunday Philosophy Club series and the 44 Scotland Street series.

Now, I want to go to Edinburgh ;)
Well, think St. Petersburg. But without the mosquitoes ;-).

You have 2 choices: Festival or not Festival (August).

The Festival is an extraordinary experience especially The Fringe (experimental theatre, music and comedy). You can literally see stuff from 9am until 2am. You will become an expert on the labyrinthine streets running from the (medieval) Old Town to the (18th Century) New Town (the Castle, on top of a pretty big hill, is right smack in the way)-- one needs a 3D appreciation of the street grid rather than just a 2D one. You will literally run from event to event.

Accomodation during Festival is not easy but look for Bed and Breakfast accomodation. It is an extraordinary experience (although the Book Festival at Hay on Wye, near Wales, rivals it for the speakers).

Not Festival I would still try to go between early June and late September, because the winter weather is tough (wet and a clinging damp cold) and because the days are *very* short (same latitude as St. Petersburg, I think).

New Years is Hogmanay, a drinking binge so severe that the Scots get January 2nd as a second public holiday to recover. I only recommend it for the hard core (and with friends). They sell tickets to the downtown for Hogmanay, and I was absolutely frightened on Princess Street (the main drag) being shoved around by drunken people.

The Scots drink like the English, but probably (because the bars are open much later) the cumulative effect is less dramatic on the streets (this does still speak to being careful in the Old Town after about 10pm).

Christmas by contrast is quite Presbyterian (read unexpressive and low key) I would rather Christmas in a Catholic country (or Easter in an Orthodox one). With the exception of some residual Catholic-Protestant tension in Glasgow (different football clubs) Scotland is post-religious (except for something called the We Frees, an aescetic Protestant sect in the Highlands-- on some Hebridean Islands, the ferry stops work on a Sunday, which really is cutting yourself off).

What would be good is some kind of architectural tour that takes you into the New Town (a UNESCO World Heritage site) and gets you into some of the buildings (many of which are working offices).

Leith, a former fishing village with quite a seedy history (see the heroin addicts memorably recorded in the excellent film 'Trainspotting') is an interesting place with restaurants and bars.

The Zoo is fantastic ;-).

Edinburgh itself is quite a small town, relatively. You can see most of it in 4 or 5 days (ex the Festival).

The NW part of Scotland is the most strikingly beautiful (anywhere along the West Coast, starting about 50 miles N of Glasgow)-- all the way up to Ullapool. It rains all the time (but it's not always raining, if you see what I mean ;-)) and the midges (small biting insects) are vile, but the scenery is spectacular. You can take a train from Glasgow to Fort William (an ugly town) but generally you need a car to get around (see The Rough Guide for the limited public transport options)-- get a fuel efficient vehicle (standard transmission) as the petrol is 20p more expensive a litre than in the south (so c. £1.20-1.40 at the mo').

Inverness is also a classic entry point to the HIghlands. Again a functional town but in a spectacular area. Most of the east coast towns are quaint but not hugely interesting. Aberdeen itself is a wealthy oil town and I don't find it inspiring, but the fishing village in the harbour area is kind of neat.

Orkney Islands is a completely special place. It's a long coach journey from Edinburgh but you can fly (assuming the fog is OK ;-)). 4000 year old prehistoric monuments and medieval fishing villages, plus the wrecks of the WWI German High Seas Fleet (scuttled to prevent the English using it, after the surrender) at Scapa Flow.

Outer Hebrides are supposed to be fascinating, however the ferries don't run on Sundays (and nothing, but nothing, is open).

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Post by Valuethinker » Mon Sep 22, 2008 12:43 pm

medgar wrote:
'Gettysburg: A testing of courage' If you read only one book on the Gettysburg campaign this one is hard to beat.

Medgar
Killer Angels by Michael Shaara remains my favourite (fiction) of that campaign.

Much to be said for Thomas Keneally's Confederates about the Antietam Campaign (he wrote 'Schindler's List' on which Spielberg based the movie).

Valuethinker
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Post by Valuethinker » Mon Sep 22, 2008 12:46 pm

Slapshot wrote:Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy from about 20 years ago. Interesting in light of the recent Russian incursion into Georgia.
Interesting in light of the Icelandic economy now ;-).

Remember that Russian military power is a shadow of its former self. They retain the ability to invade outnumbered near neighbours, and they are nuclear armed, but not much else.

Angst
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Post by Angst » Mon Sep 22, 2008 1:22 pm

"Bananas - How the United Fruit Company Shaped the World" - by Peter Chapman

"Our Daily Meds - How the Pharmaceutical Companies Transformed Themselves into Slick Marketing Machines and Hooked the Nation on Prescription Drugs" - by Melody Petersen

Ha! I must look like some lefty; au contraire, but both books are fascinating and well-written. The first includes a fair bit of dry, British wit. The second is stunning in terms of the breadth of its scope. Good reads.

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johnoutk
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Post by johnoutk » Tue Sep 23, 2008 7:06 pm

modal wrote:
johnoutk wrote:...rereading 'Watchmen' by Alan Moore
I just got that last week. We'll see how it goes.
Let me know. I enjoyed it even more the second time through. Can't wait for the movie.

'The Tipping Point' by Malcolm Gladwell

communipaw
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Post by communipaw » Tue Sep 23, 2008 7:33 pm

Dry Manhattan - a history of Prohibition.

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