What Book Are YOU Currently Reading? PART II

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
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Kathleen Ryan
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Post by Kathleen Ryan » Wed Jul 09, 2008 4:52 pm

The book I'm currently reading is, "Physics of the Impossible," by Michio Kaku. What fun!
Best wishes, | Kathleen

linenfort
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Post by linenfort » Wed Jul 09, 2008 7:02 pm

Valuethinker wrote:
linenfort wrote:Generation Kill - reporter Evan Wright, embedded with Marines
in Iraq.
<snip>
I'm not sure it is as good as Dispatches...<snip>
I found I couldn't put it down: read it in one sitting.

I gather they are making a movie of it? I doubt it will work-- you can't recreate the atmosphere of the book in the movie.
It's going to be an HBO series, scripted by one of the creators
of 'The Wire'. I think it debuts next week. (I don't have cable, though,
so the book will have to do. ;-) )

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runthetrails
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Post by runthetrails » Thu Jul 10, 2008 9:17 am

I've just started The Future of Life, by E. O. Wilson. I recently learned of Wilson while watching a NOVA episode about him. The full show is available online in 5 parts. He has a knack for evoking wonder from this layman, at least.

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Post by Valuethinker » Thu Jul 10, 2008 9:54 am

runthetrails wrote:I've just started The Future of Life, by E. O. Wilson. I recently learned of Wilson while watching a NOVA episode about him. The full show is available online in 5 parts. He has a knack for evoking wonder from this layman, at least.
A fantastic book, if somewhat depressing.

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Post by Valuethinker » Thu Jul 10, 2008 9:55 am

linenfort wrote:
Valuethinker wrote:
linenfort wrote:Generation Kill - reporter Evan Wright, embedded with Marines
in Iraq.
<snip>
I'm not sure it is as good as Dispatches...<snip>
I found I couldn't put it down: read it in one sitting.

I gather they are making a movie of it? I doubt it will work-- you can't recreate the atmosphere of the book in the movie.
It's going to be an HBO series, scripted by one of the creators
of 'The Wire'. I think it debuts next week. (I don't have cable, though,
so the book will have to do. ;-) )
Netflix is our friend ;-).

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Post by Valuethinker » Thu Jul 10, 2008 9:57 am

linenfort wrote:
Valuethinker wrote:
linenfort wrote:Generation Kill - reporter Evan Wright, embedded with Marines
in Iraq.
<snip>
I'm not sure it is as good as Dispatches...<snip>
I found I couldn't put it down: read it in one sitting.

I gather they are making a movie of it? I doubt it will work-- you can't recreate the atmosphere of the book in the movie.
It's going to be an HBO series, scripted by one of the creators
of 'The Wire'. I think it debuts next week. (I don't have cable, though,
so the book will have to do. ;-) )
Now I remember.

I think the lieutenant in that Marine Recon platoon, (Nathaniel Flick?), also wrote an account of the events and published it.

So you can get the story 2 ways, which is almost unknown in the history of that sort of narrative. There are inconsistencies, apparently.

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Post by Valuethinker » Thu Jul 10, 2008 10:04 am

'The Man in the High Castle' by Philip K Dick.

My first Philip K. Dick novel. The Library of American Literature has just put out 2 books compiling his novels, which I guess means he is officially recognised as 'great'.

It's strange. It is set in San Francisco, a (relatively benevolent) protectorate of the victorious Japanese Empire.

Much of America is under domination of the German Nazi regime. Hitler is in an insane asylum. Martin Borman is Reichschancellor. The Nazis have reduced much of the world to rubble and exterminated their 'racially inferior' populations.

In the unoccupied mountain states, a book has been published, an underground bestseller 'Leaves of a Grasshopper'. It postulates that Roosevelt was not assassinated at the 1936 Democratic Convention, and the US went on to win World War II. London was never burned, Churchill was never shot, Nazi space planes never bombarded New York, etc.

The Nazis, needless to say, are not happy about this book which they see as rallying opposition to their rule. A German official journeys by rocket plane (this is 1964) from Berlin to San Francisco to speak to the local Japanese trade representative...

It's kind of a meditation on the conflict between rationalist western cause-effect logic, and Eastern spiritualism (the I Ching has a major role).

On one level, I absolutely could not put it down. Read 220 pages in one sitting.

Having only been exposed to Dick in film (Blade Runner, Minority Report, A Scanner Darkly, Total Recall) it will be interesting to see how much further I pursue Dick, described as the greatest science fiction writer who ever lived.

bolt
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Post by bolt » Tue Jul 15, 2008 12:19 pm

"Economics in 1 lesson" by Hazlitt---its great!~ Good Luck!

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Post by nisiprius » Tue Jul 15, 2008 12:24 pm

Within the last few weeks:

The Gold Coast, by Nelson DeMille

Revolution in the Valley, by Andy Hertzfeld

Actually in the middle of:
The Good Husband of Zebra Drive, by Alexander McCall Smith

Risk, by Dick Francis
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

bolt
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Re: post subject

Post by bolt » Tue Jul 15, 2008 12:32 pm

Jazzman wrote:The Audacity of Hope by Barack Obama.
:D HES HOPES N DREAMS #1 SALESMAN!!!! :D

chaz
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Post by chaz » Wed Jul 16, 2008 10:11 am

"Thriller", a collection of short stories, edited by James Patterson.
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stratton
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Post by stratton » Wed Jul 16, 2008 10:45 am

Spend til The End by Burns and Kotlikoff

if not stocks, what? by Gene Walden. Mutual funds are not stocks in this case. Lots of alternatives including unit investment trusts and limited real estate partnerships. Doesn't really give enoug info to invest despite what the back of the book suggests. It is pretty up front with risks.

Paul

brswif00
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The Exception & the Flashman novels

Post by brswif00 » Wed Jul 16, 2008 12:31 pm

I just finished The Exception by Christian Jungersen. You really never will look at your co-workers the same way after this one. I read the whole thing on a cross-country flight. It was so good I didn't mind having a delay at ORD, that way I was just closing it when the pilot said prepare for landing.

And although I read the last of these a while back, and the great man just died recently, most of the posters here would probably really enjoy the entire Flashman series by George MacDonald Fraser. It is historical fiction at its absolute best, meticulously researched but also really fun to read. Flashman is like a Victorian James Bond, but with a very big twist. Try the first one - you'll be hooked, and you will also learn a whole lot about Afghanistan in the process.

Stephen
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Post by Stephen » Wed Jul 16, 2008 8:45 pm

Short stories by Hawthorne

Short stories by Chekhov

The Life of Timon of Athens ("Long considered to be an incomplete Shakespearean work, Timon of Athens has been shown by modern scholarship to be, in all probability, a collaboration between Shakespeare and Thomas Middleton." Source: The Royal Shakespeare Company's edition of William Shakespeare Complete Works)

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Post by chaz » Thu Jul 17, 2008 3:55 pm

"Simple Genius" by David Baldacci.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

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retiredbuthappy
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Post by retiredbuthappy » Thu Aug 07, 2008 1:22 pm

"Another Day in the Frontal Lobe" by Katrina Firlik
How to be a neurosurgeon....funny and interesting.
Also
"Better" by Atul Gawande
How to make medicine and health better...each chapter is a different approach to improving health and healing.

These two books are as intelligent and thoughtful and interesting as the Bogelhead Forums have been!
RBH

Valuethinker
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Re: The Exception & the Flashman novels

Post by Valuethinker » Thu Aug 07, 2008 1:56 pm

brswif00 wrote:I just finished The Exception by Christian Jungersen. You really never will look at your co-workers the same way after this one. I read the whole thing on a cross-country flight. It was so good I didn't mind having a delay at ORD, that way I was just closing it when the pilot said prepare for landing.

And although I read the last of these a while back, and the great man just died recently, most of the posters here would probably really enjoy the entire Flashman series by George MacDonald Fraser. It is historical fiction at its absolute best, meticulously researched but also really fun to read. Flashman is like a Victorian James Bond, but with a very big twist. Try the first one - you'll be hooked, and you will also learn a whole lot about Afghanistan in the process.
Wildly politically incorrect. From memory, Flashman thinks nothing of the odd rape. Flashman is of course based on the school bully from 'Tom Brown's Schooldays' and is *meant* to be a cad.

Fraser was that genuine British eccentric. In newspaper interviews you got the general impression that he thought allowing women to do things like to go out and work outside the home, and funny coloured foreign people to live in England, was generally a bad thing (I'm not saying he was a racist, so much as generally xenophobic and disliking of change). His book 'Quartered Safe Out Here' about fighting the Japanese in Burma with the Cumbrian Regiment in 1944-45 is also a classic.

Of course Ian Fleming, who wrote James Bond, was a considerable sado-masochist, and that shows in his books.

For British patriots, Patrick O'Brien and CS Forrester must surely take the cake. Lovers of naval novels should also check out Nicholas Monserrat (The Cruel Sea, the Master Mariner).

'Master and Commander: the Far Side of the World' based on O'Brien is one of my favourite adventure movies, although Hollywood compelled a change in villain from American privateer to French ;-).

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Post by chaz » Thu Aug 07, 2008 2:18 pm

"The Hunt Club" by John Lescroart.
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Post by marie17 » Thu Aug 07, 2008 3:39 pm

I am reading the Wind-up Bird Chronicle by Murakami. This is the second book of his that I am reading - the first being Kafka on the Shore. He is a good writer, I find the stories engaging and weird, but the first book didn't leave a lasting impression on me, not sure if this one will either.

Next I plan on diving into some Cormac McCarthy, I have heard good things...

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Post by nisiprius » Thu Aug 07, 2008 5:20 pm

Just finished Marked Man by William Lashner. So-so, but I have to say that pages 1 through 6, down to the line of asterisks, constitute one of the very best openings to a mystery novel I have ever read.

Also just finished Cathedral by Nelson DeMille. I thought his novel, The Gold Coast, was sensational, but I didn't think much of Cathedral.

My wife says The Reasonable Art of Fly Fishing, by Terry Mort, is so good that I absolutely must read it, even though I couldn't care less about fly fishing. She's so insistent that when she finished the library copy she was reading, she bought me a used copy, and I don't think I can stall much longer in reading it.

I've just started The Hammer of Eden, by Ken Follett, which seems to be about some crazed hippies that steal a "seismic vibrator" truck and threaten to cause an earthquake if their demands aren't met. Sounds like great fun.

Oh, and the copy of Spend 'Til the End, by Laurence J. Kotlikoff and Scott Burns, that I requested at the library, has just come in and I'll be reading it soon.
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

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Re: The Exception & the Flashman novels

Post by nisiprius » Thu Aug 07, 2008 5:28 pm

Valuethinker wrote:
brswif00 wrote:...the entire Flashman series by George MacDonald Fraser...
Wildly politically incorrect. From memory, Flashman thinks nothing of the odd rape. Flashman is of course based on the school bully from 'Tom Brown's Schooldays' and is *meant* to be a cad.
I've read a few of them, not recently, but my recollection is that they're not exactly rapes... although I suppose that's what some rapists always think.
Of course Ian Fleming, who wrote James Bond, was a considerable sado-masochist, and that shows in his books.
I reread Casino Royale in preparation for seeing the movie last year. That's probably one of the more overtly SM ones. A friend of mine summarized it by saying "He spends the first half of his book getting his [vernacular for testicles] flayed and the second half wondering whether he can still [vernacular for intercourse], and it turns out that he can." But even stranger, to my mind, is that it is one of several books of his books in which a plot point is premised on the assumption that casino gambling is a game of skill. The passages describing how James Bond beats Le Chiffre are an astonishing view into the gambler's mind.

One of my cherished possessions is a Harvard Lampoon book called Alligator, by "I*n Fl*ming." They get him down to a T. Preparing for a high-stakes game of "Go Fish,"
He had quickly showered and dressed, tossed down seven double martinis, eaten the cheese rarebit that his Welsh treasure had prepared for him, and swallowed fourteen benzedrine tablets he had gotten Lil to wangle out of surgery, reasoning that the overconfidence the drug would produce could be a tremendous asset when the stakes reached a dangerously high level.
He chose a blue Mobylette, for, though slower than many others on the stretch, its power on the hilly Bermuda roadways would more than make up for that.
"A bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwich," he said. "The bacon must be crisp, not however, overcooked. Lettuce from the inside, please, but not from the heart. The small, pale leaves just under the outer covering are best. Do not peel the tomato but wash it thoroughly in very hot water, then chill it for at least seven minutes in a bowl of ice. Toast the bread lightly on one side. Hellman's mayonnaise--a medium portion--on both pieces. And a bottle of Schlitz.
I actually read Tom Brown's School-Days, by the way, a long time ago. I don't think I could do it again.
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

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Post by hudson4351 » Thu Aug 07, 2008 9:19 pm

Kathleen Ryan wrote:The book I'm currently reading is, "Physics of the Impossible," by Michio Kaku. What fun!
I just started his Parallel Worlds book. I read Hyperspace several years ago and liked it, so hopefully this one will be good too.

Valuethinker
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Post by Valuethinker » Fri Aug 08, 2008 11:40 am

marie17 wrote:I am reading the Wind-up Bird Chronicle by Murakami. This is the second book of his that I am reading - the first being Kafka on the Shore. He is a good writer, I find the stories engaging and weird, but the first book didn't leave a lasting impression on me, not sure if this one will either.

Next I plan on diving into some Cormac McCarthy, I have heard good things...
Murakami is surely one of the world's great writers.

His 'Tokyo Underground' about the nerve gas attacks in the Tokyo subway, and the aftermath, is an amazing study of a terrorist attack and its effects on Japanese society.

Cormac McCarthy defines brutality: at least The Road does. Excellent writing, you might call it the best apocalypse novel ever written (I'm a big fan of Canticle for Leibowitz, but it's no stylistic triump).

Heard No Country for Old Men also very good.

chaz
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Post by chaz » Sat Aug 09, 2008 10:56 am

As I finish "The Hunt Club" by John Lescroart, I will next read "The Motive" by John Lescroart. He is a fine writer in the mystery genre.
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Post by gkaplan » Sun Aug 10, 2008 6:40 pm

Well-Schooled in Murder by Elizabeth George.
Gordon

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nisiprius
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Post by nisiprius » Sun Aug 10, 2008 7:26 pm

gkaplan wrote:Well-Schooled in Murder by Elizabeth George.
Now that the Harry Potter series is finished, Elizabeth George is the only writer that my wife and I buy in hardcover, because we can't bear to wait to get it in paperback, or even the few weeks it takes to get a hot new book from the library. Even with George, however, the older books are the best, and that one is terrific.
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

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Summer Reading

Post by bearwolf » Sun Aug 10, 2008 10:57 pm

I have started reading some of Jasper Fforde's books. There is a series of stories that revolve around a character called Thursday Next. She is a literary detective of sorts. I just finished "The Eyre Affair" and have checked out of the library "Something Rotten" and "First Among Sequels". I've read all of Terry Pratchetts books several times and am looking for similar works if anyone has a suggestion. We really love British humour and would enjoy anything along those lines.

BearWolf

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Post by mminaz » Mon Aug 11, 2008 1:11 am

Previous: Cesar's way : the natural, everyday guide to understanding and correcting common dog problems by Cesar Millan

Current: The Black Swan by Nassim Taleb

Next: The 7 habits of highly effective people by Stephen R Covey


Here is my bookshelf of read and to-be-read books:
http://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/sha ... p?id=16394

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Post by chaz » Mon Aug 11, 2008 9:50 am

I see thst gkaplan is reading a book by Elizabeth George. I recebtly read one of her novels, "What Happened Before He Shot Her". It is a powerful story of young people trying to grow up in a poor section of London, but getting into trouble that escalates. Engrossing!! Some of her novels have become plays on PBS. Much talent.
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Re: Summer Reading

Post by runthetrails » Mon Aug 11, 2008 10:31 pm

bearwolf wrote: I've read all of Terry Pratchetts books several times and am looking for similar works if anyone has a suggestion. We really love British humour and would enjoy anything along those lines.

BearWolf

Well, you might try Tom Holtor Robert Rankin. Neither is quite up to Terry Pratchett standards by my reckoning, but give them a try if you haven't.

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Post by runthetrails » Tue Aug 12, 2008 10:20 am

On audio, I'm finishing up the fourth of Stephen R. Donaldson's five-part Gap series.

On my other mp3 player I've started Tim Harford's The Undercover Economist. However, this was during a 50K race with over 100-degree temperatures, so I really need to start over and pay better attention.


Actual paper books:

Work Less, Live More by Bob Clyatt. Fairly Bogleheadesque advice, overall, with a touch of Your Money or Your Life thrown in. I read this for inspiration, as I'm not able to consider retirement or scaling back yet.

He has several suggested portfolios depending on one's desire for simplicity or complexity:
1) The Soda Cracker - a single balanced fund... one of the following:
Vanguard Lifestrategy Moderate (VSMGX) or Conservative Growth (VSCGX)
DFA Global 60/40 Portfolio (DGSIX)
Vanguard Wellington (VWEHX)

2) The Sandwich -
20% S&P 500 (VFINX) or Value Index (VIVAX) or Windsor II (VWNFX)
8% Tax-managed Small (VTMSX)
6% Total Intl Index (VGTSX)
10% Intl Explorer (VINEX)
6% Emerging Mkts (VEIEX)
30% Intermediate Bond (VBIIX)
11% American Century Foreign Bond (BEGBX)
5% REIT Index (VGSIX)
4% Prime Money Market (VMMXX)

3) The Cornucopia (aka the Rational Investing Portfolio) -
12% US Large - Value tilt
8.5% US Small - Value tilt
5% Intl Large
10% Intl Small
6.5% Emerging Market
4% ST corporate bonds/money market
4% US Govt bonds - long-term
10% US Govt bonds - medium-term
12% Intl bonds - medium-term
5% GNMA bonds
4% high-yield bonds
3% oil and gas
2% market neutral hedge fund
4% commodities
5% commercial real estate
5% venture capital/private equity

Clyatt also has an interesting twist on the Safe Withdrawal Method. Each year, calculate 4% of portfolio value for withdrawal. In bad years, revert to the 95% Rule, which states that you can withdraw at least 95% of the amount you took the previous year, even if it exceeds 4% of portfolio value. Success is defined as having the portfolio keep up with inflation over time. Clyatt claims that this method should keep the principal intact indefinitely.


Who's Your City, by Richard Florida. Like Places Rated with a slightly more academic bent.


Reread Designing Great Beers, by Ray Daniels, in preparation for a Honey Rye beer that's fermenting now. Not a good first brewing book, as it's not a how-to, but does a great job of defining the characteristics of various styles from a recipe formulation standpoint. The classic first brewing book, if anyone is interested, is The Complete Joy of Homebrewing, by Charlie Papazian.


Finally, for work: CSS Mastery by Andy Budd, et al. The state of cross-browser css positioning still sucks.

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Re: Summer Reading

Post by Valuethinker » Tue Aug 12, 2008 11:59 am

bearwolf wrote:I have started reading some of Jasper Fforde's books. There is a series of stories that revolve around a character called Thursday Next. She is a literary detective of sorts. I just finished "The Eyre Affair" and have checked out of the library "Something Rotten" and "First Among Sequels". I've read all of Terry Pratchetts books several times and am looking for similar works if anyone has a suggestion. We really love British humour and would enjoy anything along those lines.

BearWolf
Robert Sheckley perhaps, the guy Douglas Adams said of 'he inspired me. But he's actually funny'.

The Robert Aspirin 'Myth Adventures' series has its fans (I am not among them).

Pratchett has a rare form of rapidly advancing Alzheimer's. His announcement of this was very moving.

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Post by medgar » Tue Aug 12, 2008 12:20 pm

Just finished "Killing Floor" Lee Child first book of Jack Reacher series. Good escape reading.

Started "The Monkey's Raincoat" Robert Crais. More mystery than thriller. 1st book of Elvis Cole series.

Anybody have recommendation for good and deep legal thrillers. John Grishman, James Patterson just doesn't do it.

Medgar

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Post by Valuethinker » Tue Aug 12, 2008 1:24 pm

medgar wrote:Just finished "Killing Floor" Lee Child first book of Jack Reacher series. Good escape reading.

Started "The Monkey's Raincoat" Robert Crais. More mystery than thriller. 1st book of Elvis Cole series.

Anybody have recommendation for good and deep legal thrillers. John Grishman, James Patterson just doesn't do it.

Medgar
Scott Turow (Thurow?). He was a criminal attorney in Chicago, and a professor of literature and it shows. 'Presumed Innocent' etc.

George V. Higgins was a DA and a defence attorney in Boston, and again it shows. The dialogue in 'Friends of Eddie Coyle' (again, not a legal thriller per se) is without par.

They are not legal thrillers, but amongst spy thrillers, Charles McCarry 'Tears of Autumn' and of course John Le Carre (any of the Smiley series which were memorably serialized with Sir Alec Guinness in the title role) and Don Delilo 'Libra'.

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Post by Valuethinker » Tue Aug 12, 2008 1:25 pm

mminaz wrote:Previous: Cesar's way : the natural, everyday guide to understanding and correcting common dog problems by Cesar Millan

Current: The Black Swan by Nassim Taleb

Next: The 7 habits of highly effective people by Stephen R Covey


Here is my bookshelf of read and to-be-read books:
http://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/sha ... p?id=16394
The earlier Taleb is better (name escapes me).

Covey's book is irritatingly written, but a truly excellent book with a lot of insight.

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Post by brswif00 » Tue Aug 12, 2008 3:15 pm

The earlier Taleb is better (name escapes me).
Fooled by Randomness, and I also liked it better than Black Swan.
Murakami ... is a good writer, I find the stories engaging and weird, but the first book didn't leave a lasting impression on me, not sure if this one will either.
I liked the more intimate ones better- Sputnik Sweetheart and South of the Border, West of the Sun. He does repeat his themes often, and it sometimes seems the supernatural elements are used to vary things. Before you give up on him you should read the short story 'Tony Takitani' (and see the beautiful film adaptation available from netflix).

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Post by foodnerd » Wed Aug 13, 2008 11:40 am

Just finished "The Wine Bible" by Karen MacNeil. Highly recommend it to any wine lover.

FN

Rodc
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Post by Rodc » Wed Aug 13, 2008 12:32 pm

1776 by David McCullough

Very interesting. I may just have to stop by the library and get a full history of the Revolutionary War.
We live a world with knowledge of the future markets has less than one significant figure. And people will still and always demand answers to three significant digits.

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Post by brswif00 » Wed Aug 13, 2008 1:49 pm

I may just have to stop by the library and get a full history of the Revolutionary War.
You might enjoy comparing your general history of the Revolution with the history in Lies My Teacher Told Me. I was a history major in college, so I had learned many lies. Interesting if you like to compare histories with an eye to who wrote them.

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Post by nisiprius » Wed Aug 13, 2008 1:57 pm

Rodc wrote:1776 by David McCullough

Very interesting.
Yes, my wife and I were both fascinated by it. I'm hoping he goes on to write 1777, 1778, etc. My wife read his book on John Adams, but I bogged down in it.
I may just have to stop by the library and get a full history of the Revolutionary War.
I've thought about that, too. If you find any that are halfway as good as 1776, please post about them.
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

Valuethinker
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Post by Valuethinker » Wed Aug 13, 2008 3:36 pm

nisiprius wrote:
Rodc wrote:1776 by David McCullough

Very interesting.
Yes, my wife and I were both fascinated by it. I'm hoping he goes on to write 1777, 1778, etc. My wife read his book on John Adams, but I bogged down in it.
I may just have to stop by the library and get a full history of the Revolutionary War.
I've thought about that, too. If you find any that are halfway as good as 1776, please post about them.
I like the Jeff Shaara American Revolution books (Rise to Rebellion etc.).

His father wrote 'The Killer Angels' about the Gettysburg Campaign, and the son (I get Michael and Jeff confused) went on to write the prequel (Of Gods and Generals) and the sequel (The Last Full Measure).

They are multi-partite, told from the point of view of the main characters (Franklin, Adams etc.) and are therefore somewhat confusing. But the sweep is good.

The best is the one about the 1845 Mexican war ('Gone for Soldiers') as the characters include a young Lieutenant Ulysses Samuel Grant and a young captain named Robert E. Lee, all of whom distinguished themselves in the campaign at Veracruz.

chaz
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Post by chaz » Wed Aug 13, 2008 3:50 pm

"A Suitable Vengeance" by Elizabeth George.

medgar, you ought to try a book by E George.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

gkaplan
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Post by gkaplan » Wed Aug 13, 2008 3:58 pm

If you're interesting in reading a truly wonderful book on a fascinating founding father read Ron Chernow's Alexander Hamilton.
Gordon

Ugert
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Post by Ugert » Wed Aug 13, 2008 4:04 pm

In Defense of Food - Michael Pollan. Highly recommended! Read "The Omnivore's Dilemma" first, if you haven't.

bluto
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Post by bluto » Wed Aug 13, 2008 4:12 pm

"The Mind of the Market" by Michael Shermer. So far, it's a bit more interesting than my other read, HP Financial Calculator User's Guide.

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Jethro2007
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Post by Jethro2007 » Wed Aug 13, 2008 9:42 pm

Hey all,


Gist finished a compilation of Stephen King short stories...

Hey there, malloc, wow; Now, I realize how I got here...Parents had tons of
Ayn Rand...whatta ticking time bomb, ahahahahahahaha...Thanks for yer insight...I agree...
Beware...stuff gets into your pysche...or was it the Rush...Geddy Lee was a big fan of AR...

Sidebar: I got to see the first season of TV copdrama , Life... I like it...

No zen for Daddy...

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Jethro2007
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Post by Jethro2007 » Wed Aug 13, 2008 10:26 pm

Hey all,

I previously read a book about a marine sniper in Iraq, i dont think it was Jarhead, and another about a guy in an armoured vehicle group, My War?? not sure, and a third about an Iraqi womans life cant remember title but, it was a compilation of her blogs that only went to 2003...Lots of insight into the Iraq war, that didnt make it onto prime time TV...None of them journalists...

My War(??) came close to some Dispatches feel, but Dispatches, I remember fondly and feel that Full Metal Jacket didnt remotely represent the text, but that topic was so huge, how could you compress it all into one small movie...

Thanks for the new Iraq war reference, I'll have to check it out...I turned someone onto "With the Old Breed"(WW2), and got turned onto "The Coldest Winter" (Korea)...very enlightening...

funnymoney
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Gotcha Capitalism

Post by funnymoney » Thu Aug 14, 2008 12:29 am

Currently reading Bob Sullivan's Gotcha Capitalism, which unfortunately will increase any cynicism you might have re: big business victimizing us little guys. Moving credit card payment dates, increasing the # of overdraft charges, inflated title insurance costs, health club membership extra costs, hidden costs in satellite TV contracts, and more.

Sullivan also authors MSNBC.com's Red Tape Chronicles.

Funnymoney

Valuethinker
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Post by Valuethinker » Thu Aug 14, 2008 3:25 am

Jethro2007 wrote:Hey all,

I previously read a book about a marine sniper in Iraq, i dont think it was Jarhead, and another about a guy in an armoured vehicle group, My War?? not sure, and a third about an Iraqi womans life cant remember title but, it was a compilation of her blogs that only went to 2003...Lots of insight into the Iraq war, that didnt make it onto prime time TV...None of them journalists...

My War(??) came close to some Dispatches feel, but Dispatches, I remember fondly and feel that Full Metal Jacket didnt remotely represent the text, but that topic was so huge, how could you compress it all into one small movie...

Thanks for the new Iraq war reference, I'll have to check it out...I turned someone onto "With the Old Breed"(WW2), and got turned onto "The Coldest Winter" (Korea)...very enlightening...
Probably

'Jarhead' about the FIRST Iraq war ie Desert Storm (1990)

The blog book author is 'Riverbend'. Her family has now fled abroad. She was a teenager during the American invasion.

Guy in the armoured vehicle group was probably 'Generation Kill' by Evan Wright, soon to be an HBO series.

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Jethro2007
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Post by Jethro2007 » Thu Aug 14, 2008 9:08 am

Hey all,

Sorry bout that...been a while, but it was Colby Buzzell, My War, and again
this guy isnt a journalist, so not the slickness of a Dispatches...he started by blogging about his duties...maybe it helped him survive...
Maybe it inspired/provoked Generation Kill...(Every war should have its own "Dispatches"...)

Thanks for the Riverbend help, almost 3 years ago, now...that was her blog name, I believe...

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