Do you pay for exercise?

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rixer
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by rixer » Mon Jan 25, 2016 10:48 am

We belong to Crunch Gym. It's $9.95 mth.
I don't have room in the house for gym equipment. I used to walk in the neighborhood but sometimes it's just too cold or raining to be outside. The gym is right down the street and I can go enjoy all the different exercise equipment. I don't have to worry about replacing them and the gym usually buys better equipment than I would spring for.
So for me, it's worth joining the gym.

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Clever_Username
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by Clever_Username » Mon Jan 25, 2016 10:56 am

I live in a small condo, so home exercise is largely out of the question.

I pay $20/month for a chain gym. They have locations in most places ... pretty much all except right near my parents (so I have to figure something else out when I visit them). I enjoy weight training exercises, and that's a large fraction of what I do there. I don't use the treadmills except in terrible weather -- but I do take walks. So I guess I do free exercise separate from the gym anyway.

When I upgrade to a house, one of the things I'm looking for is an area where I can put a cage. I can do most of the non-walking exercises I want in that, assuming the ground supports it fine (so, probably the garage -- good thing I only own one car). Also, it just being there and not occupied by someone else at the time will make it easier for me -- I avoid the gym at peak hours reasoning that the benches or cages will likely be occupied.
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chuckb84
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by chuckb84 » Mon Jan 25, 2016 11:01 am

We pay, but it's $300/year for both of us, on a senior couple rate. That gets us unlimited use of the two public gyms, which have pools, ice skating, indoor running track, all kinds of weight machines, and free weights. Classes, like spinning, yoga, etc, are extra, but cheap. $25/month for two people is an incredible deal. We mostly just use it for the weights.

I spend much more than that on cycling. I have two bikes, all the gear, but the ongoing expense is traveling to do rides. Great exercise though, and keeps me very interested.

ShenziNation

Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by ShenziNation » Mon Jan 25, 2016 11:06 am

llama wrote:We pay. Using the day care at the gym is the only way we can get kid-free time to exercise, and Kid loves it there (they have bouncy houses and other fun stuff there).
+1. YMCA. $66/month for a family of 2A+2c. That includes the kids in their Kid Zone (2 hours per day doing creative things or playing). So much variety, wife gets her yoga fix, indoor cycling, weights, cardio, TRX equipment, climbing wall, tons of group classes, heated pool, BB & racquetball courts, then the youth center which has a splash park, sand volleyball, vertical outdoor climbing thingy, kids group sports, gymnastics, I could go on.
I can go to any Tampa YMCA location. Near work, home, parents, etc.

goodlifer
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by goodlifer » Mon Jan 25, 2016 11:08 am

We tried the Y and our community exercise room. Both were run by cliques that we had no interest in joining, so we stay home. We have a nice treadmill and elliptical that we spent a chunk of change on, and some used weights and kettle bells. I'm looking into a cheaper exercise bike because I don't need the bells and whistles. I much prefer the convenience of a home gym. I like showering directly afterward, and I'm just not going to shower in a public setting. The showers at the Y were gross. I like to get a quick 5 minutes in here and there while taking a break from cleaning. I trained my dog to use the treadmill. Try doing that at a public gym! And finally, I don't have to get dolled up just to exercise. A lot of women go with full make up and their hair done. I can't stand the thought of sweating with make up on, and I don't have a desire to own cute Lululemon outfits. I usually look like a sweaty, hobo piglet when I exercise.

davebo
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by davebo » Mon Jan 25, 2016 11:09 am

My wife belongs to a Lifetime fitness and the club closest to us is considered to be the highest level (so most expensive) because they limit the memberships. The facilities are nice, but it's $80/month just for my wife.

For the last couple years, I've had a gym membership at a park district right next to my work. It works out ok and it's only around $25/month, but I really don't find myself going very often. As I'm writing this, I"m realizing that it is by far the best option for me and I really SHOULD be going.

I'd love to workout at home, but I am not a morning person and that's the only time I can really see myself working out....otherwise it would be after 9pm.

stoptothink
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by stoptothink » Mon Jan 25, 2016 11:20 am

Well...I have. I am fortunate that my employer has one of the nicest corporate gyms I have ever seen and we have a pretty nice community gym that is free, but it is something I take pretty seriously and for liability reasons you aren't going to find bumper plates or any of the strongman toys I like to play with at any corporate or community gym. Our garage is pretty much a gym, with a little carved out space for our subcompact car; full rack, over 600lbs. of bumper plates, plyo box, 400lbs. tire, farmer's walk handles, sled...Inside the house is my wife's spin bike and we also have road (cyclocross) bikes that we ride a lot when it isn't snowing. We've spent well over $5k on various exercise implements over the last several years, it is our one vice.

When it is snowing, as it is now and seemingly half the year, I work out at least 2 days a week at work. Our garage is well-insulated, but not enough room to play with the strongman toys. My wife exercises most morning at the community gym, then spins in our bedroom 2-3x/week.

For us, it is all about time savings and convenience. Even though we have a large commercial gym two miles up the road, the process of getting there, finding a parking spot, possibly waiting to use equipment, etc. takes up a lot of time. Being able to do it in our home, at work whenever I get some free time, or in the community center which is a 30sec walk from our front door is invaluable with two small children.

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Toons
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by Toons » Mon Jan 25, 2016 11:23 am

No.
I have an exercise bike,treadmill downstairs.
A Set of weights out in the shed.
:happy
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daveatca
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Re: nope

Post by daveatca » Mon Jan 25, 2016 11:36 am

Jazztonight wrote:
daveatca wrote:Medicare Advantage thru Kaiser for me.
24 Hour Fitness is free.
This is a great plan, but I do believe it's an optional one that does cost more than the regular plan. That's what I seem to recall when I applied for Kaiser Medicare. No?
Did not cost more.
I have the cheapest Advantage plan with KP. No extra cost.

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TNL
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by TNL » Mon Jan 25, 2016 11:41 am

Andyrunner wrote:I actually pay quite a bit.

We pay a 175 gym membership, but this place has two indoor pools (family and lap swim), an outdoor swim park, basketball courts, racquetball courts, huge gym and large play area for kids between 1-12 years old. We mainly use this place to entertain our daughter and get her in the pool all year.

On top of that, I own running snowshoes, several bikes, indoor bike trainer, treadmill, etc. I thought about buying XC skies this winter but decided I don't have time.

It all depends on how big into your hobbies you are.
We pay 130 a month for this type of gym. The monthly fee includes 2 hours of child care per day while using the gym for both kids. It is money well spent. I usually go 2 days a week. My spouse goes almost daily. For our family, a fitness culture is part of what's important to us. We spend more on our gym membership than on eating out. Our gym (which is more like a country club really, minus the golf course) organizes events for its members, triathlon training classes, etc. Our family uses the outdoor pool from May until September several times a week. The kids love the kids club and it is helping them understand the value of fitness at a young age.

2Birds1Stone
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by 2Birds1Stone » Mon Jan 25, 2016 11:48 am

We have a VERY nice gym at work with just about everything a commercial gym has except for a pool.

I do pay for a US Masters Swimming Class weekly during the cold weather months. In the warmer months I swim in the Long Island Sound.

Rodc
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by Rodc » Mon Jan 25, 2016 12:10 pm

Nice full service (other than pool) gym at work, $10/month. Used about 4 days a week. Very convenient.

Also membership in a "rock" climbing gym, not so cheap, forget the exact cost. Climb at least once, generally twice a week.

No membership, but about once a week yoga, cost is drop in rate, I think a 10-pack of classes is $140. This is likely very good for me as an older gentleman in need of flexibility and balance, and more importantly perhaps, something I can do with my wife.

That adds up to a fair amount of money.

Small number of dumbbells and such and a hangboard at home (various hand and finger holds for pull-ups and hang points).

Gym is extremely hard short intervals on a rowing machine 2-3 times a week, hard 30 minute stairmaster sessions 2-3 times a week. Try to run outdoors twice a week. "Hard" lifting once a week and light lifting/body weight for endurance 3-4 times a week. Yoga once a week.

And when the weather is nice, I like to go on the occasional bike rides, outdoor climbing, ice climbing in the winter (using a definition of nice weather that would stretch the boundaries for many people), hikes, etc.
We live a world with knowledge of the future markets has less than one significant figure. And people will still and always demand answers to three significant digits.

SamB
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by SamB » Mon Jan 25, 2016 12:47 pm

I exercise every day, but not because I think it has anything to do with my BMI, or health for that matter. I like being outside, and I am a life long biker. So, every day I either walk, or bike, just because I enjoy it.

The thought of going to a gym, and working some type of exercise machine, would be something akin to torture. I honestly do not understand why people do it. If you are into weight lifting, boxing, gymnastics, or some other sport that you enjoy, it would make sense to me, but otherwise, I would either find something that I enjoy or just not do it.

Growing up in the 50's and 60's I do not remember any fitness/gyms for the purpose of helping people stay fit for whatever reason. Exercise was always associated with some sport. In fact, if you saw somebody jogging down the street your reaction was that they were probably running from something.

The exercise industry goes along with the diet industry, the sports food industry, the hydration industry, and probably the sports supplement industry, and even the sports related drug industry, and medical biomarker tracking paraphernalia. Are you really healthier because of all of this? My opinion is that you are not.

Don't pay to join a gym unless you really enjoy it - physically, socially, whatever. If you don't like any sports, maybe you would be better off meditating for 15 minutes per day.

Drew777
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by Drew777 » Mon Jan 25, 2016 1:50 pm

I compete in bodybuilding, so yes, I have a gym membership. It would be more expensive for me to build a home gym the way I would want it than a lifetime of gym membership fees would cost me.

dubsem
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by dubsem » Mon Jan 25, 2016 1:54 pm

I use a combination of running outside, jumproping in the garage, dumbbells from craigslist, and exercises using body weight.
G.O.O.D.

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Crimsontide
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by Crimsontide » Mon Jan 25, 2016 2:04 pm

saltycaper wrote:No. Walking is free. You can walk slowly or quickly. For a more vigorous workout, walk up a hill. Treadmills are dreadfully boring without a workout partner, and the air is stale. Outside, the air smells fresher (except at rush hour on a humid summer day). The scenery is stimulating too. I can walk outside and think, maybe listen to music as well. I don't think I've ever gotten any serious thinking done on a treadmill. Treadmills can be good for a seriously intense workout though, especially if you're in the middle of a thought and someone decides to crank up the TV because SportsCenter is JUST NOT LOUD ENOUGH.
+1 Walking and hiking are free. If its rainy or snowy or just too cold we walk in the mall before the crowds arrive.

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simplesimon
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by simplesimon » Mon Jan 25, 2016 2:14 pm

I pay $80/month for a gym across the street from work in downtown. The locker rooms and showers are clean and I go 3x/week during lunch.

My philosophy is the gym needs to be either close to work or close to home for me to be able to stay disciplined enough to go. I rent an apartment with no room for a home gym and the closest gym is a bit a ways away.

I lift weights.

Colorado13
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by Colorado13 » Mon Jan 25, 2016 2:19 pm

I hike and bike outdoors regularly, but my gym is 3 blocks from my house, so it's very convenient. I pay about $35 a month and enjoy it February-December; January is crowded with all of the newbies. I've been a gym member since my teens and hope to continue into my 80s...or beyond. It's money well spent.

surfstar
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by surfstar » Mon Jan 25, 2016 2:32 pm

My idea for years has been a gym that captures all of the wasted energy and actually turns it into energy.

Just think, all those bikes and weight machines that are 0% efficient. Each member would have a swipe card, so you could track how much energy you generated in the past ___ time frame. It would be environmentally friendly and the energy generation could offset some membership fees.

I only ask 5% of net, if you use my idea.

:D


We joined a "gym" on 1/1 - because they had a 1/2 off sale, for yearly pre-paid memberships. So it comes out to $21.x each/month, for the local climbing gym. Sad to become a gym rat, after trying to only climb outside. It is motivational at least, and should help our outdoor climbing.

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Boomer01
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by Boomer01 » Mon Jan 25, 2016 2:41 pm

I have done both. I've been a member of a gym for many years and went consistently. I began collecting benches, weights, dumbbells and made the switch to a home gym in my garage. I used it 3/4 days a week, but the summers and winters made it brutal. Then we had a kid and between getting to work early and spending family time after work, I never made time for working out. I joined a co-worker who was going to a $10/month Gold's Gym Express near our work at lunch and have been doing that for 3-4 years now religiously with great results. Once at the gym I am more likely to work harder and have less distractions than working out at home. Working out at lunch breaks up my day and prevents me from eating horribly at lunch. It's a win-win.

fposte
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by fposte » Mon Jan 25, 2016 2:49 pm

I only exercise at home, but it's still not free--I use my elliptical, my yoga DVDs, my weights, etc. as well as going for walks. I've definitely amortized the expense down to very little, though.

I would love to have a pool, but that would be paying for exercise big time, more than is in my budget.

Rodc
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by Rodc » Mon Jan 25, 2016 2:58 pm

Crimsontide wrote:
saltycaper wrote:No. Walking is free. You can walk slowly or quickly. For a more vigorous workout, walk up a hill. Treadmills are dreadfully boring without a workout partner, and the air is stale. Outside, the air smells fresher (except at rush hour on a humid summer day). The scenery is stimulating too. I can walk outside and think, maybe listen to music as well. I don't think I've ever gotten any serious thinking done on a treadmill. Treadmills can be good for a seriously intense workout though, especially if you're in the middle of a thought and someone decides to crank up the TV because SportsCenter is JUST NOT LOUD ENOUGH.
+1 Walking and hiking are free. If its rainy or snowy or just too cold we walk in the mall before the crowds arrive.
One can always run in the rain, modern gear is good. Same with snow and snowshoes or micro-spikes.

As I got older I found walking/running was insufficient for maintaining strength (never my strong point I might add. :) )

It does not take a full service gym for basic strength maintenance though. Body-weight exercises, perhaps helped with a few dumbbells or bags of gravel, etc. will do the trick if one is not targeting a very high level of strength or very sport specific strength training.

I am a big fan of walking, running, biking, but I confess it is harder than it used to be to fit it into my day, and for some reason I am less tolerant to lousy weather than I used to be. So being able to use the gym at work early in the morning, then take a quick shower and pop into my office before my calendar fills up works better for me. Another thing that will be nice about retirement is time again to spend time outdoors in the sunlight.
We live a world with knowledge of the future markets has less than one significant figure. And people will still and always demand answers to three significant digits.

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artthomp
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by artthomp » Mon Jan 25, 2016 3:02 pm

We used to pay $220/year for a VIP membership for my wife and I at our city gym. We found out in the last couple of years that our Medigap provider, Humana, participates in a health program known as "Silver Sneakers" which now covers our membership for free (to us).
Art

remomnyc
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by remomnyc » Mon Jan 25, 2016 3:09 pm

I pay $200/yr for a tennis permit, run outdoors, and walk everywhere (time permitting). I hate exercising indoors, but when I can no longer run and play tennis, I'll join a gym with a swimming pool.

randomguy
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by randomguy » Mon Jan 25, 2016 5:49 pm

Crimsontide wrote:
saltycaper wrote:No. Walking is free. You can walk slowly or quickly. For a more vigorous workout, walk up a hill. Treadmills are dreadfully boring without a workout partner, and the air is stale. Outside, the air smells fresher (except at rush hour on a humid summer day). The scenery is stimulating too. I can walk outside and think, maybe listen to music as well. I don't think I've ever gotten any serious thinking done on a treadmill. Treadmills can be good for a seriously intense workout though, especially if you're in the middle of a thought and someone decides to crank up the TV because SportsCenter is JUST NOT LOUD ENOUGH.
+1 Walking and hiking are free. If its rainy or snowy or just too cold we walk in the mall before the crowds arrive.
No they aren't. You need shoes and clothes to do both:) Seriously you pay for everything in life. The question is how much and if you feel you are getting your moneys worth. I spend ~400 dollars on running shoes last year (every 500 miles or so) and ~350 on a gym membership. Maybe I could do it cheaper by spending 2-3k upfront to get all the gear (squat rack, bench, ~300lbs of weights, plyo boxes, med balls, kettlebells, prowler....) and dedicating a place to store it. Or of course I could do a workout that is less effective (you can get into really good shape with a bunch of bodyweight exercises but it is less effective time wise and now where near as much fun as loading up a squat bar).

Having spent a bunch of time in the gym, I can tell you that most people should pay more to get in shape. Most of them are doing exercises like pushups, planks, pull ups, lat pull downs, rows, and the rest all wrong. They tend to lack stabilaztion and tend to be using the wrong muscles. Not paying to learn how to do stuff right (you can try and learn it by watching youtube vids and the like but most people struggle to get the moments right without someone telling them how they are doing) is penny wise and pound foolish. A couple of lessons early on would have gotten them on the right path and then they can go instructor free.

UncleBen
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by UncleBen » Mon Jan 25, 2016 5:52 pm

I pay for exercise the next morning.

penumbra
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by penumbra » Mon Jan 25, 2016 6:02 pm

^^ . best response yet!!

We belong to a gym, large chain, but one of the nicest I've ever seen. 160,000 square feet, with everything you can think of. My wife likes the glassed in pool, with outdoor views. I use the machines, exercycles, etc. All classes included. Have an old, grandfathered rate of $7 per month. Feel very lucky. We have an exercycle at home which I use nearly every day, but the gym gets me doing other things I wouldn't otherwise use.

stoptothink
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by stoptothink » Mon Jan 25, 2016 6:06 pm

randomguy wrote:
Crimsontide wrote:
saltycaper wrote:No. Walking is free. You can walk slowly or quickly. For a more vigorous workout, walk up a hill. Treadmills are dreadfully boring without a workout partner, and the air is stale. Outside, the air smells fresher (except at rush hour on a humid summer day). The scenery is stimulating too. I can walk outside and think, maybe listen to music as well. I don't think I've ever gotten any serious thinking done on a treadmill. Treadmills can be good for a seriously intense workout though, especially if you're in the middle of a thought and someone decides to crank up the TV because SportsCenter is JUST NOT LOUD ENOUGH.
+1 Walking and hiking are free. If its rainy or snowy or just too cold we walk in the mall before the crowds arrive.
No they aren't. You need shoes and clothes to do both:) Seriously you pay for everything in life. The question is how much and if you feel you are getting your moneys worth. I spend ~400 dollars on running shoes last year (every 500 miles or so) and ~350 on a gym membership. Maybe I could do it cheaper by spending 2-3k upfront to get all the gear (squat rack, bench, ~300lbs of weights, plyo boxes, med balls, kettlebells, prowler....) and dedicating a place to store it. Or of course I could do a workout that is less effective (you can get into really good shape with a bunch of bodyweight exercises but it is less effective time wise and now where near as much fun as loading up a squat bar).

Having spent a bunch of time in the gym, I can tell you that most people should pay more to get in shape. Most of them are doing exercises like pushups, planks, pull ups, lat pull downs, rows, and the rest all wrong. They tend to lack stabilaztion and tend to be using the wrong muscles. Not paying to learn how to do stuff right (you can try and learn it by watching youtube vids and the like but most people struggle to get the moments right without someone telling them how they are doing) is penny wise and pound foolish. A couple of lessons early on would have gotten them on the right path and then they can go instructor free.
I don't know if the answer is to "pay more to get in shape" but the reality is that 95%+ of people don't have the faintest idea as to how to exercise correctly to meet their goals. As an exercise physiologist by trade, #1 is that people simply don't understand the first principle of physiological adaptation; your body changes (progresses) based upon increased demands. Guess what, you do the same thing all the time, without finding a way to increase the intensity or load or volume, you'll never progress. Your body has no reason to change. Sure, walking is great, if your only physical goal is to be a good walker - it certainly is not going to help you maintain your lean muscle tissue or strength as you age, forget about it if you have bigger goals.

You don't have to necessarily pay more, but extend some effort learning if being in good physical shape and having a long healthy life are priorities.

GoldenFinch
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by GoldenFinch » Mon Jan 25, 2016 6:22 pm

We have a family membership for $87 per month for six people. I use it five days a week. The others use it too, but not as much as me. It is well worth the money. We are in the snow belt so unless we want to be frozen, the gym is the best place for everyday winter exercise. Actually, I really like the place and look forward to going.

IthinkICan
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by IthinkICan » Mon Jan 25, 2016 6:23 pm

I always fall off the wagon and find an excuse not to go to the gym. I've found what works for me is having a personal trainer that will come to my house. It sounds extravagant, I know. However, I have a great person that charges $40 for 30 min. Having a a check in once a month or 6 weeks has kept me working out (sometimes more, sometimes less) for about 3 years now.

I have really simple equipment - a couple of dead weight balls, exercise bands, a pull-up bar, and a yoga mat. That seems to do the trick for me.

When work allows I like to take a group class now and then. But they have to be fun and not just about working out - Hula Hooping, Tai Chi, Aerial Silks, Aerial Hoop, Dancing.

Rodc
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by Rodc » Mon Jan 25, 2016 8:05 pm

stoptothink wrote:
randomguy wrote:
Crimsontide wrote:
saltycaper wrote:No. Walking is free. You can walk slowly or quickly. For a more vigorous workout, walk up a hill. Treadmills are dreadfully boring without a workout partner, and the air is stale. Outside, the air smells fresher (except at rush hour on a humid summer day). The scenery is stimulating too. I can walk outside and think, maybe listen to music as well. I don't think I've ever gotten any serious thinking done on a treadmill. Treadmills can be good for a seriously intense workout though, especially if you're in the middle of a thought and someone decides to crank up the TV because SportsCenter is JUST NOT LOUD ENOUGH.
+1 Walking and hiking are free. If its rainy or snowy or just too cold we walk in the mall before the crowds arrive.
No they aren't. You need shoes and clothes to do both:) Seriously you pay for everything in life. The question is how much and if you feel you are getting your moneys worth. I spend ~400 dollars on running shoes last year (every 500 miles or so) and ~350 on a gym membership. Maybe I could do it cheaper by spending 2-3k upfront to get all the gear (squat rack, bench, ~300lbs of weights, plyo boxes, med balls, kettlebells, prowler....) and dedicating a place to store it. Or of course I could do a workout that is less effective (you can get into really good shape with a bunch of bodyweight exercises but it is less effective time wise and now where near as much fun as loading up a squat bar).

Having spent a bunch of time in the gym, I can tell you that most people should pay more to get in shape. Most of them are doing exercises like pushups, planks, pull ups, lat pull downs, rows, and the rest all wrong. They tend to lack stabilaztion and tend to be using the wrong muscles. Not paying to learn how to do stuff right (you can try and learn it by watching youtube vids and the like but most people struggle to get the moments right without someone telling them how they are doing) is penny wise and pound foolish. A couple of lessons early on would have gotten them on the right path and then they can go instructor free.
I don't know if the answer is to "pay more to get in shape" but the reality is that 95%+ of people don't have the faintest idea as to how to exercise correctly to meet their goals. As an exercise physiologist by trade, #1 is that people simply don't understand the first principle of physiological adaptation; your body changes (progresses) based upon increased demands. Guess what, you do the same thing all the time, without finding a way to increase the intensity or load or volume, you'll never progress. Your body has no reason to change. Sure, walking is great, if your only physical goal is to be a good walker - it certainly is not going to help you maintain your lean muscle tissue or strength as you age, forget about it if you have bigger goals.

You don't have to necessarily pay more, but extend some effort learning if being in good physical shape and having a long healthy life are priorities.
I have read some books in the last few years on physiological adaptation, neurological adaptation, periodization training, training for endurance for climbing, static power for climbing , explosive power, and I have joined a climbing team with 3 coaches for a team of maybe 15 regular attendees who seem to have a solid clue. My hope is that I have moved beyond your 95%, but I know I have a lot to learn. But at about 60 years old I can tell you progress is hard to come by!

I'm not sure at this point if maintaining what I have is not a good goal in and of itself!

But when you are 1,000 ft up a shear wall in the Rocky mountains looking out over the range it sure is nice. Or just climbing at the local crag on a nice day enjoying the day.
We live a world with knowledge of the future markets has less than one significant figure. And people will still and always demand answers to three significant digits.

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HomerJ
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by HomerJ » Mon Jan 25, 2016 8:20 pm

KyleAAA wrote:I'm slightly more likely to work out at home but I tend to go much harder when I'm at the gym.
This. I have a half-price family gym membership (work pays for the other half).

We only go once a week, but we work out hard on that day. Much harder than I work out at home the rest of the week.

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wander
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by wander » Mon Jan 25, 2016 8:43 pm

No, I do not pay for exercise. My employer provides free gym membership.

randomguy
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by randomguy » Mon Jan 25, 2016 8:55 pm

stoptothink wrote:
I don't know if the answer is to "pay more to get in shape" but the reality is that 95%+ of people don't have the faintest idea as to how to exercise correctly to meet their goals. As an exercise physiologist by trade, #1 is that people simply don't understand the first principle of physiological adaptation; your body changes (progresses) based upon increased demands. Guess what, you do the same thing all the time, without finding a way to increase the intensity or load or volume, you'll never progress. Your body has no reason to change. Sure, walking is great, if your only physical goal is to be a good walker - it certainly is not going to help you maintain your lean muscle tissue or strength as you age, forget about it if you have bigger goals.

You don't have to necessarily pay more, but extend some effort learning if being in good physical shape and having a long healthy life are priorities.
You can learn that stuff from a book. Figuring out that when you squat your knees are collapsing, rounding your back, and you are way too shallow are much harder to diagnosis. And pretty much every exercise has a few little things to think about. None of this stuff is magic or really hard to learn but you need to be able to figure out what you are doing wrong to make corrections.

mt
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by mt » Mon Jan 25, 2016 9:22 pm

I like exercising outside. But carbon frame full suspension mountain bikes and top of the line skate skis are not free. They are fun though.

stoptothink
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by stoptothink » Mon Jan 25, 2016 9:39 pm

randomguy wrote:
stoptothink wrote:
I don't know if the answer is to "pay more to get in shape" but the reality is that 95%+ of people don't have the faintest idea as to how to exercise correctly to meet their goals. As an exercise physiologist by trade, #1 is that people simply don't understand the first principle of physiological adaptation; your body changes (progresses) based upon increased demands. Guess what, you do the same thing all the time, without finding a way to increase the intensity or load or volume, you'll never progress. Your body has no reason to change. Sure, walking is great, if your only physical goal is to be a good walker - it certainly is not going to help you maintain your lean muscle tissue or strength as you age, forget about it if you have bigger goals.

You don't have to necessarily pay more, but extend some effort learning if being in good physical shape and having a long healthy life are priorities.
You can learn that stuff from a book. Figuring out that when you squat your knees are collapsing, rounding your back, and you are way too shallow are much harder to diagnosis. And pretty much every exercise has a few little things to think about. None of this stuff is magic or really hard to learn but you need to be able to figure out what you are doing wrong to make corrections.
Absolutely, unless you really know what you are doing, noticing movement pattern dysfunction in yourself is not easy. It can definitely pay to hire a professional...just make sure that person is actually a professional (which is a very real concern in the fitness industry, IMO more so than in the financial services industry). More or less I am responding (in agreement with you) to the people who have answered pretty nonchalantly that it costs nothing. It can certainly be cheap in terms of financial resources, but getting into great shape is expensive in one way or another (in time and effort, if not money). We all have specific goals and mine are probably quite different than most on here, but it is literally impossible to reach the type of physical condition I want to be in by simply walking, even if it is a really steep hill.

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dm200
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by dm200 » Mon Jan 25, 2016 9:54 pm

Yes
Have great deal as senior. $90 per yr for wife and I county Rec center
Big choices - indoor track, 3 kinds ellipticalls, stationary bikes, rowing machines, climber, treadmills, etc
Also weight equipment

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tainted-meat
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by tainted-meat » Mon Jan 25, 2016 9:59 pm

No, although I'm not opposed to it. I walk, run and play tennis and also hit the lake in the summer. I prefer outdoor activities though because I feel more adaptable to changing seasons (hot, cold, etc).

letsgobobby
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by letsgobobby » Mon Jan 25, 2016 10:20 pm

We pay $800 per year for 2 adults. I go often, she rarely does.

I'm thinking of joining Snap for another $400 per year for 24 hour access.

Also use my treadmill at home.

It rains a lot where we live. We also ski and snowshoe and hike and walk outdoors, but some days indoors is the way to go.

Our gym has a stair stepper. The $7500 kind like an escalator. Best cardiovascular in the gym. Max heart rate in 30 seconds flat with no pounding. Nothing like it.

Saving$
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by Saving$ » Mon Jan 25, 2016 10:50 pm

WOW! I cannot believe how inexpensive these are. TOTALLY different story where I am.

I have spent considerable time recently looking for gym or boot camp type memberships. The ones nearby with classes range from $135 - $225 month. I could drive a bit further and join the Y for $72/month for one person, but it is far enough that I don't think I would go often enough. There used to have a free community boot camp class, but they stopped that. I'm seriously considering a fitness "Studio" that sells punch cards for classes that average $12/each. If I go twice per week that is under $100/month.

All the national chains are in the suburbs, so no way I'm driving 30+ minutes for that. One national chain has a location nearby, but charges over $100 initiation fee, and $70 some per month with only 1 hour of parking validated, and no classes. I prefer classes to working out on my own.

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StoneBob
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by StoneBob » Mon Jan 25, 2016 11:34 pm

I have an elliptical machine at home and use it pretty much every day. This, along with diet, helps me keep my blood glucose level under control without medication. To combat boredom while I am working out, I browse the Bogleheads forum on my iPad, making the activity good for both my physical and financial health.

I don't think I could make myself go to a gym on anything like a regular schedule.

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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by investor4life » Mon Jan 25, 2016 11:38 pm

I pay zero per month. The actual cost of $36 per month but my health plan reimburses me $40 each month that DW and I exercise a certain number of times ($20 per person). I tried to get the health club to return the $4 difference to me but no dice :twisted:

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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by 22twain » Mon Jan 25, 2016 11:46 pm

I've always lived in places where work, routine shopping, banking, barber shop etc. were within walking or bicycling distance, and I've gotten my exercise that way. Today was typical: a mile each way to and from work, on foot, plus a mile and a half for lunch and some quick shopping. About half the time, I walk home for lunch.
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willardx
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by willardx » Tue Jan 26, 2016 12:23 am

I don't belong to a gym and primarily ride a road bike for exercise/errands. But I spend a small fortune each year in clothing and maintaining my bikes. I wouldn't trade it for anything. (I also run a little and swim (triathlon), swim mainly in a lake nearby when it's warm enough.)

My wife belongs to a gym and uses it very sporadically. I bought a 2-year membership at Costco for a nearby gym. She prefers taking classes (yoga now) and getting personal training.

So it's all personal, in my opinion. If you already go to the gym regularly, ask yourself why you go. If it's for social aspects, maybe a home gym is not right for you. I can't stand to ride a stationary bike or run on a treadmill, it feels too much like work and I derive no pleasure from it. As long as you set up your fitness routine where you enjoy it, that's the best value.

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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by BW1985 » Tue Jan 26, 2016 9:40 am

I prefer to lift heavy weights for my exercise so yes I pay $50/mo for a Lifetime Fitness membership. Weights are expensive and take up alot of space, otherwise I would consider a home gym. Maybe someday I will.
Last edited by BW1985 on Tue Jan 26, 2016 10:23 am, edited 1 time in total.
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stoptothink
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by stoptothink » Tue Jan 26, 2016 10:21 am

Saving$ wrote:WOW! I cannot believe how inexpensive these are. TOTALLY different story where I am.

I have spent considerable time recently looking for gym or boot camp type memberships. The ones nearby with classes range from $135 - $225 month. I could drive a bit further and join the Y for $72/month for one person, but it is far enough that I don't think I would go often enough. There used to have a free community boot camp class, but they stopped that. I'm seriously considering a fitness "Studio" that sells punch cards for classes that average $12/each. If I go twice per week that is under $100/month.

All the national chains are in the suburbs, so no way I'm driving 30+ minutes for that. One national chain has a location nearby, but charges over $100 initiation fee, and $70 some per month with only 1 hour of parking validated, and no classes. I prefer classes to working out on my own.
I am actually surprised how comparatively expensive gyms are around the country. Planet Fitness opened up around here and forced the one major chain (with like 15 locations in my small county alone, 7 within 10 miles of my home) to lower their prices. $10/month here and some of the locations are pretty impressive in their equipment and class offerings. It's not about financial cost for us, it's about time.

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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by letsgobobby » Tue Jan 26, 2016 11:13 am

I don't understand the PF business model. How are they able to undercut their competitors by 75-80%? They still have the same overhead, and as you say it's not like their places are dumpy. They're pretty nice. I realize all gyms rely on members who don't use the facilities, but what allows PF to do the same at 1/4 the price?

LA Fitness is more convenient to where I am (4 minutes, 5 if I hit the red light) and I like the gym. I wish it were open later on weekends hence the interest in Snap. PF is nearly 10 minutes away so I wouldn't use that as my regular gym.

If I had lots of space I would definitely make my own gym. I don't need the social aspect.

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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by stoptothink » Tue Jan 26, 2016 11:25 am

letsgobobby wrote:I don't understand the PF business model. How are they able to undercut their competitors by 75-80%? They still have the same overhead, and as you say it's not like their places are dumpy. They're pretty nice. I realize all gyms rely on members who don't use the facilities, but what allows PF to do the same at 1/4 the price?
I can't really answer that, I've never been inside one and the entire idea makes little sense to me (they have almost no free weights, lifting heavy weights is prohibited, they have days where there are free donuts or pizza available to patrons). The much larger local chain gym dropped their prices to match immediately after PF came to town, so I don't think they have some secret that allows them to offer cheaper memberships.

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Hayden
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by Hayden » Tue Jan 26, 2016 11:31 am

stoptothink wrote:
randomguy wrote:
Crimsontide wrote:
saltycaper wrote:No. Walking is free. You can walk slowly or quickly. For a more vigorous workout, walk up a hill. Treadmills are dreadfully boring without a workout partner, and the air is stale. Outside, the air smells fresher (except at rush hour on a humid summer day). The scenery is stimulating too. I can walk outside and think, maybe listen to music as well. I don't think I've ever gotten any serious thinking done on a treadmill. Treadmills can be good for a seriously intense workout though, especially if you're in the middle of a thought and someone decides to crank up the TV because SportsCenter is JUST NOT LOUD ENOUGH.
+1 Walking and hiking are free. If its rainy or snowy or just too cold we walk in the mall before the crowds arrive.
No they aren't. You need shoes and clothes to do both:) Seriously you pay for everything in life. The question is how much and if you feel you are getting your moneys worth. I spend ~400 dollars on running shoes last year (every 500 miles or so) and ~350 on a gym membership. Maybe I could do it cheaper by spending 2-3k upfront to get all the gear (squat rack, bench, ~300lbs of weights, plyo boxes, med balls, kettlebells, prowler....) and dedicating a place to store it. Or of course I could do a workout that is less effective (you can get into really good shape with a bunch of bodyweight exercises but it is less effective time wise and now where near as much fun as loading up a squat bar).

Having spent a bunch of time in the gym, I can tell you that most people should pay more to get in shape. Most of them are doing exercises like pushups, planks, pull ups, lat pull downs, rows, and the rest all wrong. They tend to lack stabilaztion and tend to be using the wrong muscles. Not paying to learn how to do stuff right (you can try and learn it by watching youtube vids and the like but most people struggle to get the moments right without someone telling them how they are doing) is penny wise and pound foolish. A couple of lessons early on would have gotten them on the right path and then they can go instructor free.
I don't know if the answer is to "pay more to get in shape" but the reality is that 95%+ of people don't have the faintest idea as to how to exercise correctly to meet their goals. As an exercise physiologist by trade, #1 is that people simply don't understand the first principle of physiological adaptation; your body changes (progresses) based upon increased demands. Guess what, you do the same thing all the time, without finding a way to increase the intensity or load or volume, you'll never progress. Your body has no reason to change. Sure, walking is great, if your only physical goal is to be a good walker - it certainly is not going to help you maintain your lean muscle tissue or strength as you age, forget about it if you have bigger goals.

You don't have to necessarily pay more, but extend some effort learning if being in good physical shape and having a long healthy life are priorities.
After years of struggling (at the gym) I finally figured out that I am using the wrong muscles when I do exercises. But, the trainers at the various gyms over the years were not helpful in diagnosing or correcting the problem. I paid for exercise, but it didn't help.

How does one find a good trainer? What credentials does one look for?

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simplesimon
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Re: Do you pay for exercise?

Post by simplesimon » Tue Jan 26, 2016 11:43 am

stoptothink wrote:
letsgobobby wrote:I don't understand the PF business model. How are they able to undercut their competitors by 75-80%? They still have the same overhead, and as you say it's not like their places are dumpy. They're pretty nice. I realize all gyms rely on members who don't use the facilities, but what allows PF to do the same at 1/4 the price?
I can't really answer that, I've never been inside one and the entire idea makes little sense to me (they have almost no free weights, lifting heavy weights is prohibited, they have days where there are free donuts or pizza available to patrons). The much larger local chain gym dropped their prices to match immediately after PF came to town, so I don't think they have some secret that allows them to offer cheaper memberships.
It's because Planet Fitness has far more members that pay $10/month than people who actually use the gym. If you're an avid gym goer at PF, your fee is being subsidized by the 10 other members that are paying but not using the gym. Its business model hinges on the lack of discipline of the vast majority of members.

NPR's Planet Money did a podcast about this.

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