Beef roast

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Leeraar
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Beef roast

Post by Leeraar » Tue Dec 22, 2015 1:04 am

I have decided to do roast beef for Christmas dinner. I also have bought "The Food Lab" by J. Kenji López-Alt. In short, he recommends cooking the beef in a very low oven (mine will do 175F) for four hours or more, then searing the outside in a very hot oven (mine will do 550F plus a convection fan) for six to eight minutes. Has anyone cooked a beef roast this way?

L.
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jbuzolich
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Re: Beef roast

Post by jbuzolich » Tue Dec 22, 2015 1:22 am

Yes this is the only way I do a rib roast, which we do 2-3 times per year. I learned the method originally watching Alton Brown on Good Eats. I just did one Sunday for a family lunch as a reminder practice in preparation for doing about 15 pounds worth on Christmas day.
I seasoned the roast with lots of kosher salt, fresh cracked black pepper, and chopped garlic then covered and put back in fridge about three hours before cook time. The night before would have been better. Very important next step, I get the roast out of the fridge about 90 minutes before cook time and let it rest covered on the counter so it starts to come to room temperature. You do not want a cold roast going straight into the oven. While the roast is coming to room temperature I preheat oven to 250 and have a pizza stone in there at the bottom for more mass. When ready to cook I drop the oven to 200 and put the roast in there with a probe thermometer. That oven door never opens again until it's done. My 4.4 pound practice roast was done in three hours on the dot and I pulled at 125 degrees F. With the low temperature cooking it only gained 3 more degrees while resting on the counter. We loved it rare to medium rare like that but I will likely go to 130 for Christmas. After pulling the roast at desired temperature it's time to rest again on the counter with a foil tent for 30 min but an hour is better. Heat oven to 500 while it's resting in its tent. When you're ready to eat pop it in that hot oven for 5-10 minutes until you get the amount of crust you like. Pull when crusty and nice then slice and eat.
It really is probably the easiest celebration meat dish I know of.

2comma
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Re: Beef roast

Post by 2comma » Tue Dec 22, 2015 2:09 am

Please be sure to PM instructions on how to get to your house, it sounds delicious!
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JoinToday
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Re: Beef roast

Post by JoinToday » Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:53 am

jbuzolich wrote:Very important next step, I get the roast out of the fridge about 90 minutes before cook time and let it rest covered on the counter so it starts to come to room temperature. You do not want a cold roast going straight into the oven. While the roast is coming to room temperature I preheat oven to 250 and have a pizza stone in there at the bottom for more mass. When ready to cook I drop the oven to 200 and put the roast in there with a probe thermometer. That oven door never opens again until it's done. My 4.4 pound practice roast was done in three hours on the dot and I pulled at 125 degrees F.
A couple years ago I took my roast out of the refrigerator, put a probe in it, and let it sit at room temperature for 2 hours or so. I was stunned at how little the temperature increased. Maybe 1 or 2 degrees. I am not convinced of the benefit of letting it rest. But I am certain it doesn't hurt, so that is what I will do in the future.

Having said that, I used the method described in J. Kenji López-Alt's website, http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/12/step ... e-rib.html sounds like the same as described in the book. It is the ONLY way to do it (if you want to do it right). There may be many roads to Dublin, but there is only one way to cook prime rib. This is it.

1. You have to use a temp probe as jbozolich did, and do NOT open the oven until the roast is done, as stated. I think this is critical.(I did the preheat at 200 F)

2. The other thing that surprised me was how little the temperature increased after removing from the oven. I think I took mine out around 128 F, if I recall correctly. It was Perfect. My knees got weak just looking at the cut slices of prime rib -- absolutely beautiful. I was almost overcome with emotion, my wife had to give me the smelling salt (OK, a little embellishment there). But Lawry's Prime Rib couldn't do it better.

3. Although the website differs from my opinion, I believe is better to get a boneless roast (or cut the rib bones off). I think ribs distort the thermal conduction of the roast, so you are more likely to over cook the top in order for the meat near the bone to be cooked as you want. His website had a test of the taste difference with & without ribs, and with aluminum foil to act as a barrier between the ribs and roast. I recall there wasn't a taste difference, but a texture difference where the bone was. http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/12/food ... .html#bone
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The Wizard
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Re: Beef roast

Post by The Wizard » Tue Dec 22, 2015 5:32 am

I agree also on the slow and low reverse sear method.
But I use a hand held instant read thermometer and open the oven a few times to check.
The prohibition on opening the oven is unnecessary.

I will also check the internal temperature a hour after taking out of fridge next time to see how much it's gotten warmer from the 38 degree starting point. This may be less critical when cooking at less than 200 degrees vs 350...
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jebmke
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Re: Beef roast

Post by jebmke » Tue Dec 22, 2015 8:50 am

I use this method for almost everything except burgers. Low and slow until internal temp hits around 90 then quick sear. Beef comes off when internal is ~125. Pork comes off ~135

I bump things up a bit for poultry but essentially the same process.
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lthenderson
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Re: Beef roast

Post by lthenderson » Tue Dec 22, 2015 9:42 am

I use this method for baby back ribs all the time. Getting a oven thermometer that you can set the alarm for a certain internal temperature is money well spent in my opinion.

jbuzolich
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Re: Beef roast

Post by jbuzolich » Tue Dec 22, 2015 9:47 am

Adding a little financial spice to our roast, I also find rib roasts go a long way with family and guests even though they are not cheap. Beef prices have gone up substantially but it still feels that roasts end up being reasonable especially from a bang for the buck perspective. Most guests are wildly impressed and appreciative. I paid $10.99 pound at Costco for a roast where one end had the best marbling I have ever seen. That essentially worked out to around $5 for a generous slice still considered too large for some, or $10 per slice for the "I'll never eat all that" response. We did have left overs but not a ton.
Another added bonus, left over rare rib roast reheated in a cast iron skillet the next day is rather amazing.

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whatusername?
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Re: Beef roast

Post by whatusername? » Tue Dec 22, 2015 10:09 am

lthenderson wrote:Getting a oven thermometer that you can set the alarm for a certain internal temperature is money well spent in my opinion.
Do you have a favorite you like?

Leeraar
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Re: Beef roast

Post by Leeraar » Tue Dec 22, 2015 10:53 am

whatusername? wrote:
lthenderson wrote:Getting a oven thermometer that you can set the alarm for a certain internal temperature is money well spent in my opinion.
Do you have a favorite you like?
I have a Taylor. The unit is about the size of a pocket calculator. On the back it says 1470N 5310 V3043. It uses two AAA batteries.

It has a switch for Celsius / Farenheit, a temperature alert, and a timer.

Quite nice. I did a bunch or research on price / features before I bought it a couple of years ago.

My instant-read thermometer is a "Polder". I found it after going through a number of units that turned out to be garbage.

L.
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whatusername?
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Re: Beef roast

Post by whatusername? » Tue Dec 22, 2015 10:58 am

Leeraar wrote:
whatusername? wrote:
lthenderson wrote:Getting a oven thermometer that you can set the alarm for a certain internal temperature is money well spent in my opinion.
Do you have a favorite you like?
I have a Taylor. The unit is about the size of a pocket calculator. On the back it says 1470N 5310 V3043. It uses two AAA batteries.

It has a switch for Celsius / Farenheit, a temperature alert, and a timer.

Quite nice. I did a bunch or research on price / features before I bought it a couple of years ago.

My instant-read thermometer is a "Polder". I found it after going through a number of units that turned out to be garbage.

L.
Thank you. I know a carnivore who may need to receive one for the holidays. :D

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Re: Beef roast

Post by pshonore » Tue Dec 22, 2015 11:25 am

A couple variations that have worked for me.

1. Sear the meat in a hot cast iron pan for a few minutes per side before roasting.

2. Have the butcher cut off the bones, but tie them back on for roasting. Remove before carving.

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lthenderson
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Re: Beef roast

Post by lthenderson » Tue Dec 22, 2015 12:53 pm

whatusername? wrote:
lthenderson wrote:Getting a oven thermometer that you can set the alarm for a certain internal temperature is money well spent in my opinion.
Do you have a favorite you like?
We have a Taylor too.

Luke Duke
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Re: Beef roast

Post by Luke Duke » Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:39 pm

JoinToday wrote:A couple years ago I took my roast out of the refrigerator, put a probe in it, and let it sit at room temperature for 2 hours or so. I was stunned at how little the temperature increased. Maybe 1 or 2 degrees. I am not convinced of the benefit of letting it rest. But I am certain it doesn't hurt, so that is what I will do in the future.

Having said that, I used the method described in J. Kenji López-Alt's website, http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/12/step ... e-rib.html sounds like the same as described in the book. It is the ONLY way to do it (if you want to do it right). There may be many roads to Dublin, but there is only one way to cook prime rib. This is it.

1. You have to use a temp probe as jbozolich did, and do NOT open the oven until the roast is done, as stated. I think this is critical.(I did the preheat at 200 F)

2. The other thing that surprised me was how little the temperature increased after removing from the oven. I think I took mine out around 128 F, if I recall correctly. It was Perfect. My knees got weak just looking at the cut slices of prime rib -- absolutely beautiful. I was almost overcome with emotion, my wife had to give me the smelling salt (OK, a little embellishment there). But Lawry's Prime Rib couldn't do it better.

3. Although the website differs from my opinion, I believe is better to get a boneless roast (or cut the rib bones off). I think ribs distort the thermal conduction of the roast, so you are more likely to over cook the top in order for the meat near the bone to be cooked as you want. His website had a test of the taste difference with & without ribs, and with aluminum foil to act as a barrier between the ribs and roast. I recall there wasn't a taste difference, but a texture difference where the bone was. http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/12/food ... .html#bone
I do the exact same thing. A good thermometer is essential.

Also, don't call it a beef roast. It is a prime rib. Beef roast makes one think of a pot roast.

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Re: Beef roast

Post by Luke Duke » Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:43 pm

JoinToday wrote:A couple years ago I took my roast out of the refrigerator, put a probe in it, and let it sit at room temperature for 2 hours or so. I was stunned at how little the temperature increased. Maybe 1 or 2 degrees. I am not convinced of the benefit of letting it rest. But I am certain it doesn't hurt, so that is what I will do in the future.
The lower the temperature that you cook at the less the meat temp will rise while resting.

There are two main reasons to plan on a resting period:
1. So your meat doesn't overcook.
2. To allow the juices to redistribute

The slower you cook the less important a resting period it. In fact, if you sous vide, there is no resting period required.

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Re: Beef roast

Post by The Wizard » Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:58 pm

Luke Duke wrote:
JoinToday wrote:A couple years ago I took my roast out of the refrigerator, put a probe in it, and let it sit at room temperature for 2 hours or so. I was stunned at how little the temperature increased. Maybe 1 or 2 degrees. I am not convinced of the benefit of letting it rest. But I am certain it doesn't hurt, so that is what I will do in the future.
The lower the temperature that you cook at the less the meat temp will rise while resting.

There are two main reasons to plan on a resting period:
1. So your meat doesn't overcook.
2. To allow the juices to redistribute

The slower you cook the less important a resting period it. In fact, if you sous vide, there is no resting period required.
Two different things here.
JoinToday is talking about taking the roast out of the refrigerator and letting it come up close to room temperature for an hour or two prior to popping it into the oven.
Except he apparently found the center of the roast only rose from (guessing) 38 deg to 40 deg...
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Luke Duke
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Re: Beef roast

Post by Luke Duke » Tue Dec 22, 2015 4:46 pm

You are correct. I just noticed that. The term resting is usually means post-cooking.

Leeraar
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Re: Beef roast

Post by Leeraar » Tue Dec 22, 2015 5:39 pm

OP here: An update.

The roast is a 2.6 lb boneless "bottom round". I am not convinced, it has fine marbling and looks like a boneless rib eye. Anyway with only seven for dinner, I was not going to get a prime rib: The smallest I could find was 7 lbs.

The roast is seasoned with fresh rosemary, salt and ground pepper, and open on a rack in the fridge. I believe that drying out the surface of the meat is important.

On Friday morning I will take it out of the fridge and let it stand at room temperature. I will monitor the temperature at the center of the roast, through the day. My plan is to cook it at an oven temp of 175 degrees, allowing 5 hours, starting about noon. Not yet decided on the goal for the internal temperature: 125 or 130F?

L.
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goodlifer
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Re: Beef roast

Post by goodlifer » Tue Dec 22, 2015 5:45 pm

I have been searing my prime ribs first and then low. I will have to try the reverse since I don't care for that gray area right under the fat. Personally, I much prefer the roast with bones, but it may only be because I make stock. I'm not sure if there is a taste difference.
I have tried many different thermometers. I like Taylor. The CDN pen type is good, but it is too easy to accidentally switch from F to C and burn your roast. I invested in a ThermoWorks oven/alarm one and was completely unimpressed. It seemed to be exactly the same as another cheapie Chinese from Meijer I already had, and they both broke. I'm not sure I want to bother buying the Thermopen after my experience, but people seem to love it.

I just saw that your roast is a bottom round. I have only cooked that once, and I thought it was a little tough. I would have marinated it if I knew how it was prior. I haven't seen any that looked like a strip steak. The ones I saw were all pretty solid with one line of fat through the middle.

I usually cook my roasts medium rare and slice off some to cook longer in the oven, then serve it all together. Most of my people likes medium but the ones that like it more well simply refuse to eat anything not burnt to perfection.

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Re: Beef roast

Post by reneeh63 » Tue Dec 22, 2015 6:15 pm

I'm intrigued! Would something similar work for a half bone-in ham?

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Re: Beef roast

Post by Leeraar » Tue Dec 22, 2015 7:22 pm

reneeh63 wrote:I'm intrigued! Would something similar work for a half bone-in ham?
I believe so. Is the ham fresh, or cured and already cooked?

L.
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Wileycoyotepdx
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Re: Beef roast

Post by Wileycoyotepdx » Tue Dec 22, 2015 7:32 pm

I haven't tried this recipe! I'm excited to peruse it. I have tried Thomas Keller's blowtorch Prime rib, which is a classic sear and roast (low temp roast~250) but you use a blow torch for sear. It's fun to use the torch.

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Re: Beef roast

Post by sls239 » Tue Dec 22, 2015 7:41 pm

A rib roast, you would actually roast, but for a bottom round roast, I suggest a braise.

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Kevin M
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prime rib

Post by Kevin M » Tue Dec 22, 2015 7:55 pm

I am doing prime rib, or whatever I find at Costco that comes closest, for Christmas dinner. Most recipes I've looked at recommend high temp (450 - 500 F) for a short time (20-30 minutes), then low temp for the remainder. One recipe says just turn oven off after the initial high temp roasting, and it will take 2 hours more. Other recipes call for 325 or so for the remainder, but less time required.

I did something like this last time (which also was first time) I did a prime rib (boneless, so technically not prime rib I guess), and it came out great. It was from Costco, and cost about $100, which is the price of the smallest one I saw there the other day.

Letting the meat warm at room temperature before cooking is a common element in most if not all recipes. The recommended times vary greatly though. I'm leaning toward several hours.

We also are doing popovers, which require that the oven not be opened, so I just ordered a Polder Digital In-Oven Thermometer/Timer, Graphite color: Meat Thermometer so I can monitor temp without opening oven door. It is $19 from Amazon, and I got one-day shipping by ordering some other stuff. May have to compromise on the oven temp a bit for the popovers to work, or we might have to figure something else out for the popovers.

I wish I could remember exactly how I did it last time, but I think for boneless a rack is recommended. For bone-in, the bones form the rack. Ah! I found a Google Doc I created, in which I jotted down notes about the recipes, and some of the recipes themselves. Here's a link: Boneless ribeye roast recipes.

Kevin
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Re: Beef roast

Post by jfn111 » Tue Dec 22, 2015 8:09 pm

My wife wants to do the 250 degree method. We have 2-5# roasts. When the directions call for 25-30 minutes per pound is that then 30X5 or 30X10?

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Dutch
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Re: Beef roast

Post by Dutch » Tue Dec 22, 2015 8:18 pm

A bottom round roast is a tougher cut of meat.

Make sure to slice it thin and against the grain

Marinating might be a good idea as well

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Re: Beef roast

Post by mxs » Tue Dec 22, 2015 8:36 pm

jfn111 wrote:My wife wants to do the 250 degree method. We have 2-5# roasts. When the directions call for 25-30 minutes per pound is that then 30X5 or 30X10?
Should be 30x5, as long as you space the roasts a bit.

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Re: Beef roast

Post by Teague » Tue Dec 22, 2015 8:47 pm

jfn111 wrote:My wife wants to do the 250 degree method. We have 2-5# roasts. When the directions call for 25-30 minutes per pound is that then 30X5 or 30X10?
Time per unit of mass (in this case minutes per pound) is a perfectly reliable method - to ruin a roast. Or two roasts in this case. Too many uncontrollable variables involved (surface area/volume ratio which depends on food shape, oven characteristics, food starting temp, and others.)

Do yourself a big favor and use a good thermometer to check the internal temp to determine cooking time.
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jfn111
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Re: Beef roast

Post by jfn111 » Tue Dec 22, 2015 8:51 pm

Teague wrote:
jfn111 wrote:My wife wants to do the 250 degree method. We have 2-5# roasts. When the directions call for 25-30 minutes per pound is that then 30X5 or 30X10?
Time per unit of mass (in this case minutes per pound) is a perfectly reliable method - to ruin a roast. Or two roasts in this case. Too many uncontrollable variables involved (surface area/volume ratio which depends on food shape, oven characteristics, food starting temp, and others.)

Do yourself a big favor and use a good thermometer to check the internal temp to determine cooking time.
Thermometer is part of the plan. We just dug out our remote one. We just need to guestimate the time so we know when to put in the roasts. There is a big difference between 150 minutes and 300 minutes when planning a start time for dinner.

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jfn111
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Re: Beef roast

Post by jfn111 » Tue Dec 22, 2015 8:51 pm

mxs wrote:
jfn111 wrote:My wife wants to do the 250 degree method. We have 2-5# roasts. When the directions call for 25-30 minutes per pound is that then 30X5 or 30X10?
Should be 30x5, as long as you space the roasts a bit.
Thanks, that was my thought.

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Re: Beef roast

Post by drawpoker » Tue Dec 22, 2015 8:52 pm

Interesting thread here. For years I have seen the recipes where you sear the outside of the roast first, then do the slow-cooking oven method. Am a little surprised to see the reverse being recommended by some chef, as it would seem to me it 1) might, unless being done by an expert, ruin the roast by overcharring; or, 2) destroy any possibility of the cook getting home-style gravy by incinerating the bits at the bottom of the roasting pan (?)

Anyway, for the years when I was serving big family dinners with a roast, I had a hard-wired smoke detector and couldn't chance any of these high-flying (and high temp) ideas in the kitchen. Now that I replaced that detector with one where I can take the batteries out - no more big family dinners to host anymore. :(

Also, am wondering where all of you who are speaking of preparing your "prime" rib for your feasts are getting it? Around here, for years now, the top cut available in the local stores is "choice" grade. Am told by the butchers that "prime" is now so pricey it goes only to the restaurants, not to the retail markets.

:?:

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Re: Beef roast

Post by Teague » Tue Dec 22, 2015 9:03 pm

jfn111 wrote:
Teague wrote:
jfn111 wrote:My wife wants to do the 250 degree method. We have 2-5# roasts. When the directions call for 25-30 minutes per pound is that then 30X5 or 30X10?
Time per unit of mass (in this case minutes per pound) is a perfectly reliable method - to ruin a roast. Or two roasts in this case. Too many uncontrollable variables involved (surface area/volume ratio which depends on food shape, oven characteristics, food starting temp, and others.)

Do yourself a big favor and use a good thermometer to check the internal temp to determine cooking time.
Thermometer is part of the plan. We just dug out our remote one. We just need to guestimate the time so we know when to put in the roasts. There is a big difference between 150 minutes and 300 minutes when planning a start time for dinner.
Got it!
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Re: Beef roast

Post by Teague » Tue Dec 22, 2015 9:08 pm

drawpoker wrote: ...
Also, am wondering where all of you who are speaking of preparing your "prime" rib for your feasts are getting it? Around here, for years now, the top cut available in the local stores is "choice" grade. Am told by the butchers that "prime" is now so pricey it goes only to the restaurants, not to the retail markets.
:?:
Some Costcos do sell USDA prime cuts, particularly around the holidays. My favorite is to ask for a whole cryo-pak top sirloin, cap on when possible, which is often a great bargain, then cut it up myself.
Semper Augustus

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Re: Beef roast

Post by blmarsha123 » Tue Dec 22, 2015 9:12 pm

Great and timely thread! For Christmas Eve dinner for eight, I'll be attempting the reverse-sear method for tenderloin steaks: low and slow until 125 degrees and then immediately sear on a hot cast iron griddle (stovetop) for 1 - 2 minutes per side. Should result in medium rare to medium <<edit>> with a nice crust. Also following the recommendation to liberally salt and leave uncovered overnight in the fridge.

Re. where to get Prime cuts ... Around here (South Metro Denver), Costco, Safeway and Whole Foods.

Happy Christmas!
Bob
Last edited by blmarsha123 on Tue Dec 22, 2015 9:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

drawpoker
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Re: Beef roast

Post by drawpoker » Tue Dec 22, 2015 9:12 pm

Are you certain that Costco is on the level with this? Can you be sure it is the real thing?
Our markets also have the cyro pacs around the holidays also. But it is not labeled "Prime".
Just "Choice"

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Re: Beef roast

Post by blmarsha123 » Tue Dec 22, 2015 9:19 pm

Re. are you sure about Costco ... The tenderloin roast that I got last Christmas at Costco was labeled (and priced) USDA Prime.

Regards,
Bob

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Re: Beef roast

Post by bhsince87 » Tue Dec 22, 2015 9:44 pm

drawpoker wrote:Are you certain that Costco is on the level with this? Can you be sure it is the real thing?
Our markets also have the cyro pacs around the holidays also. But it is not labeled "Prime".
Just "Choice"

There is some confusion with this cut. The prime in "Prime rib" is different from beef grades (prime, choice, select, standard/commercial).

Prime rib, the roast, can actually com in prime, choice, or select grades.
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Re: Beef roast

Post by Atilla » Tue Dec 22, 2015 9:46 pm

I know this is a bit off topic, but I will sometimes buy a boneless rib roast and cut my own rib eye steaks to my exact preferred thickness. Rib roast is always a couple bucks cheaper than rib eyes.

Have a 4 pound rib roast in the fridge right now and I think I'll try the slow cook then crispy outside burn method. I was pondering whether to go charcoal grill or oven with this one. :sharebeer

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Re: Beef roast

Post by bhsince87 » Tue Dec 22, 2015 9:50 pm

Leeraar wrote:OP here: An update.

The roast is a 2.6 lb boneless "bottom round". I am not convinced, it has fine marbling and looks like a boneless rib eye. Anyway with only seven for dinner, I was not going to get a prime rib: The smallest I could find was 7 lbs.

The roast is seasoned with fresh rosemary, salt and ground pepper, and open on a rack in the fridge. I believe that drying out the surface of the meat is important.

On Friday morning I will take it out of the fridge and let it stand at room temperature. I will monitor the temperature at the center of the roast, through the day. My plan is to cook it at an oven temp of 175 degrees, allowing 5 hours, starting about noon. Not yet decided on the goal for the internal temperature: 125 or 130F?

L.
Your'e setting yourself up for disappointment! The low and slow oven method only works for very tender cuts like prime rib/ribeye, and tenderloin. A bottom round will come out of the oven crunchy/chewy. A cut like that needs HOURS to soften up. And it will dry out in the oven by that time.

I just cooked a bottom round roast sous vide last weekend. I cooked it 8 hours at 135 F, and it was still a bit tough. Put it back in and cooked it a total of 36 hours. At that point it was still a bit tougher than a good prime rib, but nice enough to eat 1/2 thick slices.
Retirement: When you reach a point where you have enough. Or when you've had enough.

drawpoker
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Re: Beef roast

Post by drawpoker » Tue Dec 22, 2015 10:01 pm

bhsince87 wrote:.....There is some confusion with this cut. The prime in "Prime rib" is different from beef grades (prime, choice, select, standard/commercial).

Prime rib, the roast, can actually com in prime, choice, or select grades.
Source, please, for your citation here?

Are you speaking as a consumer? Or a working, licensed meat butcher?

goodlifer
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Re: Beef roast

Post by goodlifer » Tue Dec 22, 2015 10:03 pm

It is called prime rib because it is a primal cut. I usually buy choice grade because the prime is too fatty and the gravy gets too greasy for me. And to be honest, I really don't want to spend that much on it. I can get it for $5.99 to $7.99 per pound around here if I don't get too picky about grading. Costco does sell prime grade, but I can't bring myself to spend $200 on a roast.

bhsince87
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Re: Beef roast

Post by bhsince87 » Tue Dec 22, 2015 10:11 pm

drawpoker wrote:
bhsince87 wrote:.....There is some confusion with this cut. The prime in "Prime rib" is different from beef grades (prime, choice, select, standard/commercial).

Prime rib, the roast, can actually com in prime, choice, or select grades.
Source, please, for your citation here?

Are you speaking as a consumer? Or a working, licensed meat butcher?
Consumer. But a hard core one! I have butchered pigs and deer, but never beef. Licenses aren't required around here.

How does wikipedia count as a reliable source in your mind? I don't believe they are licensed either. But it works for me. I'm sure you can find a more "official" site on your own.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standing_rib_roast
Retirement: When you reach a point where you have enough. Or when you've had enough.

jbuzolich
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Re: Beef roast

Post by jbuzolich » Tue Dec 22, 2015 10:18 pm

Safer to just say rib roast and avoid confusion about prime. A beef rib roast will get you what you want.

PugetSoundguy
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Re: Beef roast

Post by PugetSoundguy » Tue Dec 22, 2015 10:29 pm

Thank you everybody. What an awesome thread. After reading all of this, I want some prime rib NOW. I can't wait for Christmas.

Leeraar
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Re: Beef roast

Post by Leeraar » Tue Dec 22, 2015 10:31 pm

bhsince87 wrote:Your'e setting yourself up for disappointment!
I don't think so. I usually roast this kind of beef. The difference is it gets sliced very thin, even shaved, with a mushroom au jus. It is not served in slabs like prime rib usually is. I think this tends towards the way the British would do roast beef.

And, yes, popovers (Yorkshire Pudding) is part of the deal.

Happy holidays, everyone!

L.
You can get what you want, or you can just get old. (Billy Joel, "Vienna")

bhsince87
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Re: Beef roast

Post by bhsince87 » Tue Dec 22, 2015 11:07 pm

Leeraar wrote:
bhsince87 wrote:Your'e setting yourself up for disappointment!
I don't think so. I usually roast this kind of beef. The difference is it gets sliced very thin, even shaved, with a mushroom au jus. It is not served in slabs like prime rib usually is. I think this tends towards the way the British would do roast beef.

And, yes, popovers (Yorkshire Pudding) is part of the deal.

Happy holidays, everyone!

L.
OK, sounds like you know what to expect. Jus is a game changer! :)

Happy holidays to you too!
Retirement: When you reach a point where you have enough. Or when you've had enough.

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patrick013
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Re: Beef roast

Post by patrick013 » Tue Dec 22, 2015 11:14 pm

Nothing better than a 10 lb. sirloin beef cooked and nicely sliced
in 1/8 inch slices. Sandwiches all week long.
age in bonds, buy-and-hold, 10 year business cycle

Leeraar
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Re: Beef roast

Post by Leeraar » Tue Dec 22, 2015 11:41 pm

bhsince87 wrote:Jus is a game changer! :)
I agree. A few years ago I switched from gravy with the Thanksgiving turkey to au jus. A great move.

L.
You can get what you want, or you can just get old. (Billy Joel, "Vienna")

Green Nut
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Re: Beef roast

Post by Green Nut » Wed Dec 23, 2015 9:38 am

going to buy a rib roast today...just because of this post!!!

Luke Duke
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Re: Beef roast

Post by Luke Duke » Wed Dec 23, 2015 11:01 am

drawpoker wrote:
bhsince87 wrote:.....There is some confusion with this cut. The prime in "Prime rib" is different from beef grades (prime, choice, select, standard/commercial).

Prime rib, the roast, can actually com in prime, choice, or select grades.
Source, please, for your citation here?

Are you speaking as a consumer? Or a working, licensed meat butcher?
bhsince87 is correct. The prime in prime rib = primal

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