Old Tools

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Post Reply
User avatar
gatorman
Posts: 2493
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 9:35 am
Location: The Swamp

Old Tools

Post by gatorman » Sun Oct 11, 2015 5:32 am

I bought a deck storage chest and, of course, it came unassembled. The assembly directions said no power tools, but there was an almost unlimited number of screws that needed to be driven to put it together. Well not too long ago at a garage sale, I'd purchased a Yankee style ratcheting screwdriver for $2. ( For those of you who are unfamiliar with the Yankee screwdriver, here's a link: http://ronswoodshop.blogspot.com/2010/0 ... river.html )

I'd tossed it in my toolbox thinking it might prove to be useful if I ever had to drive a screw in a tight spot my cordless drill couldn't reach. When I saw the giant bag of screws that had to be driven, I decided to give the Yankee a try. By the time I was done, I'd gained a new appreciation for some old technology. It made driving the screws a snap. It was lightweight, had no battery to go dead, drove the screws 10 times as fast as a regular screwdriver and didn't overdrive any of them . Which brings me to the point of this post, what other old "obsolete" tools do you use that you find to be useful and just as good as modern technology, maybe better? I'm sure there are many such tools out there, waiting to be rediscovered and put back into service.

Carl53
Posts: 1607
Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2010 8:26 pm

Re: Old Tools

Post by Carl53 » Sun Oct 11, 2015 6:15 am

My Stanley Yankee push drill.
http://www.amazon.com/Stanley-03-046-Ya ... B00004UDKR

Perfect when you need a small hole quickly and don't want to bother with a power drill.

It is very hard to find bits for this unit these days although I see Garrett-Wade listing some that might work.

User avatar
SpringMan
Posts: 5361
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2007 11:32 am
Location: Michigan

Re: Old Tools

Post by SpringMan » Sun Oct 11, 2015 9:06 am

I inherited a Yankee screwdriver much like yours from my father. I still remember the warning he gave me about holding it safe. They are spring loaded and can pop open so can be dangerous if not used with care. Great tool otherwise although cordless drills make better screw drivers IMO.
Best Wishes, SpringMan

User avatar
cheese_breath
Posts: 8011
Joined: Wed Sep 14, 2011 7:08 pm

Re: Old Tools

Post by cheese_breath » Sun Oct 11, 2015 9:18 am

Haven't seen one of those things in years. Good catch.
The surest way to know the future is when it becomes the past.

pshonore
Posts: 6422
Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2009 2:21 pm

Re: Old Tools

Post by pshonore » Sun Oct 11, 2015 9:30 am

gatorman wrote: Which brings me to the point of this post, what other old "obsolete" tools do you use that you find to be useful and just as good as modern technology, maybe better? I'm sure there are many such tools out there, waiting to be rediscovered and put back into service.
Chisels, hand saws (I actually collect hand saws and have over 100 of them - I won't mention what my wife calls them), hand planes of all types, marking gauges, etc. There are tons of old tools on the net, ranging in price from a few bucks to thousands of dollars. Stanley still stocks Yankee parts although not many bits. http://www.stanleytoolparts.com/yankeeratcheting.html

123
Posts: 3818
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 3:55 pm

Re: Old Tools

Post by 123 » Sun Oct 11, 2015 1:25 pm

Somewhat off track but "Old Tools" also exist for the kitchen. When I learned to cook I was raised that an electric hand mixer was used for a lot of tasks. It made me reluctant to do certain things because assembly and cleaning of an electric hand mixer seemed to always take way too much time. I eventually just decided to try using a wire whisk and the problem was solved. I don't even think I know where my electric hand mixer is anymore.
The closest helping hand is at the end of your own arm.

User avatar
gatorman
Posts: 2493
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 9:35 am
Location: The Swamp

Re: Old Tools

Post by gatorman » Sun Oct 11, 2015 4:51 pm

123 wrote:Somewhat off track but "Old Tools" also exist for the kitchen. When I learned to cook I was raised that an electric hand mixer was used for a lot of tasks. It made me reluctant to do certain things because assembly and cleaning of an electric hand mixer seemed to always take way too much time. I eventually just decided to try using a wire whisk and the problem was solved. I don't even think I know where my electric hand mixer is anymore.
I just bought a vintage Kitchenaid stand mixer. Not sure how old it is, but the batter beater and dough hook are made of metal, so I think it's pretty old. I like it a lot, especially like the faded lemon yellow paint.
gatorman

User avatar
gatorman
Posts: 2493
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 9:35 am
Location: The Swamp

Re: Old Tools

Post by gatorman » Sun Oct 11, 2015 5:00 pm

pshonore wrote:
gatorman wrote: Which brings me to the point of this post, what other old "obsolete" tools do you use that you find to be useful and just as good as modern technology, maybe better? I'm sure there are many such tools out there, waiting to be rediscovered and put back into service.
Chisels, hand saws (I actually collect hand saws and have over 100 of them - I won't mention what my wife calls them), hand planes of all types, marking gauges, etc. There are tons of old tools on the net, ranging in price from a few bucks to thousands of dollars. Stanley still stocks Yankee parts although not many bits. http://www.stanleytoolparts.com/yankeeratcheting.html
I've bought quite a few chisels and planes. I usually can pick up a nice used chisel for less than a buck and a plane for a couple of bucks. Haven't seen many saws, I'll have to start looking closer. Lee Valley carries bit sets for the Yankee, but they get ~$25 for a set of bits.
gatorman

Jack FFR1846
Posts: 7961
Joined: Tue Dec 31, 2013 7:05 am

Re: Old Tools

Post by Jack FFR1846 » Sun Oct 11, 2015 5:30 pm

I use a small triangle file to crown guitar frets. I do repairs/improvements on guitars and every guitar I buy, I level the frets, which makes them all the exact same height then crown them, which involves making their profile round like they are new. This gives a more accurate placement also when you press the string. The "new" way to do this is with a dolphin file which has rounded files to pull across the frets. I find that using a triangle file does a far better job of getting fully cleaned frets and good rounding. It takes more skill but I like doing it and can do a good job. A good dolphin file is $150. Triangle $3.
Bogle: Smart Beta is stupid

User avatar
DaleMaley
Posts: 1581
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 8:04 pm
Location: Fairbury, Illinois
Contact:

Re: Old Tools

Post by DaleMaley » Sun Oct 11, 2015 6:40 pm

For certain jobs, you just can't beat an old nail puller.

Recently my 32 year old son was totally amazed when he saw me use an nail puller that probably belonged to my grandfather on the farm.

Just be careful and don't get your finger pinched while handling it or using it :)

Below is a picture of an old nail puller.........

Image
Most investors, both institutional and individual, will find that the best way to own common stocks is through an index fund that charges minimal fees. – Warren Buffett

User avatar
lthenderson
Posts: 3518
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2012 12:43 pm
Location: Iowa

Re: Old Tools

Post by lthenderson » Mon Oct 12, 2015 8:05 am

I like old handles. I've bought lots of tools and garden implements over the years and the handles are made from cheap pine or spruce and break all the time. I go to auctions and buy up old tools for their handles. They are made from nice solid old growth hardwood and no amount of prying or pounding can break those things.

User avatar
cheese_breath
Posts: 8011
Joined: Wed Sep 14, 2011 7:08 pm

Re: Old Tools

Post by cheese_breath » Mon Oct 12, 2015 8:21 am

I have a lot of old tools, but it's not because I go looking to buy them. It's because I don't throw them out as long as they still do the job. 40 year old electric drills and saws still do the job as good as the fancy new ones even though they might require an extension cord to reach the plug.
The surest way to know the future is when it becomes the past.

123
Posts: 3818
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 3:55 pm

Re: Old Tools

Post by 123 » Mon Oct 12, 2015 12:08 pm

cheese_breath wrote:I have a lot of old tools, but it's not because I go looking to buy them. It's because I don't throw them out as long as they still do the job. 40 year old electric drills and saws still do the job as good as the fancy new ones even though they might require an extension cord to reach the plug.
I agree. I don't have any battery-operated rechargeable tools. I just figure the battery would probably always be dead when I needed to use the tools. If it's in a charger all the time there's a loss of "vampire" power for days on end. Anyway, extension cords and hoses are marvelous things, almost as useful as Wi-Fi.
The closest helping hand is at the end of your own arm.

User avatar
gatorman
Posts: 2493
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 9:35 am
Location: The Swamp

Re: Old Tools

Post by gatorman » Tue Oct 13, 2015 6:16 am

DaleMaley wrote:For certain jobs, you just can't beat an old nail puller.

Recently my 32 year old son was totally amazed when he saw me use an nail puller that probably belonged to my grandfather on the farm.

Just be careful and don't get your finger pinched while handling it or using it :)

Below is a picture of an old nail puller.........

Image
That's a new tool to me. It looks like you'd use it by pulling back over the foot? You'd certainly have a lot of leverage. I'll be looking for one of those.
gatorman

User avatar
cheese_breath
Posts: 8011
Joined: Wed Sep 14, 2011 7:08 pm

Re: Old Tools

Post by cheese_breath » Tue Oct 13, 2015 9:33 am

AAMOF I had an opportunity to use my old manually powered miter box yesterday. Just needed to cut a couple small pieces, and it wasn't worth the trouble pulling the big electric one off the shelf.
The surest way to know the future is when it becomes the past.

User avatar
DaleMaley
Posts: 1581
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 8:04 pm
Location: Fairbury, Illinois
Contact:

Re: Old Tools

Post by DaleMaley » Sat Dec 17, 2016 12:42 pm

gatorman wrote:
DaleMaley wrote:For certain jobs, you just can't beat an old nail puller.

Recently my 32 year old son was totally amazed when he saw me use an nail puller that probably belonged to my grandfather on the farm.

Just be careful and don't get your finger pinched while handling it or using it :)

Below is a picture of an old nail puller.........

Image
That's a new tool to me. It looks like you'd use it by pulling back over the foot? You'd certainly have a lot of leverage. I'll be looking for one of those.
gatorman
The handle slides back and forth. You use your fingers to get the points at the end, just outside the head of the nail. Then you use the sliding weight to drive the points under the nail head. Then you can pull the handle out to get maximum leverage to pull out the nail. It really works slick, as long as you don't pinch your fingers when driving the weighted handle up and down..........or carrying the tool.
Most investors, both institutional and individual, will find that the best way to own common stocks is through an index fund that charges minimal fees. – Warren Buffett

texasdiver
Posts: 2719
Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2009 12:50 am
Location: Vancouver WA

Re: Old Tools

Post by texasdiver » Sat Dec 17, 2016 1:03 pm

I have an old Pulaski Axe handed down from my dad who used to carry it logging and fighting forest fires in the Gifford Pinchot back in the early 1950s. Classic forestry and fire fighting axe but also handy around the garden for clearing brush.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulaski_(tool)

I also have an old WW-II entrenching tool (folding shovel) handed down from my grandfather that is a serious piece of quality equipment and the best beach sandcastle building tool ever invented.
Last edited by texasdiver on Sat Dec 17, 2016 2:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
cheese_breath
Posts: 8011
Joined: Wed Sep 14, 2011 7:08 pm

Re: Old Tools

Post by cheese_breath » Sat Dec 17, 2016 1:38 pm

texasdiver wrote: I also have an old WW-II entrenching tool (folding shovel) handed down from my grandfather that is a serious piece of quality equipment and the best beach sandcastle building tool ever invented.
We called them fox hole shovels. I still have my father's (I'm 75) and still use it.

Also, although it's not a tool I also have his foot locker from the Army Air Force. It's been repainted and legs added for storage.
The surest way to know the future is when it becomes the past.

User avatar
DaleMaley
Posts: 1581
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 8:04 pm
Location: Fairbury, Illinois
Contact:

Re: Old Tools

Post by DaleMaley » Sat Dec 17, 2016 5:57 pm

There is a Youtube video for just about everything under the sun...........I checked and sure enough there is one showing how the old nail puller works. Start at the 3:00 minute mark for the nail puller demo...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wC5HgUU9TeU
Most investors, both institutional and individual, will find that the best way to own common stocks is through an index fund that charges minimal fees. – Warren Buffett

Tecktser
Posts: 21
Joined: Sat Jul 27, 2013 4:46 am

Re: Old Tools

Post by Tecktser » Sun Dec 18, 2016 9:26 am

DaleMaley wrote:For certain jobs, you just can't beat an old nail puller.

Recently my 32 year old son was totally amazed when he saw me use an nail puller that probably belonged to my grandfather on the farm.

Just be careful and don't get your finger pinched while handling it or using it :)

Below is a picture of an old nail puller.........

Image
That is my "go to" tool for remodeling projects. Minimal damage when taking out old boards/siding. Same brand as mine. I always get funny looks when I pull the thing out at our local charity building/repair events.

Post Reply