Brand Loyalty

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
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mbk734
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Brand Loyalty

Post by mbk734 » Sat May 09, 2015 9:03 am

Brand loyalty is very important for companies and their success. Any brands that you are loyal to and why? Any brands that turned you off and you no longer use? How important do you think brand loyalty is to a brand's success? Apple is very popular due to their fanbase. Monsanto is one of the most hated companies and they are still successful.

Mine are:
1. Honda (reliable as Toyota, but I find it better looking, more fun to drive)
2. Chromebook (not a brand technically, I like the Acer ones, they are a cheap quality alternative to Apple computers)
3. Carhartt (inexpensive but sturdy, nice looking work clothing)
4. Under Armour (pricy but nice looking and quality workout clothing)
5. Merrell shoes (comfortable work/hiking shoes, last a long time)
6. Chipotle (No GMO, quality and tasty fast food)
7. Verizon (Best coverage in the boonies and surprisingly best price compared to the other major carriers)
8. LG TV's (Sony quality, but cheaper)
9. Peet's Sumatra Bag Coffee (Order online, they roast it and then send it right away, very fresh and strong)
10. Costco/Amazon (Shopping is easy with great return policy)
11. Vanguard (obviously 8-) )
You can't stop the waves, but you can learn to surf

island
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by island » Sat May 09, 2015 9:16 am

There are several threads on this subject.

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cheese_breath
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by cheese_breath » Sat May 09, 2015 9:39 am

I am completely disloyal.
The surest way to know the future is when it becomes the past.

The Wizard
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by The Wizard » Sat May 09, 2015 9:41 am

I usually have 2-5 brands that I look at first, depending on the thing I'm looking to buy, power tools for example.
I no longer buy cheap tools, so certain brands are out from the start.
I look at reviews to narrow things down, having recently bought a compound mitre saw, then an oscillating multi-tool, and next, a replacement cordless drill, still being researched.
So no, I don't generally have strict "brand" loyalty; I'm more loyal to QUALITY, as evidenced by others who have purchased and reviewed the product in question...
Attempted new signature...

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Hawaiishrimp
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by Hawaiishrimp » Sat May 09, 2015 9:49 am

I am pretty loyal to the following brands:
Toyota/Lexus: reliability and quality
Amazon: ease of use, reasonably priced
Apple: user friendly, handsome
Vanguard: :beer
I save and invest my money, so money can make money for me, so I don't have to make money eventually.

barnaclebob
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by barnaclebob » Sat May 09, 2015 11:34 am

Michelin tires
Outdoor research gloves and hats
weber grills
black Diamond skis and skins

Longdog
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by Longdog » Sat May 09, 2015 3:04 pm

Even if it's been discussed before (what hasn't, really) I still like this topic. I like certain brands, but that doesn't mean I accept whatever they offer without shopping around. In other words, my loyalty to certain brands only means I had a great experience with them in the past, I still like their products or services, and I am keeping them on my short list for future purchases, but I will still verify that they possess the qualities I originally liked. Some brands I like:

Southwest Airlines
Heinz (for ketchup)
New Balance shoes
BMW (but the Tesla Model 3 has caught my attention, so my loyalty here is in question)
Maui Jim (sunglasses)
Weber grills
Steve

adamthesmythe
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by adamthesmythe » Sat May 09, 2015 3:16 pm

5. Merrell shoes (comfortable work/hiking shoes, last a long time)

Yes to Merrell, except for real mountain boots.

6. Chipotle (No GMO, quality and tasty fast food)

Actually their no-GMO thing disposes me AGAINST them, although I like their food. NO-GMO is anti-scientific, and adds a barrier for the use of GMO plants to combat hunger and malnutrition in the developing world.

9. Peet's Sumatra Bag Coffee (Order online, they roast it and then send it right away, very fresh and strong)

I'll buy Peet's or Starbucks depending on what's on sale in the grocery. If neither is on sale I prefer Peet's.

sawhorse
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by sawhorse » Sat May 09, 2015 5:05 pm

The Wizard wrote:I usually have 2-5 brands that I look at first, depending on the thing I'm looking to buy, power tools for example.
I no longer buy cheap tools, so certain brands are out from the start.
I look at reviews to narrow things down, having recently bought a compound mitre saw, then an oscillating multi-tool, and next, a replacement cordless drill, still being researched.
So no, I don't generally have strict "brand" loyalty; I'm more loyal to QUALITY, as evidenced by others who have purchased and reviewed the product in question...
Brand loyalty doesn't have to involve emotional attachment. Most brand loyalty does not. What you are describing is brand loyalty too.
cheese_breath wrote:I am completely disloyal.
Nonsense. This would mean that whenever you make a new purchase, you think anew about what brand to buy. When a new product comes out from a brand you have had numerous and unanimously positive experiences with, you still think there is the same risk as with a brand you have never heard of.

Don't forget that Vanguard and other investment companies are brands too. You'd be hard pressed to say that you don't trust any one company more than another.

The Wizard
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by The Wizard » Sat May 09, 2015 5:21 pm

sawhorse wrote:
The Wizard wrote:I usually have 2-5 brands that I look at first, depending on the thing I'm looking to buy, power tools for example.
I no longer buy cheap tools, so certain brands are out from the start.
I look at reviews to narrow things down, having recently bought a compound mitre saw, then an oscillating multi-tool, and next, a replacement cordless drill, still being researched.
So no, I don't generally have strict "brand" loyalty; I'm more loyal to QUALITY, as evidenced by others who have purchased and reviewed the product in question...
Brand loyalty doesn't have to involve emotional attachment. Most brand loyalty does not. What you are describing is brand loyalty too.
I'm not sure it is.
The new Ridgid compound mitre saw replaces a cheaper one from Delta.
The new Bosch oscillating multi-tool is just my second Bosch tool, joining my orbital jigsaw.
And it looks like I'll be getting a new Dewalt Li-ion cordless drill, replacing an old Craftsman model...
Attempted new signature...

SDBoggled
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by SDBoggled » Sat May 09, 2015 9:19 pm

Not sure I have loyalty, but I have repeat brand/product combos that I prefer and will include as the "value to beat" in any future purchase comparisons.

Dewalt cordless tools (bit of lock-in due to battery)
Brooks brothers non-iron shirts, many of their other styles, don't appeal
Trader Joe's: ready made salads, wines,meat, frozen veges, frozen meals, cheeses and most TJ house brand groceries (except toilet paper:Quilted Northern, or tissues:Kleenex)
Virgin Airlines and SouthWest
BMW used cars (needs to be used to get to my value price ratio)
Pentel 0.5mm mechanical pencil
Used to be IKEA kitchens (but they changed their line without backward compatibility)
Tahari dresses
Lechuza self-watering planters
Liptons tea
Jiffy peanut butter
Tirerack tires (various brands)
Mobil One oil
Bank of America (mortgages, but much more dependent on Loan Officer, than bank)
Bosch dishwasher with short cycle
Kohler shower valves as a preference, but sometimes specific style dominate and will use Grohe, Delta, hansgrohe
Toto Drake toilet
Corelle crockery
ASIC running shoes (personal fit)
Northface backpack (lifetime guarantee works)
Calphalon non-stick frypan (lifetime guarantee works)
Under Armour - heat gear and cotton T-shirts
Target Mossimo - teen boy mossimo shirts, jeans
Agree with Chipotle
I'll stop now, it seems I follow a lot more "brand" rules than I realized.

engineer4286
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by engineer4286 » Sat May 09, 2015 9:29 pm

The non-GMO thing at Chipotle is the primary reason I WILL NOT eat there. The food is good however. But the anti-scientific nonsense that's propagated by that whole crowd disturbs me and probably does way more harm than good.

sawhorse
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by sawhorse » Sat May 09, 2015 9:54 pm

The Wizard wrote:
sawhorse wrote:
The Wizard wrote:I usually have 2-5 brands that I look at first, depending on the thing I'm looking to buy, power tools for example.
I no longer buy cheap tools, so certain brands are out from the start.
I look at reviews to narrow things down, having recently bought a compound mitre saw, then an oscillating multi-tool, and next, a replacement cordless drill, still being researched.
So no, I don't generally have strict "brand" loyalty; I'm more loyal to QUALITY, as evidenced by others who have purchased and reviewed the product in question...
Brand loyalty doesn't have to involve emotional attachment. Most brand loyalty does not. What you are describing is brand loyalty too.
I'm not sure it is.
The new Ridgid compound mitre saw replaces a cheaper one from Delta.
The new Bosch oscillating multi-tool is just my second Bosch tool, joining my orbital jigsaw.
And it looks like I'll be getting a new Dewalt Li-ion cordless drill, replacing an old Craftsman model...
Okay, I didn't realize that was the full situation. I thought you meant that you gravitate toward only considering a few brands due to positive past experiences.

It still doesn't negate the fact that we are all loyal to some brands, that there are brands we buy repeatedly and/or trust more as evidenced by people's feelings toward certain investment companies.

Midnight Blue
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by Midnight Blue » Sat May 09, 2015 10:15 pm

I can't say I'm loyal to any brands. There's a local bread co. that sells super dense and delicious bread in many stores and I'm always willing to part with the extra buck because it's such high quality. Otherwise, though, I feel pretty flexible. I like to save money, and I'll often buy the CVS or Target-brand knock-off products. Sometimes I really regret it. But at other times it pays off. Interesting topic, though!

normaldude
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by normaldude » Sat May 09, 2015 10:15 pm

I think Vanguard is the only brand that I'm loyal to.

sawhorse
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by sawhorse » Sat May 09, 2015 10:26 pm

normaldude wrote:I think Vanguard is the only brand that I'm loyal to.
This is untrue unless you don't do any shopping--an admitted possibility especially for men, as there are men I know who literally shop only 1-2 times a year. Brand loyalty doesn't mean you buy that brand every single time or that the brand is part of your identity. But you can't seriously tell me that every purchase choice you make is completely independent of the brand name. Or that there aren't certain brands you buy more than others. Or that there aren't certain brands you trust more than others.

Also, the word "brand" as defined by marketers is broad. Individual people can be brands, as evidenced by the fact that they have public relations managers and image consultants. Political parties are brands. Store chains are brands.

normaldude
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by normaldude » Sat May 09, 2015 10:33 pm

sawhorse wrote:
normaldude wrote:I think Vanguard is the only brand that I'm loyal to.
This is untrue unless you don't do any shopping--an admitted possibility especially for men, as there are men I know who literally shop only 1-2 times a year. Brand loyalty doesn't mean you buy that brand every single time or that the brand is part of your identity. But you can't seriously tell me that every purchase choice you make is completely independent of the brand name. Or that there aren't certain brands you buy more than others. Or that there aren't certain brands you trust more than others.

Also, the word "brand" as defined by marketers is broad. Individual people can be brands, as evidenced by the fact that they have public relations managers and image consultants. Political parties are brands. Store chains are brands.
For household goods (like shampoo, paper towels, acetaminophen, multivitamins, etc), I'll choose the store generic brand, since it's cheaper.

For clothing, I'll try on on various brands, and based on price & fit, I'll pick a winner, and buy a ton of that brand, for now. But if another brand comes out with a cheaper, better fitting version, I'll switch in an instant, next time I need to buy that article of clothing.

For supermarket food, like orange juice, it's always a competition, based on which brand is on sale or cheaper.

For restaurants, I don't eat at chain restaurants. My decision is based on Zagat & Yelp reviews, and personal experiences. So I guess maybe I'm loyal to Zagat & Yelp? But really, if a better restaurant review source comes online, I'll throw Zagat & Yelp under the bus in a second. It's always a competition.
Last edited by normaldude on Sat May 09, 2015 10:45 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Saving$
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by Saving$ » Sat May 09, 2015 10:39 pm

Costco - price & quality
Amazon - at least I know they are a legitimate online retailer and not stealing my cc number
Tide laundry detergent - because I was having skin problems with others and it stopped with the Tide, so I stopped switching.
New Balance shoes - because they consistently fit and I can buy them at Joe's online on sale affordably
CREE LED bulbs - more lumens per watt

sawhorse
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by sawhorse » Sat May 09, 2015 10:45 pm

normaldude wrote:For household goods (like shampoo, paper towels, etc), I'll choose the store generic brand, since it's cheaper.
Then you are loyal to that brand due to the fact that it is cheaper and also the fact that you have found, through past experience, that it is satisfactory. If the store brand were cheapest but gave you head lice, then you wouldn't buy it again despite the price.
normaldude wrote: For clothing, I'll try on on various brands, and based on price & fit, I'll pick a winner, and buy a ton of that brand, for now. But if another brand comes out with a cheaper, better fitting version, I'll switch in an instant, next time I need to buy that article of clothing.

For supermarket food, like orange juice, it's always a competition, based on which brand is on sale or cheaper.
Again, these are examples of brand loyalty. You pick a winner and buy a ton of that brand. Why do you buy a ton of that brand? Because you trust that the quality control is good enough that the other pieces of clothing you buy will also fit. Consistency is a main determinant of brand loyalty. Brand loyalty also isn't permanent, so it makes perfect sense that you could stop being loyal to a brand.

Your orange juice example is also a matter of brand loyalty. If there were a dirt cheap brand that made you sick, would you buy it again even though it's dirt cheap? I hope not. So you are loyal to a few brands that you know are cheap but trust that they won't make you sick.
normaldude wrote:For restaurants, I don't eat at chain restaurants. My decision is based on Zagat & Yelp reviews, and personal experiences.
These are classic examples of brand loyalty. Zagat and Yelp are brands. Individual restaurants are also brands just like individual people can be brands. If they weren't, then they wouldn't take the time to come up with a logo, font, design etc.

normaldude
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by normaldude » Sat May 09, 2015 10:58 pm

sawhorse wrote:
normaldude wrote:For household goods (like shampoo, paper towels, etc), I'll choose the store generic brand, since it's cheaper.
Then you are loyal to that brand due to the fact that it is cheaper and also the fact that you have found, through past experience, that it is satisfactory.
What brand would that be? Walmart has their store generic brand, Target has their store generic brand, RiteAid has their store generic brand, etc. I'm not loyal to any one particular store generic brand. Cheaper price wins, regardless of brand.
sawhorse wrote:
normaldude wrote: For clothing, I'll try on on various brands, and based on price & fit, I'll pick a winner, and buy a ton of that brand, for now. But if another brand comes out with a cheaper, better fitting version, I'll switch in an instant, next time I need to buy that article of clothing.
Again, these are examples of brand loyalty. You pick a winner and buy a ton of that brand. Why do you buy a ton of that brand? Because you trust that the quality control is good enough that the other pieces of clothing you try will also fit. Consistency is a main determinant of brand loyalty.
I assume that all brands have consistency. I don't see how that is brand loyalty.

For example, let's say I try on a bunch of synthetic t-shirts, and the winner is Under Armour, so I buy a bunch of Under Armour t-shirts. If I had brand loyalty, then I would have a bias for Under Armour socks, shorts, polo shirts, etc. But for each buying decision, it's a competition. No-name brands that I don't recognize often win.
normaldude wrote:Your orange juice example is also a matter of brand loyalty. If there were a dirt cheap brand that made you sick, would you buy it again even though it's dirt cheap? I hope not.
Never happened. And if it did, it would represent brand disloyalty, not brand loyalty.
sawhorse wrote:
normaldude wrote:For restaurants, I don't eat at chain restaurants. My decision is based on Zagat & Yelp reviews, and personal experiences.
These are classic examples of brand loyalty. Zagat and Yelp are brands. Individual restaurants are also brands just like individual people can be brands.
I see brand loyalty as applying the good image of the brand on multiple products & services, over a long period of time. Like someone who has a good experience with Under Armour t-shirts, and thus buys Under Armour socks, shorts, polo shirts, etc on the assumption that Under Armour makes good stuff.

I've done that with Vanguard, for 20+ years. Any index fund that Vanguard releases, I just assume that it will be well managed, and I will bias towards it when compared with other branded index funds that are comparable in portfolio composition, expense ratio, etc.

But I honestly don't have that kind of multi-product brand bias for any other brand.

sawhorse
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by sawhorse » Sat May 09, 2015 11:09 pm

normaldude wrote:What brand would that be? Walmart has their store generic brand, Target has their store generic brand, RiteAid has their store generic brand, etc. I'm not loyal to any one particular store generic brand. Cheaper price wins, regardless of brand.
Brand loyalty doesn't have to mean just one brand.
normaldude wrote:I assume that all brands have consistency. I don't see how that is brand loyalty.
Maybe you don't shop a lot. I can tell you that some brands definitely do not have consistency. The ones that are inconsistent won't garner brand loyalty because of that inconsistency.
normaldude wrote:Never happened. And if it did, it would represent brand disloyalty, not brand loyalty.
Exactly. The concept of brand avoidance doesn't exist without the concept of brand loyalty.

I don't want to say anything that would risk revealing my identity but I can say that I am very knowledgeable and experienced when it comes to branding and branding research. I think we are applying different definitions to the term "brand loyalty". Admittedly, even branding experts disagree as to what exactly constitutes brand loyalty. But the examples you give all fall under the definition of brand loyalty as applied by many branding experts.

normaldude
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by normaldude » Sat May 09, 2015 11:11 pm

sawhorse wrote:
normaldude wrote:What brand would that be? Walmart has their store generic brand, Target has their store generic brand, RiteAid has their store generic brand, etc. I'm not loyal to any one particular store generic brand. Cheaper price wins, regardless of brand.
Brand loyalty doesn't have to mean just one brand.
"Cheaper price wins" = "Brand Loyalty"???

leonard
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by leonard » Sat May 09, 2015 11:21 pm

sawhorse wrote:
normaldude wrote:I think Vanguard is the only brand that I'm loyal to.
This is untrue...
sawhorse wrote:
cheese_breath wrote:I am completely disloyal.
Nonsense...
Impressive. Not only an expert in brand loyalty - but you know other forum members minds better than they do. Nonsense in one case. And, you understand another mind better than they do and deem their opinion "untrue"?

Do you not feel you are crossing a line here?

My mistake - I should have ASKED you if I thought that you were crossing a line. I probably can't be trusted to form my own opinion.
Leonard | | Market Timing: Do you seriously think you can predict the future? What else do the voices tell you? | | If employees weren't taking jobs with bad 401k's, bad 401k's wouldn't exist.

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climber2020
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by climber2020 » Sat May 09, 2015 11:35 pm

Probably.

I'm subconsciously manipulated into preferring certain brands over others due to the millions, if not billions of dollars spent in advertising geared toward subtly influencing my personal preferences, even without my being fully aware of it. Just like everyone else; most of whom are either too proud to admit it or too ignorant to realize it.

sawhorse
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by sawhorse » Sat May 09, 2015 11:44 pm

climber2020 wrote:Probably.

I'm subconsciously manipulated into preferring certain brands over others due to the millions, if not billions of dollars spent in advertising geared toward subtly influencing my personal preferences, even without my being fully aware of it. Just like everyone else; most of whom are either too proud to admit it or too ignorant to realize it.
Yup, exactly.

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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by sawhorse » Sat May 09, 2015 11:51 pm

leonard wrote:Impressive. Not only an expert in brand loyalty - but you know other forum members minds better than they do. Nonsense in one case. And, you understand another mind better than they do and deem their opinion "untrue"?

Do you not feel you are crossing a line here?

My mistake - I should have ASKED you if I thought that you were crossing a line. I probably can't be trusted to form my own opinion.
I don't want to give away too much about my identity. But I will tell you that if you were to look up my name on the internet, you would find that I have significant expertise in this area and have published in top academic journals.

That is not to say that there is no one on earth who does not demonstrate brand loyalty, but it is to say that that person is as rare as a manager who can consistently beat the index. That person would also be basically unable to function because every decision would be so difficult for them.

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Archie Sinclair
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by Archie Sinclair » Sun May 10, 2015 12:26 am

sawhorse wrote:
leonard wrote:Impressive. Not only an expert in brand loyalty - but you know other forum members minds better than they do. Nonsense in one case. And, you understand another mind better than they do and deem their opinion "untrue"?

Do you not feel you are crossing a line here?

My mistake - I should have ASKED you if I thought that you were crossing a line. I probably can't be trusted to form my own opinion.
I don't want to give away too much about my identity. But I will tell you that if you were to look up my name on the internet, you would find that I have significant expertise in this area and have published in top academic journals.

That is not to say that there is no one on earth who does not demonstrate brand loyalty, but it is to say that that person is as rare as a manager who can consistently beat the index. That person would also be basically unable to function because every decision would be so difficult for them.
After reading this exchange, I think you're using the word "brand" in a sense that is much broader than its everyday meaning. I don't want to reveal too much about my identity :) , but if you were to google my name you would see that I am a lawyer.

In my profession, we often use terms of art that have a specialized meaning that is different from their everyday meaning. For example, I could explain to you the three-pronged test for whether something is "unfair," as defined by the Federal Trade Commission. However, when people on Internet forums complain that something is "unfair," I don't think it's constructive for me to tell them that they're using that term incorrectly.

The good people on Internet forums are not obliged to use words in exactly the same way as a specialist would.

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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by sawhorse » Sun May 10, 2015 12:51 am

Archie Sinclair wrote:After reading this exchange, I think you're using the word "brand" in a sense that is much broader than its everyday meaning. I don't want to reveal too much about my identity :) , but if you were to google my name you would see that I am a lawyer.

In my profession, we often use terms of art that have a specialized meaning that is different from their everyday meaning. For example, I could explain to you the three-pronged test for whether something is "unfair," as defined by the Federal Trade Commission. However, when people on Internet forums complain that something is "unfair," I don't think it's constructive for me to tell them that they're using that term incorrectly.

The good people on Internet forums are not obliged to use words in exactly the same way as a specialist would.
Good point. In branding we also define the term "need" differently than most people would define it, among other jargon.

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mbk734
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by mbk734 » Sun May 10, 2015 8:43 am

Okay class we got a little off topic. :D Let's get back to the brands that have brainwashed us through marketing, word of mouth, and commercials into thinking they are the best. Brand loyalty happens to the best of us and apparently all of us whether we know it or not according to the experts (I agree). Sometimes we are loyal to a brand without even realizing it.

A quality product will often keep me buying that brand. However if I buy something again and it's not the same quality, I will often try to avoid that company in the future. I try to avoid advertisements now but they do work and companies spend millions on marketing every year. Amazon and yelp customer reviews are a big factor in buying things/choosing a restaurant now.

Apple is an expert at brand loyalty ever since the iPod captured the music world. They have good product development (especially under Steve Jobs), great customer service, and their logo is instantly recognizable. Some people are so obsessed with Apple they are called fanboys or sheep by those that don't like Apple due to the cost of their computers. Ever since the larger iPhones have been released, Apple is dominating the cell phone market again (can't believe Steve was against a bigger screen).

Amazon is another company with excellent customer service that has dominated the online shopping world even while operating at a loss to gain customer satisfaction with 2 day shipping and Amazon Prime. Many guess that once Amazon has taken over, they can then inflate their prices.
Last edited by mbk734 on Sun May 10, 2015 10:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
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tim1999
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by tim1999 » Sun May 10, 2015 9:05 am

I think my dad's been using Prell shampoo for 50+ years. That's loyal.

maxim81
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by maxim81 » Sun May 10, 2015 9:16 am

KitKat/Snickers - Had it since I was a kid
Old Spice - passed from grandpa

Was a huge fine of the following..not sure of these brands anymore...:

Samsung
Sony

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bottlecap
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by bottlecap » Sun May 10, 2015 10:54 am

mbk734 wrote:A quality product will often keep me buying that brand. However if I buy something again and it's not the same quality, I will often try to avoid that company in the future.
I am the same way. I don't think this is brand loyalty. This is more like positive brand recognition. You know that they have produced a quality product in the past, so you are willing to try it again. Once they prove unworthy, it's over.

While I'm sure that there are varying degrees, true brand loyalty leads to buying the product, almost regardless of quality, because you bought their product before. Usually, of course, you're initial experience is positive, but you continue to buy from the company despite all evidence that they do not have the best product. I have a relative that has bought only Chevrolets over the last 45 years (and he buys a lot of them), despite surveys, bankruptcies and bailouts pretty much proving that have not continued to provide a superior product during that period. Yet, he insists they do. That is brand loyalty!

However, the fact that a brand that was good (or bad) in the (recent) past allows us to narrow down our present choices does not mean we have been "fooled" or "tricked", it is a useful device to reduce the time we spend making decisions over and over again.

JT

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William4u
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by William4u » Sun May 10, 2015 11:13 am

"Loyal" to me means you stick with them through the ups and downs, through the thick and thin, in good times and bad. I am loyal to family and friends, but not to brands. If the brand is down, I won't buy it (I hope). If Toyota made unreliable cars, I would not buy them. If my friend is down of her luck, however, I'll help her out.

The psychology research of brand loyalty suggests that humans by nature are "brand loyal" to their tribe and kin, and this evolved by natural selection. Corporations play on this deep, atavistic element of the human mind to sell stuff. Tribal loyalty occurs very early in life, which is why companies advertise to and target very young children. It is a very disturbing process.

I buy products of any brands that increase value well beyond marginal utility. This is just a way of saying that I am cheap as heck, and I try not to buy something unless there is a clear and important use for it.

Much brand loyalty, IMHO, produces either marginal utility or negative utility, which is the unfortunate outcome of the hard work of marketing professionals who are experts at psychological manipulation.

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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by LadyGeek » Sun May 10, 2015 11:36 am

In reference to several earlier posts, please stay focused on the products themselves. Opinions on a company's ethical or environmental practices are off-topic.
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by rayson » Sun May 10, 2015 12:05 pm

If brand loyalty means buying more of same product or other products from same brand, then here's my list:

- Starbucks coffee
- DogFish beer
- Oberweis ice cream
- Apple products
- Toyota/Lexus cars (I enjoy quiet rides)
- Costco
- Amazon

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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by denovo » Sun May 10, 2015 1:39 pm

Costco (brand and store). The only reason I don't buy everything from Costco is because quantity-wise some if it is unfeasible. (But their quantities are a lot more reasonable than people think, they sell milk by the gallon, bananas in reasonable quantity, etc.

Vanguard

What I am No longer Loyal to- Amazon- Recently on electronics, I've noticed the best prices are elsewhere.
"Don't trust everything you read on the Internet"- Abraham Lincoln

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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by ponyboy » Mon May 11, 2015 10:43 am

I had to stop when I read Chipotle was none GMO...lol. I cant think of one single thing that we consume today that hasnt been altered (genetically modified) in the past to get it to where its at today. With that being said I eat Chipotle almost once a week!

Costco, excellent quality of almost everything. If something sucks you can return it at any time, most of which is for the life of the product (dont abuse this!)

Amazon - fast shipping with prime...once an item was not delivered even though it said it was...amazon shipped me another of the same item for free, no questions asked. Probably the only reason I tolerate the prime price.

haviana - my wife loves their flip flops for whatever reason.

Vanguard - nuff said

Other than that...im game for almost anything.

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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by mbk734 » Mon May 11, 2015 11:13 am

There is a debate over GMO's. I won't get into it here, but I can see both sides having a point. There is a market for people who don't want GMO's and Chipotle is going for it.

http://www.nongmoproject.org/learn-more/
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by poker27 » Mon May 11, 2015 11:15 am

IDK if I'm loyal purse, but I've found things that work, and continue to purchase...

Allen Edmond Shoes
Charles Tyrwhitt Button Downs
Kirkland dress pants (surprisingly nice and supposedly made in Italy)
Levis jeans
Mobil 1 oil for the bike
2nd 12 in roulette :)

I'm sure there are probably others. Mainly keep purchasing clothes products since I already know the fit, and it can be tough to replicate, or at least takes time.

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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by singern » Mon May 11, 2015 11:25 am

Charles Tyrwhitt (only when on sale) - Men's dress shirts
The Tie Bar - Men's ties
Nike - Athletic wear (I have no reason)
Fairway - local grocery stores
Food Should Taste Good Chips - (highly recommended)
Achla Hummus - (unfortunately not sold at Fairway)
Vanguard - :sharebeer
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by pshonore » Mon May 11, 2015 11:47 am

Hellmanns Mayo
Bounty paper towels (although Kirkland are probably just as good and much better value)
NO Carhartt - since they got popular, they've gone way downhill and gotten expensive. try Cabela"s instead.
AngelSoft TP
Talienti Gelato

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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by leonard » Tue May 12, 2015 7:13 pm

sawhorse wrote:
leonard wrote:Impressive. Not only an expert in brand loyalty - but you know other forum members minds better than they do. Nonsense in one case. And, you understand another mind better than they do and deem their opinion "untrue"?

Do you not feel you are crossing a line here?

My mistake - I should have ASKED you if I thought that you were crossing a line. I probably can't be trusted to form my own opinion.
I don't want to give away too much about my identity. But I will tell you that if you were to look up my name on the internet, you would find that I have significant expertise in this area and have published in top academic journals.

That is not to say that there is no one on earth who does not demonstrate brand loyalty, but it is to say that that person is as rare as a manager who can consistently beat the index. That person would also be basically unable to function because every decision would be so difficult for them.
You do realize that - whether an expert or not - you can't really say that a persons held opinion is "untrue" or "nonsense". Certainly you can take issue with facts and say that the facts are wrong or untrue. But, you don't know other poster's states of mind better than they do - thus you really don't have the ability to say their opinion is "untrue".

Example, above a poster said they were brand loyal to VG. You said that was "untrue". They know if they are brand loyal to VG, at a minimum much better than anyone else who is not a mind reader. Your expertise has no bearing on their subjective opinions.
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by tludwig23 » Tue May 12, 2015 7:42 pm

I'm not sure I'd say I'm loyal to all of the below, but there are brands with which I've always had good experiences, never had a dud and always had excellent customer service (in the rare instances when needed):

Dogfish Head (beer)
L'Ecole 41 (wine)
Park (bicycle tools)
Concept2 (rowing machines)
Rogue (weightlifting equipment)
Asics (running shoes)
Line (downhill skis)
Giordana (bicycle clothing)
Campagnolo (bicycle components)
Stumptown Roasters (coffee)
Alaska Airlines
Patagonia (clothing)
Feathered Friends (sleeping bags and down-filled clothing)
Spot (urban and commuter bicycles)
Vitamix (blenders)
Assistent a.k.a. Ankarsrum (stand mixers)
That's what I do: I drink, and I know things. --Tyrion Lannister

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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by greenfire » Tue May 12, 2015 8:49 pm

windex

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stemikger
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by stemikger » Tue May 12, 2015 9:42 pm

mbk734 wrote:Brand loyalty is very important for companies and their success. Any brands that you are loyal to and why? Any brands that turned you off and you no longer use? How important do you think brand loyalty is to a brand's success? Apple is very popular due to their fanbase. Monsanto is one of the most hated companies and they are still successful.

Mine are:
1. Honda (reliable as Toyota, but I find it better looking, more fun to drive)
2. Chromebook (not a brand technically, I like the Acer ones, they are a cheap quality alternative to Apple computers)
3. Carhartt (inexpensive but sturdy, nice looking work clothing)
4. Under Armour (pricy but nice looking and quality workout clothing)
5. Merrell shoes (comfortable work/hiking shoes, last a long time)
6. Chipotle (No GMO, quality and tasty fast food)
7. Verizon (Best coverage in the boonies and surprisingly best price compared to the other major carriers)
8. LG TV's (Sony quality, but cheaper)
9. Peet's Sumatra Bag Coffee (Order online, they roast it and then send it right away, very fresh and strong)
10. Costco/Amazon (Shopping is easy with great return policy)
11. Vanguard (obviously 8-) )
Great post. I am definitely someone who is loyal. Good products and services along with bad really stick with me. I do give companies more than one chance, but after I get screwed twice, you lost me. I wanted Ford to be a car I would drive my entire life because it reminded me of my dad and growing up. However, after two lemons in a row, I would never buy another Ford car again. Having said that I bought a 2009 Nissan Versa and am so impressed with their cheapest vehicle, it looks like they will have me for life.

I definitely agree with several companies on your list. Chromebook is the best kept secret in computing and Costco and Amazon are my favorites. I can honestly say Amazon has the best customer service all the way around. Whether it is returns or technical assistance with my Kindle. They are very impressive and I have been a customer for quite a while now. I am also impressed with Kenmore kitchen appliances. They last forever. And lastly, I'm a Coke guy all the way.
Choose Simplicity ~ Stay the Course!! ~ Press on Regardless!!!

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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by dgdevil » Tue May 12, 2015 9:58 pm

engineer4286 wrote:The non-GMO thing at Chipotle is the primary reason I WILL NOT eat there. The food is good however. But the anti-scientific nonsense that's propagated by that whole crowd disturbs me and probably does way more harm than good.
I'm not even sure the food is that good, is it? As in good for you ... http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015 ... potle.html

About the only brand I stuck with through thick and thin was United Airlines. But they have devalued loyalty in the last year or so. Other than that, I am price-sensitive, and my groceries are mostly store-brand, i.e. Trader Joe's or Kroger.

I avoid anything associated with Warren Buffett.

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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by sawhorse » Wed May 13, 2015 1:39 am

leonard wrote:Example, above a poster said they were brand loyal to VG. You said that was "untrue". They know if they are brand loyal to VG, at a minimum much better than anyone else who is not a mind reader. Your expertise has no bearing on their subjective opinions.
I said that it was untrue that they could be loyal to only Vanguard, and not any other brand in any other offering category, unless they don't shop, and for that matter don't vote, don't use a computer, don't watch television, don't read any periodicals, etc. Under a strict definition of the term, it is impossible for someone to practically function and make decisions if they had no brand loyalty, and it would reflect a cognitive functional deficiency that is found in some rare types of amnesia.

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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by mbk734 » Wed May 13, 2015 7:32 am

sawhorse wrote:
leonard wrote:Example, above a poster said they were brand loyal to VG. You said that was "untrue". They know if they are brand loyal to VG, at a minimum much better than anyone else who is not a mind reader. Your expertise has no bearing on their subjective opinions.
I said that it was untrue that they could be loyal to only Vanguard, and not any other brand in any other offering category, unless they don't shop, and for that matter don't vote, don't use a computer, don't watch television, don't read any periodicals, etc. Under a strict definition of the term, it is impossible for someone to practically function and make decisions if they had no brand loyalty, and it would reflect a cognitive functional deficiency that is found in some rare types of amnesia.
I agree. I think if you buy the same thing more than once you are in a way "loyal" to what you bought because you liked it enough to buy it again. Everyone does this. Of course if you're really loyal you buy it repeatedly because you think it's so good whether it's food, drinks, clothing, electronics, car company, etc.
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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by mak1277 » Wed May 13, 2015 8:07 am

I would say I have a brand "preference" for many things, but only one brand that I'm truly "loyal" to.

I would never buy an alternative to Oreos. Ever. I would just stop eating sandwich cream cookies if Oreos weren't available. So I have brand loyalty to Oreos.

Otherwise, I do have some strong brand preferences:
- DarnTough socks for hiking
- Brooks Brothers no-iron dress shirts
- Chipotle
- I prefer Pepsi to Coke, but I'd never go out of my way to get it...Is that loyalty?

But in each of these cases, I am not so loyal as to use these products exclusively. In the example of Chipotle, my "preference" for Chipotle is due more to proximity to my house than to a strong desire for their food instead of, say, Baja Fresh or Qdoba.

Most of my decisions are based on convenience, more than any loyalty to a particular brand. I rarely look at/care about the specific brand of something that I buy...but I look at the features I need, the style I like, etc. at the time of the purchase.

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Re: Brand Loyalty

Post by core4portfolio » Wed May 13, 2015 8:14 am

Vanguard
Amazon
Costco
Sketchers shoe
Brita water filter
Samsung TV
Toyota
Lenovo
Corelle kitchen dinning set
Sony sound bars
Coke :beer
Apple product
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