Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Candor
Posts: 180
Joined: Sat May 28, 2011 4:25 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by Candor » Fri Mar 20, 2015 9:17 pm

If it were me I would get a S&W or Ruger but if you're not that into guns and just looking for a good quality reliable revolver for a reasonable price I think a Taurus is your best bet. They tend to have some mixed reviews on their semi-auto pistols but the revolvers are good quality firearms and well worth taking a look at. You may want to consider getting a .357 mag which will also shoot .38 caliber and is cheaper to practice with and less recoil.

gbru316
Posts: 279
Joined: Fri Jan 23, 2015 11:59 am

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by gbru316 » Fri Mar 20, 2015 9:20 pm

kjvmike wrote:From someone with a LE background a fair bit of training/experience -

The gun for Bogleheads is a 9mm Glock. Affordable rounds, good capacity, varying sizes. It's built like a Toyota or Honda - extremely reliable, extremely easy to maintain and clean. In fact, they recommend minimal cleaning. I've honestly never seen one at fault for going wrong in thousands of rounds fired by multiple people training with me. Those who bought other brands would be more likely to hold up the entire session by having to stop for jams or misfires. Mine is a 2007 model carried on duty & for training since I bought it new. Never one issue.

I think the Sig brand is about as reliable but is *far* heavier and has more parts.

It's all about the maximum chance of success when one pulls the trigger to make a bang in the appropriate direction. I don't feel the same way about other brands I've run in to.
I'll second this advice. I bought a Glock 26 for home defense. Had a CCP but when I sat down and thought about why I had a CCP, I decided it wasn't necessary. Carrying was also a PITA, so I let it lapse.

Here's what funneled my cash to Glock:
100,000-Round 9mm Torture Test

Written by Chuck Taylor

On four occasions since 1990, I've written articles about a continuing evaluation I've been conducting to ascertain the longevity of the Glock Model 17 9mm pistol. The first of these, appearing in the February, 1993, issue of Combat Handguns, contained my findings as to the weapon's performance and durability after 33.000 rounds fired. At this juncture, I stated:

* "I carried it in the rain, snow, dust and mud. I carried it when the temperatures were over 100 degrees and when they were 40 below.

* "I presented the gun more than 10.000 times from it's plastic slide holster, speed loaded it 2.000 times, performed over 5.000 tactical loads, shot it weak-handed in excess of 2,500 times and field-stripped it 250 times.

* "From the beginning, I resolved to grind it into the dirt, abuse it like no gun I ever had."

* "Why? To find out the truth about Glocks, for once and for all...

* "And I succeeded in doing just that. In a 30-month period, I fired 33.000 rounds, all factory loads, of every imaginable type made–– and it ate them all, almost without a single malfunction. I say 'almost' because on the 32,994th round, I finally had one–– a failure to feed! And this in spite of the fact that I cleaned the gun every 10.000 rounds whether it need it or not!

* "100 rounds short of the 5.000th shot, both factory-provided magazines ceased to hold the slide open after the last shot, although they both continued to function normally otherwise. At round number 11.000 a second set did the same and was replaced by another.

* "By the 500th holster presentation, the left side of the front site was so badly worn that a proper site picture was no longer possible. It was subsequently replaced with a steel version.

* "By round number 16.000, I could see steel through the finish–– but it never did rust, although it was exposed repeatedly to rain, snow, perspiration and even blood.

* "The trigger pull, originally 5.5 pounds, got smoother and a bit lighter, but it never did double or demonstrate a glitch of any kind.

* "And after all this, it still shoots into 3 inches at 25 meters, not much different than when it was new."

Impressed, to say the least, I was still determined to see the test though to the point where the gun failed. So, although the piece had passed the 33.000-round mark without significant negative results or breakage, I continued the test.

The months went by and the test continued. By the end of the summer, 1993, the gun had shot 50.000 rounds without a hitch. Among my additional observations published in Glock Autopistols 1995, were these:

"And now, after 50.000 rounds, nothing has really changed. It still:

* "Functions reliably. In fact, not a single additional stoppage has occurred.

* "Prints inside the 9-ring of a 25-meter pistol target, exactly as it did when it was new.

* "Shows no additional finish wear.

"Exhibits no bore corrosion.

"Clearly, the Glock M-17 is a heck of a pistol and, as a survival instrument, is well worthy of our consideration. It is well-designed, well-made and capable of surviving a wide variety of environmental conditions. It will feed the entire spectrum of bullet shapes and functions reliably with virtually all power levels of 9mm ammunition. In addition, it resists corrosion magnificently and its design causes minimal wear on working parts, giving it an unbelievable long service life.

"Ugly? Maybe, maybe not! It depends on what's important to you–– cosmetics, or function. Regardless, it's my opinion that the Glock 17 is not only a winner, but may well be the world's best 9mm pistol. Obviously, only time will tell, but in the meantime, I've got 25.000 more rounds of 9mm ammunition to run through it to find out."

25.000 more
And the test continued. By February, 1995, the 25.000 rounds were expended, bringing the total to an unbelievable 75.000! Yet, the gun was still going strong, showing no indications whatsoever of impending failure. I replaced nothing–– no springs, firing pins, connectors or any other parts. In fact, viewed from the broad perspective, the gun had actually outlived it's magazines–– six two-mag sets at that point.

Truthfully, I had run out of things to do to the gun. Short of running over it with a car or freezing it into a solid block of ice–– both which I regarded as silly, since they fail to mirror real-world conditions and therefore prove nothing–– I had repeatedly exposed the gun to everything. In the July, 1995, issue of Combat Handguns and Summer, 1995, issue of Glockster, I said:

* "After more than 70.000 holster presentations, I can detect no additional finish wear from that which appeared by 20.000 presentations.

* "The bore is still without corrosion or excessive wear; the piece still shoots inside the 9-ring of a 25-meter pistol target, using the offhand Weaver Stance. In fact, to determine if any deterioration of intrinsic accuracy had occured, I fired it from 35 meters in a Ransom Rest–– the worst groups were 2 inches!

* "As an example of its practical accuracy capability, I offer the following. With the test gun, I was able to perform the following:

1. "Reliably get center-hits on a 18 x 30-inch steel silhouette target at 75 meters, knocking down five such silhouettes in under ten seconds.

2. "Take a whitetail deer with a single shot behind the shoulder at a laser-measured 70 meters.

3. "Successfully pass the ASAA Handgun Combat Master test with it, presenting it from concealed carry, shooting a score of at least 383 out of a possible 400."

My other observations at that time included:

* "Internal parts exhibited no real wear or deterioration.

* "The polycarbonate frame, though it had at one spot worn smooth from holster contact, appeared intact and without discernible deterioration.

* "After more than 50.000 speed loads and an equal number of tactical loads, the magazine well was scarred somewhat but still serviceable.

* "While the 56,103rd round blew a primer, the gun was undamaged. The resulting stoppage, a Type 3 (Feedway) was quickly cleared and the weapon returned to service.

* "The trigger remained at 5.1 pounds, a reduction from it's original poundage of only 0.4 pounds. It was still smooth and had a crisp let-off.

* "It was discovered that magazine service life could be dramatically increased by loading only 15, rather than the rated 17, rounds of ammunition. If a 'Plus-Two' floorplate is utilized, then–– and only then–– should a full 17 rounds be loaded. This prevents the follower spring from being fully compressed, thus causing it to soften and finally 'set', as the expression goes.

* "The Trijicon (tritium) sights installed early in the test were still completely serviceable."

It looked like the test was over. The pistol had survived an incredible 75.000 rounds and was completely intact. I had my desired data-base–– the Glock M-17 was irrefutably a terrific pistol. In fact, I was so impressed that I concluded my article in Combat Handguns with this statement:

"Pretty, it ain't, especially after all it's been through. On the other hand, beauty is said to be in the eye of the beholder, and to me, the Glock is a tool, not an objet d'art. This being the case, we must view it differently–– function, not aesthetics, is the prime criteria. Viewed from this perspective, there can be no doubt that the Glock M-17 looks mighty good indeed."

Well, I just couldn't leave it alone. My curiosity about just how long the gun could survive continued to be intense. So, from my stores, I broke out an additional 25.000 rounds of assorted 9mm ammo and continued the test.

And now, the fall of 1995, after having fired a total of 100.000 rounds of virtually all kinds of ammunition...

Nothing has changed! The gun looks the same, feels the same, functions the same as it did before. I've done everything within reason to this gun. I've carried it all over the world, quite literally in every environmental condition known to man–– the steaming jungles of Latin America, the windblown deserts of the southwestern U.S., the 40-below zero tundra of Alaska in the winter.

And it worked–– every time. In fact, since I discovered that loading 15, rather than the rated 17, rounds into the magazine prevented the follower spring from softening, I haven't had a single malfunction. Both magazines used in this last 25.000 portion of my test remain strong and completely serviceable. And, by way of confirmation, I replaced the old springs in the magazines that failed during the test with new ones from Glock, and they, too, function perfectly.

I am especially impressed by the lack of apparent finish wear, even after over 100.000 holster presentations. The gun looks exactly as it did at 20.000! I've actually worn out several holsters, finally selecting the M-D Labs "Thunderbolt" (which I codesigned with M-D honcho Kevin McClung) and matching mag carrier as the best. It's super-fast, yet secure and highly concealable, and being made of Kydex, it's by far the toughest rig now in existence.

The magazine well, although slightly scarred from in excess of 100.000 insertions, also remains entirely functional and looks much like it did in the early stages of the test.

Internal parts, too, look the same. I just can't find any discernible signs of deterioration. The piece shoots just as accurately as it did before and functions flawlessly.

So, in conclusion, the Model 17 9mm continues to defy wear, tear, corrosion and...well, me! I've thrown the whole book of tricks at this gun and yet, as this is written, it continues in service. Obviously, the Model 17 is a terrific handgun–– so terrific that I'd quite willingly bet my life on this one, even after all it's been through. What better recommendation can I give, eh?


Copyright 1995 by Harris Publications, Inc.

DFrank
Posts: 474
Joined: Thu Mar 20, 2014 10:44 pm
Location: SoCal

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by DFrank » Fri Mar 20, 2015 10:02 pm

PoppyA wrote:Revolvers are the Chevy trucks of guns. Dependable & easy to drive.
Semi automatics (ie:glocks) are high performance vehicles. More persnickety.
In principle yes, revolvers are more reliable. As a practical matter, I've found modern semi-automatic pistols to be extremely reliable. There is a reason that all police have changed from revolvers to semi-automatic pistols. I'd suggest that Glocks are among the most reliable pistols available. Between my wife and I we own 5 different semi-automatic pistols, and having shot thousands of rounds through them we've not had any reliability issues at all. I think the benefits of carrying more ammunition, even in a state like CA where magazine capacity is limited to 10 rounds, are worth any tiny tradeoff in reliability.
Dave

Professor Emeritus
Posts: 2628
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2012 6:43 am

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by Professor Emeritus » Fri Mar 20, 2015 10:29 pm

jhfenton wrote:
Professor Emeritus wrote:
Fletch wrote:Pistols are semi-automatics, Revolvers are, well, revolvers but are not actually pistols

sorry NO

Pistol is a noun It is a hand held firearm
Revolving, automatic, semi automatic, horse,wheel-lock, rifled, flintlock, double barreled, machine, navy, Colt, Browning, Lugar etc are all adjectives that can be used to modify the noun "pistol"

Origin
mid 16th century: from obsolete French pistole, from German Pistole, from Czech pišt'ala
Well in Fletch's defense, there is a large part of the American firearms community in which a pistol is defined as a firearm with a single chamber integral to the barrel designed to be held unsupported in the hands. Per this definition, a revolver is not a pistol, as it has multiple chambers, none of which are integral to the barrel. But a pistol need not be semi-automatic. You can have a single-shot pistol or a fully-automatic pistol, just not a "revolver pistol" according to this exacting definition.

I will admit that this definition is not universal, but it is a widespread technical distinction made by those of us who scrupulously use magazines in our pistols rather than "clips."
:-) It is not a technical distinction it is folk etymology,

To quote Guns and Ammo
Pistol vs. Handgun
There is some gray area with this one. Some use the term “handgun” to describe any hand-held firearm, but only use “pistol” in reference to semi-automatic handguns — not revolvers. I’m of the school that believes pistol and handgun may be used interchangeably. Here’s why.

One authoritative source, The NRA Firearms Sourcebook, defines a pistol as “a generic term for a hand-held firearm. Often used more specifically to refer to a single-shot, revolver or semi-automatic handgun.

Then there’s the historical record. Though there’s debate over whence the term “pistol” arose, by the late 16th century it was commonly used to describe any hand-held gun. It even appeared in works by William Shakespeare. Then along came Samuel Colt, who described his cylinder-firearm invention as a “revolving pistol.”

“Pistol” was an established part of the vernacular long before the semi-auto handgun. Therefore it’s safe to say all handguns are pistols, and all pistols are handguns.

Read more: http://www.gunsandammo.com/gun-culture/ ... z3UzBqJBd7

I have worked in technical safety regulation for over 40 years. In any regulated area words , concepts and classifications "matter". e.g. I presume you are contrasting a clip with a removable/ detachable magazine. :-)

Alex Frakt
Founder
Posts: 10853
Joined: Fri Feb 23, 2007 1:06 pm
Location: Chicago
Contact:

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by Alex Frakt » Fri Mar 20, 2015 10:57 pm

Just a note on travelling through states with a firearm (as opposed to residents travelling within their own state). Federal law allows you to transport unloaded firearms and ammunition as long as they are in an inaccessible trunk or locked container other than a console or glovebox. This trumps any and all more restrictive state or local laws.

Here's the actual law,: 18 U.S. Code § 926A - Interstate transportation of firearms
Notwithstanding any other provision of any law or any rule or regulation of a State or any political subdivision thereof, any person who is not otherwise prohibited by this chapter from transporting, shipping, or receiving a firearm shall be entitled to transport a firearm for any lawful purpose from any place where he may lawfully possess and carry such firearm to any other place where he may lawfully possess and carry such firearm if, during such transportation the firearm is unloaded, and neither the firearm nor any ammunition being transported is readily accessible or is directly accessible from the passenger compartment of such transporting vehicle: Provided, That in the case of a vehicle without a compartment separate from the driver's compartment the firearm or ammunition shall be contained in a locked container other than the glove compartment or console.

tibbitts
Posts: 8047
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 6:50 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by tibbitts » Fri Mar 20, 2015 11:00 pm

It seems like among RVers, shotguns are the preferred self-defense weapon, for a variety of reasons. You might ask over on RV.net, since some of the considerations are somewhat RV/travel-specific.

thomase
Posts: 148
Joined: Fri Feb 13, 2009 7:48 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by thomase » Sat Mar 21, 2015 2:34 am

You'll have to decide revolver or semi-auto. For the two cartridges you listed, a 38spl is going to be a revolver, and 40SW is a semi-auto. But as I recommend to anyone who asks, if you could only have one handgun, I say get a 4-inch 357mag, like a Smith & Wesson 686 or a Ruger GP100, either of which can also shoot 38spl.

Professor Emeritus
Posts: 2628
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2012 6:43 am

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by Professor Emeritus » Sat Mar 21, 2015 3:48 am

Alex Frakt wrote:Just a note on travelling through states with a firearm (as opposed to residents travelling within their own state). Federal law allows you to transport unloaded firearms and ammunition as long as they are in an inaccessible trunk or locked container other than a console or glovebox. This trumps any and all more restrictive state or local laws.

Here's the actual law,: 18 U.S. Code § 926A - Interstate transportation of firearms
Notwithstanding any other provision of any law or any rule or regulation of a State or any political subdivision thereof, any person who is not otherwise prohibited by this chapter from transporting, shipping, or receiving a firearm shall be entitled to transport a firearm for any lawful purpose from any place where he may lawfully possess and carry such firearm to any other place where he may lawfully possess and carry such firearm if, during such transportation the firearm is unloaded, and neither the firearm nor any ammunition being transported is readily accessible or is directly accessible from the passenger compartment of such transporting vehicle: Provided, That in the case of a vehicle without a compartment separate from the driver's compartment the firearm or ammunition shall be contained in a locked container other than the glove compartment or console.
of course this does not apply unless you prove you are in the actual process of "transport(ing) a firearm for any lawful purpose from any place where he may lawfully possess and carry such firearm to any other place where he may lawfully possess and carry such firearm"
Any break in the journey where the guns are accessible may subject you to local laws.

Also many cars give direct access to the trunk. So locked containers are critical

DSInvestor
Posts: 10891
Joined: Sat Oct 04, 2008 11:42 am

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by DSInvestor » Sat Mar 21, 2015 4:12 am

If your travels take you into Canada, do your homework. Here's a page from the US Embassy in Canada on Bringing Weapons into Canada:
http://canada.usembassy.gov/traveling_t ... anada.html

Here's a link to a page at Canada Border Services Agency:
http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications ... 4-eng.html

There is a tv show called Border Security that follows Canadian border agents as they process travelers in secondary screening entering Canada. Make sure you do your research and declare all items.
Wiki

User avatar
rustymutt
Posts: 3732
Joined: Sat Mar 07, 2009 12:03 pm
Location: Oklahoma

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by rustymutt » Sat Mar 21, 2015 5:51 am

Something I personally like in a hand gun is a safety. Most don't have one, but some handguns do. I enjoy the extra safe environment of safety myself. Yes you have to remove the safety to fire the gun. This takes time, and some would argue that's not in your best interest, but neither is blowing a hole in your leg. Safety first for me.
I'm amazed at the wealth of Knowledge others gather, and share over a lifetime of learning. The mind is truly unique. It's nice when we use it!

User avatar
Hexdump
Posts: 1615
Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 7:28 am
Location: Houston, Texas

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by Hexdump » Sat Mar 21, 2015 6:03 am

Fletch wrote:
stev wrote:Nothing fancy. But a good brand.
Something to carry in my Motorhome when I travel.
Like a 38 or 40 cal.
A revolver/ double action/ external hammer.... for example.
I know nothing about guns. I am in CA.
Any recommendations/ comments. Thanks.
Not trying to be a smart a$$. Pistols are semi-automatics, Revolvers are, well, revolvers but are not actually pistols. Just trying to help you if you go to a gun site and ask questions. Some thoughts: first you need to decide what you are going to use it for, then how much you are willing to practice, and third, are you only going to travel in one state (legal stuff), and are you willing to get thoroughly trained in safe use.

... Fletch
Just for my benefit, when did they start naming them pistols and revolvers ? Being of ancient years here, I always thought there were only pistols, rifles, and shotguns. Pistols were either revolvers or (semi)automatics.

tphp99
Posts: 330
Joined: Sun Jan 03, 2010 8:47 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by tphp99 » Sat Mar 21, 2015 6:15 am

jhfenton wrote:
HomerJ wrote:
Mr-et-Mrs-R wrote:Learn how to fire while under stress or duress.
How does one learn this?
Training and competitions. It's not the kind of thing a normal range will let you practice. Most don't even like you to draw from a holster. But you can take training focused on real life situations. You can also compete in pistol competitions (IDPA, IPSC, USPSA, etc) to get practice under stress (a different kind of stress, but it's still stress).

For example, we have an excellent firearms school in south central Ohio: http://tdiohio.com/ I've taken several classes very practical classes there. (In one advanced concealed carry class, we even pulled our cars up to the range and practiced shooting out of our cars.)
Why is that?

acanthurus
Posts: 372
Joined: Sun Aug 04, 2013 8:02 am

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by acanthurus » Sat Mar 21, 2015 6:47 am

Removed
Last edited by acanthurus on Tue Oct 31, 2017 3:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.

TT
Posts: 495
Joined: Sat Oct 17, 2009 7:27 am

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by TT » Sat Mar 21, 2015 7:06 am

I have owned handguns for many years both revolvers and semi auto pistols. I personally prefer Smith and Wesson large frame (N) revolvers for personal home protection.
.45 ACP with full moon clips and .45 Long Colt -both have plenty of energy without excessive recoil. Ammo selection is just as important as caliber as there have been many advances in bullet technology in recent years. Practice diligently with whatever you decide and hope you never need to utilize your acquired skills. BTW - a 12 gauge double is my choice for the first line of defense and handguns are backup.
Good Luck.

mjb
Posts: 97
Joined: Sat Nov 30, 2013 11:43 am

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by mjb » Sat Mar 21, 2015 7:56 am

If there OP is still reading, my advice.

Take a class taught by a certified instructor that provides firearms to test. I cannot stress this enough. Your local gun shop should be able to direct you to one. And get one that covers revolvers and semi-autos. Possibly even a shotgun class as others have suggested. You may find you don't want to own one.

Research laws everywhere you go. Second part of this Research the laws where you will be.

Only after those steps should you look into purchasing. Make sure you buy a cleaning kit, eye and ear protection, and a safe/lock box.

I always suggest a .357 with a 4 to 6 inch barrel. They use two ammo type you can always get, .38 special and .357. The recoil of .38 special is pretty low in a .357 revolver. They are incredibly easy to maintain and simple to operate. Some people complain about only 6 shots. My instructor friends like to remind people that most personal defense scenarios are over after 3 shots total. I like S&W and Ruger, but I also own a Taurus/Rossi which I am happy with and was half the price. I am also more comfortable with a used revolver than a used semi-auto if you want to save money.

I suggest you find a firearm store with a range. Some have range rental of their top selling models available. Find one you are comfortable with.

As others have suggested, a shotgun, 12 or 20 gauge, would probably be easier from a legal standpoint and you may be more comfortable with a long gun.

One last note, practice.

From a cost perspective, a class like I described could run anywhere from $100 to $300. Trying at a store, $50 to $150. A lower end revolver $300-$400, high end $500+, maybe less if used. Cleaning kit and eye/ear protection about $30-$40. You would probably need to spend $100+ on ammo to get proficient. Realistically, the lowest the whole process would cost would be $600. This is ignoring a permit.

I hope this helps.

User avatar
deanbrew
Posts: 1279
Joined: Wed Jul 21, 2010 12:05 pm
Location: The Keystone State

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by deanbrew » Sat Mar 21, 2015 8:11 am

Another reasonable option for the sort of close distances one would have in and around an RV would be a handgun revolver shotgun, for lack of a better term. The Taurus Judge was the first on the market, and is still available, but S&W brought out the Governor a couple of years ago, and nearly all reviews I've read give the S&W better marks for workmanship, quality and value. The S&W Governor is a 6-shot revolver that chambers .45 Auto as well as .410 shotshells. Many ammo makers have brought out interesting .410 shotshells for self-defense. Unlike traditional shotguns, which don't provide much shot spread until more than 20 yards (contrary to the popularly-repeated untruth that a shotgun will spread out in distanced normally encountered in a home), a .410 shotshell fired from a Judge or Governor will indeed spread out within 10 or 20 feet.

The Judge or Governor are a bit too large and heavy for all-day carrying, but I think they would be fine for a glove box, cabinet or coat pocket.
"The course of history shows that as the government grows, liberty decreases." Thomas Jefferson

John3754
Posts: 1289
Joined: Tue Mar 19, 2013 8:56 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by John3754 » Sat Mar 21, 2015 8:48 am

The OP has received a lot of good advice regarding getting training and learning the local laws. Here's my $0.02 on this subject...the conventional wisdom is that new shooters should always start on revolvers, but I have found this to not be universally true. I have experience helping multiple new shooters get started and on more than one occasion they've picked up revolvers and not only hated shooting them, but also shot poorly with them. Put a semiauto in that same persons hands though and they love it and shoot much better. It's really matter of personal preference, but it's my experience that the long heavy trigger pull of a double action revolver is a deterrent for many people (both new and experienced), and I think it's a good idea to try both platforms before drawing a conclusion, rather than just following convention.

User avatar
bottlecap
Posts: 5855
Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 11:21 pm
Location: Tennessee

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by bottlecap » Sat Mar 21, 2015 8:55 am

tphp99 wrote:
jhfenton wrote:
HomerJ wrote:
Mr-et-Mrs-R wrote:Learn how to fire while under stress or duress.
How does one learn this?
Training and competitions. It's not the kind of thing a normal range will let you practice. Most don't even like you to draw from a holster. But you can take training focused on real life situations. You can also compete in pistol competitions (IDPA, IPSC, USPSA, etc) to get practice under stress (a different kind of stress, but it's still stress).

For example, we have an excellent firearms school in south central Ohio: http://tdiohio.com/ I've taken several classes very practical classes there. (In one advanced concealed carry class, we even pulled our cars up to the range and practiced shooting out of our cars.)
Why is that?
Safety and liability. At the range, your pistol, err... Handgun, err.... Revolver or whatever must always be pointed down range when it is ready to fire (which means any time it's not completely unloaded with the action open). Nobody wants a random person in the next lane practicing his cowboy moves. Bullets tend to shoot through things. And they hurt.

JT

stev
Posts: 61
Joined: Wed May 09, 2012 12:21 am
Location: Northern CA, near OR border

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by stev » Sat Mar 21, 2015 9:55 am

I am the OP.
Thanks for all of your input.
I will take the time and digest all the info/ ideas you have given me.
I appreciate all the comments for someone like me new to guns.
And will let you know what I buy.

Kuna_Papa_Wengi
Posts: 24
Joined: Sun Mar 08, 2015 1:55 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by Kuna_Papa_Wengi » Sat Mar 21, 2015 10:23 am

I'd recommend the Glock 19. It's Glock's mid-size 9mm. I think you'll find a 9mm semi-auto easier to shoot accurately. I second the recommendations for training. For someone new to firearms, training is a must have to be able to use the gun effectively and to cultivate the proper mindset needed to use a gun defensively.

Calguns.net is a great place for California specific information.

tibbitts
Posts: 8047
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 6:50 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by tibbitts » Sat Mar 21, 2015 10:37 am

The OP didn't specifically say, but "self-defense" could mean from humans, or from animals, or both. The responses might have been completely different if including the animal scenario. Some firearms that may be very effective on humans may not be so effective on large animals.

whomever
Posts: 782
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2012 5:21 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by whomever » Sat Mar 21, 2015 10:52 am

>>Most don't even like you to draw from a holster.

>Why is that?


Drawing and, even more so reholstering seem like simple things, but doing so safely is a surprisingly complex operation. For example, when reholstering to concealed carry type holsters, almost all novices angle the muzzle in towards their body as the muzzle goes into the top of the holster. That's the natural way to do it - and it's not safe, because if the gun discharges as it's holstered, you end up shooting yourself, and at a bad angle (not a surface graze).

Secondly, people tend to try to speed things up too soon, before the proper muscle memory has been formed. They get so into the quick draw that their finger goes into the trigger guard too soon, or try to reholster quickly with their finger still on the trigger. When the finger, still on the trigger, hits the mouth of the holster ... boom.

Etc, etc. IMHE most shooters I meet at the range have learned to safely shoot off a table. Far fewer can draw and reholster safely.

User avatar
Ged
Posts: 3616
Joined: Mon May 13, 2013 1:48 pm
Location: Roke

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by Ged » Sat Mar 21, 2015 11:01 am

Training and care is very important. Owning a firearm is a big responsibility. If you don't believe me look up the term 'Glock Leg".

Plaxico Burress found out all about this. He was lucky to hit only his leg sticking that thing into his waistband. He could have materially affected his ability to father children.

The other thing to be very careful about is crossing state lines with a gun in your RV. You may be up on all CA requirements but say if you go into another state that has different rules you could get into a whole heap of trouble.

killjoy2012
Posts: 1044
Joined: Wed Sep 26, 2012 5:30 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by killjoy2012 » Sat Mar 21, 2015 11:35 am

I agree with a large portion of the recommendations here, although I'd highlight:

- Make darn sure you understand all firearm and handgun laws for all country, states & localities that you plan to RV through. CA is probably the worst US state to own a handgun in. Very minor infractions to gun laws often have very major consequences regardless of where you are. Handgun laws are especially complex/difficult and are generally more constraining that shotgun/rifle laws. The responsibility is on YOU to understand the laws -- there is no "but, I didn't know!".

- Given that you're going to be driving across the state/country, and given that handgun laws are stricter than shotgun, I would consider going with a shotgun instead. Not only for the sake of laws, but shotguns are going be much better defense from animals (or bad guys) while camping in remote areas. Or if the zombie apocalypse occurs while you're traveling, you can hunt most animals with a shotgun. The same cannot be said about a handgun.

- In the US, and especially among firearm people, pistol = semi-auto, revolver = revolver, handgun = either. You can quote whatever proper English document you want - that is the accepted terminology here. Just as a "clip" and a "mag" are not interchangeable words.

- Revolvers are fairly simple devices - less to go wrong, but less capability too. Pistols provide more capability, but with added complexity and possibly less reliability. I think you can make a good argument for either. I would also ask revolver fans why just about every PD and military service branch use pistols now. Instead of debating that, I would instead recommend you go visit your local gun range 4-6 times, and rent several of the top handguns for 30/60 minutes -- go shoot them and see what you like best. Then make your decision, as I certainly would never buy a handgun that I've never "test drove" myself prior. Go shoot a S&W and Ruger revolver. A Glock, SIG & HK 9mm pistol. Maybe even try a 45 ACP pistol. I would suspect that after shooting those 6, you'll absolutely have a preference towards 1-2.

User avatar
akblizzard
Posts: 141
Joined: Mon May 05, 2014 4:25 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by akblizzard » Sat Mar 21, 2015 12:25 pm

camper wrote:I'm a fan of Ruger revolvers.
Check out the GP100 or the SP101.
Agree. A great pistol for beginners.

Alex Frakt
Founder
Posts: 10853
Joined: Fri Feb 23, 2007 1:06 pm
Location: Chicago
Contact:

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by Alex Frakt » Sat Mar 21, 2015 12:40 pm

killjoy2012 wrote:I agree with a large portion of the recommendations here, although I'd highlight:

- Make darn sure you understand all firearm and handgun laws for all country, states & localities that you plan to RV through. CA is probably the worst US state to own a handgun in. Very minor infractions to gun laws often have very major consequences regardless of where you are. Handgun laws are especially complex/difficult and are generally more constraining that shotgun/rifle laws. The responsibility is on YOU to understand the laws -- there is no "but, I didn't know!".

- Given that you're going to be driving across the state/country, and given that handgun laws are stricter than shotgun, I would consider going with a shotgun instead. Not only for the sake of laws, but shotguns are going be much better defense from animals (or bad guys) while camping in remote areas. Or if the zombie apocalypse occurs while you're traveling, you can hunt most animals with a shotgun. The same cannot be said about a handgun.

- In the US, and especially among firearm people, pistol = semi-auto, revolver = revolver, handgun = either. You can quote whatever proper English document you want - that is the accepted terminology here. Just as a "clip" and a "mag" are not interchangeable words.

- Revolvers are fairly simple devices - less to go wrong, but less capability too. Pistols provide more capability, but with added complexity and possibly less reliability. I think you can make a good argument for either. I would also ask revolver fans why just about every PD and military service branch use pistols now. Instead of debating that, I would instead recommend you go visit your local gun range 4-6 times, and rent several of the top handguns for 30/60 minutes -- go shoot them and see what you like best. Then make your decision, as I certainly would never buy a handgun that I've never "test drove" myself prior. Go shoot a S&W and Ruger revolver. A Glock, SIG & HK 9mm pistol. Maybe even try a 45 ACP pistol. I would suspect that after shooting those 6, you'll absolutely have a preference towards 1-2.
I agree with everything in this post. If you do go with a shotgun, make sure you get training with it as well. There are self-defense shotgun classes and some indoor ranges will allow you to shoot shotguns as well as handguns. BTW, make sure you wear both earplugs and earmuffs at an indoor range, shooting inside is incredibly loud. I suspect far more cases of flinching are due to the noise rather than the recoil.

Also another vote for new shooters not to automatically start with a revolver. This was good advice for the first seven or eight decades decades after the introduction of semi-autos, so it became ingrained among shooters generally. But the modern (Glock-style) semi-auto is simple to operate, more comfortable to shoot for most people (less flash and noise for one thing), and certainly as reliable as a revolver. Fire example of each and make up your own mind.

whomever
Posts: 782
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2012 5:21 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by whomever » Sat Mar 21, 2015 1:11 pm

" But the modern (Glock-style) semi-auto is simple to operate, more comfortable to shoot for most people (less flash and noise for one thing), and certainly as reliable as a revolver. Fire example of each and make up your own mind."

I certainly agree with the last sentence.

On the semi vs. revolver complexity issue, from teaching new shooters I have come to the opinion that there are two kinds of people. Some people can easily track the gun's internal condition - is there a round in the chamber or not - and some can't. I think it's just an innate thing, like being tone deaf or color blind. If you're one of the people who can track that, a Glock or similar is as easy as it gets. But people who don't have that ability have problems - they insert a mag, don't charge the chamber, and wonder why they get a click instead of a bang, or they muff the unload (by cycling the slide, then removing the magazine), etc, etc. My experience is that the people who struggle with semis in those ways have less problems with a revolver.

I'm not saying semi's are exotic rocket science - learning to use one is a heckuva lot simpler than driving a car, for example. I think anyone can learn to use one well. But, IMHE there is a subset of the population that finds semis more challenging than revolvers. I'm not mechanically challenged in that particular way, so I don't really get why that is, but I certainly encounter the phenomenon when teaching people. YMMV, of course!

(pump vs. break action shotguns are a similar thing - most people have no problem understanding a pump, but some people do - while the status of a break action is, like a revolver, obvious by direct visual inspection)

User avatar
Gort
Posts: 451
Joined: Sat Mar 17, 2007 5:07 pm
Location: Idaho

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by Gort » Sat Mar 21, 2015 2:14 pm

Odd discussion for a financial forum.
Last edited by Gort on Sat Mar 21, 2015 3:18 pm, edited 2 times in total.

tim1999
Posts: 3502
Joined: Tue Dec 16, 2008 7:16 am

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by tim1999 » Sat Mar 21, 2015 2:46 pm

LadyGeek wrote:
stev wrote:...I know nothing about guns. I am in CA.
Any recommendations/ comments. Thanks.
Before you do anything, please read the last part of zapluken's post here: Re: Guns for hunting/defense. Then read my follow-up post, 4 down from there.
I missed that post and your response the first time around. I'd recommend that everyone read them. Always treat every gun as if it were loaded, because it might be. It's a good habit to get into.

User avatar
ChicagoMedStudent
Posts: 106
Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2014 4:33 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by ChicagoMedStudent » Sat Mar 21, 2015 4:27 pm

stev wrote:Nothing fancy. But a good brand.
Something to carry in my Motorhome when I travel.
Like a 38 or 40 cal.
A revolver/ double action/ external hammer.... for example.
I know nothing about guns. I am in CA.
Any recommendations/ comments. Thanks.
Not quite to your specifications but IMO the Sig Sauer P220 is a fantastic pistol. I highly recommend it.
Passions are the only orators which always persuade. - François de La Rochefoucauld

User avatar
Petrocelli
Posts: 2774
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 6:29 pm
Location: Fenway Park, between 2nd and 3rd base

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by Petrocelli » Sat Mar 21, 2015 6:24 pm

I don't know a lot about this, but doesn't it depend on who you want to shoot?

FULL DISCLOSURE: My firm litigates against the NRA alot.
Petrocelli (not the real Rico, but just a fan)

jrtexas
Posts: 150
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2015 2:19 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by jrtexas » Sat Mar 21, 2015 6:50 pm

as a retired cop, I never carry anymore, havin a gun on your hip for 30 years just ain't normal.
But my duty weapon was a sig 226, and I still own that and a sig 380. But a Smith and Wesson 357 4 inch
barrel is all you need. You can use 38 rounds. If you have never shot a handgun, stay away from Auto's

ralph124cf
Posts: 2034
Joined: Tue Apr 01, 2014 11:41 am

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by ralph124cf » Sat Mar 21, 2015 6:52 pm

jhfenton wrote:
Professor Emeritus wrote:
Fletch wrote:Pistols are semi-automatics, Revolvers are, well, revolvers but are not actually pistols

sorry NO

Pistol is a noun It is a hand held firearm
Revolving, automatic, semi automatic, horse,wheel-lock, rifled, flintlock, double barreled, machine, navy, Colt, Browning, Lugar etc are all adjectives that can be used to modify the noun "pistol"

Origin
mid 16th century: from obsolete French pistole, from German Pistole, from Czech pišt'ala
Well in Fletch's defense, there is a large part of the American firearms community in which a pistol is defined as a firearm with a single chamber integral to the barrel designed to be held unsupported in the hands. Per this definition, a revolver is not a pistol, as it has multiple chambers, none of which are integral to the barrel. But a pistol need not be semi-automatic. You can have a single-shot pistol or a fully-automatic pistol, just not a "revolver pistol" according to this exacting definition.

I will admit that this definition is not universal, but it is a widespread technical distinction made by those of us who scrupulously use magazines in our pistols rather than "clips."
Just for fun, how would you characterize a muzzle-loading cap and ball pepperbox? Each barrel has its own chamber.

Ralph

User avatar
deanbrew
Posts: 1279
Joined: Wed Jul 21, 2010 12:05 pm
Location: The Keystone State

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by deanbrew » Sat Mar 21, 2015 9:26 pm

Petrocelli wrote:I don't know a lot about this, but doesn't it depend on who you want to shoot
As in. .. race, gender, nationality, shoe size, species, fur thickness? Sorry, I have no idea what you are trying to get at.
"The course of history shows that as the government grows, liberty decreases." Thomas Jefferson

User avatar
Petrocelli
Posts: 2774
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 6:29 pm
Location: Fenway Park, between 2nd and 3rd base

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by Petrocelli » Sat Mar 21, 2015 10:03 pm

deanbrew wrote:
Petrocelli wrote:I don't know a lot about this, but doesn't it depend on who you want to shoot
As in. .. race, gender, nationality, shoe size, species, fur thickness? Sorry, I have no idea what you are trying to get at.
I guess what I'm getting at is the person you intend to shoot someone one who is breaking into your motorhome?

I'd get a shotgun. You won't miss.
Petrocelli (not the real Rico, but just a fan)

User avatar
timboktoo
Posts: 698
Joined: Sun Mar 31, 2013 3:42 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by timboktoo » Sat Mar 21, 2015 11:04 pm

Petrocelli wrote:I'd get a shotgun. You won't miss.
I bought a shotgun first based on advice like this. If I was woken during the night, the theory went that I'd be able to aim much better in a groggy state with a shotgun. And I think that's true. I can't hit much with my Glock even when I'm fully awake, but I can hit anything with my Mossberg. That said, something felt incomplete about the shotgun. I wanted the feel of a handgun instead, even though I knew the aim wouldn't be as good. Comfort mattered a lot to me. The shotgun just didn't feel right. I also liked that I could keep it loaded by my bedside and not even have to get out of bed to use it. The speed with which I could engage someone made me feel much more confident.

Anyway, the reason I say this is that I don't think that a person can say across the board that having a shotgun is better for home defense than having a handgun is. I know it's the common thing to say, and I don't think it's bad advice at all, but I do think that what matters most is having comfort and confidence in the weapon you own.

- Tim

John3754
Posts: 1289
Joined: Tue Mar 19, 2013 8:56 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by John3754 » Sat Mar 21, 2015 11:09 pm

Petrocelli wrote:I'd get a shotgun. You won't miss.
This is a myth, at home defense ranges the spread of a shotgun is not that much, and shotguns can be more difficult for a novice to handle.

User avatar
deanbrew
Posts: 1279
Joined: Wed Jul 21, 2010 12:05 pm
Location: The Keystone State

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by deanbrew » Sun Mar 22, 2015 7:08 am

Petrocelli wrote:
I guess what I'm getting at is the person you intend to shoot someone one who is breaking into your motorhome?

I'd get a shotgun. You won't miss.
This is the oft-repeated untruth I referenced previously. Absolutely untrue. The shot spread at 10 feet, out of a traditional shotgun, is negligible, meaning all of the pellets plus the wadding will make one single hole. The same is pretty much true at 20 feet. These distances are pretty large in an RV, or even a house. You can't simply point a shotgun in a general direction and let the magical shot pellets find their target.

The other problem with a shotgun in a house, and even more so in an RV, is how cumbersome it is. If you don't have a shotgun, take a broom and try moving about your house or RV, deploying the "muzzle" at pretend targets while taking cover. It's simply too long and will bump into walls, doorways, cabinets, furniture, etc. Nope, I am not a proponent of a shotgun in a house for self defense. Even less so in an RV. A handgun is much handier.

And if you have ever been in an RV, where would you safely store a shotgun? There are small handgun safes made specifically for this purpose, which don't take up too much room.

The aforementioned Judge or Governor are reasonable choices, however, being in effect handgun shotguns with five or six shots. You will get a quick pattern spread out of a short handgun barrel.
"The course of history shows that as the government grows, liberty decreases." Thomas Jefferson

SurferLife
Posts: 268
Joined: Sun Jun 15, 2014 1:57 am

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by SurferLife » Sun Mar 22, 2015 7:28 am

I always recommend to folks that they go to a gun range and rent/shoot different pistols to see how they feel. They all feel quite different from one another and some fit your hand well while others don't. Then, let the gun choose you. I've known many gun ranges that will deduct the price of either the rental or range time from the cost of a gun if you buy from them (can't remember which). Like others have mentioned, the price of ammo can be a factor for price and for availability. One of my guns is a .380 and finding ammo for that is pretty much impossible. However, this isn't a huge factor if you don't plan to shoot very often.

User avatar
Just sayin...
Posts: 205
Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 10:12 am

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by Just sayin... » Sun Mar 22, 2015 9:28 am

There are several "correct" answers to your question. When you have narrowed the field a bit, the final best choice comes down to you - what do you feel most comfortable with? Once you have made your decision, I strongly recommend you start with some expert coaching on basics (safety, operation, maintenance), then invest time and money on putting 500 to 1,000 rounds or so downrange and getting to know how your particular firearm works (or doesn't). I personally don't consider a pistol usable for home/personal protection unless and until I've put a thousand trouble-free rounds through it (no stovepipes, no fail to fire, no nothing). I've seen a few examples of highly respected firearms that were just plain bad (P220, G17, Shield, etc.)

TN_Boy
Posts: 535
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2009 12:51 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by TN_Boy » Sun Mar 22, 2015 9:50 am

John3754 wrote:The OP has received a lot of good advice regarding getting training and learning the local laws. Here's my $0.02 on this subject...the conventional wisdom is that new shooters should always start on revolvers, but I have found this to not be universally true. I have experience helping multiple new shooters get started and on more than one occasion they've picked up revolvers and not only hated shooting them, but also shot poorly with them. Put a semiauto in that same persons hands though and they love it and shoot much better. It's really matter of personal preference, but it's my experience that the long heavy trigger pull of a double action revolver is a deterrent for many people (both new and experienced), and I think it's a good idea to try both platforms before drawing a conclusion, rather than just following convention.
I'm glad somebody else made this point. I believe many, in fact, almost *everybody* will find a semi-auto easier to shoot well. The long heavy double-action trigger and generally less hand filling grip of a revolver make a big (negative) difference. I think a semi-auto has a better balance as well. I've read -- though it's been a while -- that when police departments began the huge transition to semi-autos back in the 80s that qualification scores generally went up, and I can believe it.

It's a separate question how much safer/easier a revolver is to manage. Semi-autos are not really all that complicated.

I would note, although OP didn't actually ask, that the only situation in which a firearm in the RV is useful is if you are there and someone attempts to break in. I think it much more likely they will break in when you are not there. And since we are not talking conceal carry permits, one obviously cannot take the firearm around with you for security.

robert88
Posts: 366
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2014 6:27 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by robert88 » Sun Mar 22, 2015 4:19 pm

Ged wrote:Training and care is very important. Owning a firearm is a big responsibility. If you don't believe me look up the term 'Glock Leg".

Plaxico Burress found out all about this. He was lucky to hit only his leg sticking that thing into his waistband. He could have materially affected his ability to father children.
That's a special kind of stupidity to carry a handgun with no safety without a holster.

Dude2
Posts: 739
Joined: Fri Jun 08, 2007 3:40 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by Dude2 » Sun Mar 22, 2015 8:10 pm

Whatever you buy, just be responsible. This is a tool. It causes an explosion that ejects lead with tremendous force. Like any tool, safety has to be considered, including the storage of the gun and the ammunition and not permitting access. There are different tools for different applications. I see it as short range (hand gun), medium range (shotgun), long range (long gun).

Much is going to depend on the amount of money you are willing to spend. Gun shop employees can be very helpful in that regard. Some cheaper options to consider would be Ruger for an automatic and Taurus for a revolver. I have coveted a Glock for decades and finally bought one last year (Glock-19) in the over $500 range.

In terms of a specific handgun caliber, you probably will want to try before you buy. I do not like a 45 caliber Glock. I find it too light and small for that much energy. A Colt 1911 is, in my opinion, the best 45 caliber handgun (but boy do they jam). However, a Glock 9-millimeter is really something you have to experience for yourself, like a Craftsman hammer, it just fits.

User avatar
StormShadow
Posts: 597
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2012 6:20 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by StormShadow » Sun Mar 22, 2015 10:54 pm

+1 for the S&W or Ruger revolver.

Just go to a range and rent a few. I personally like Glock and Sig Sauer, but if you're not used to shooting then a semi-auto may not be ideal as a first (only?) handgun to get.

Agree with others that you should take a shooting/safety course. Know the four rules by heart before you pick up any handgun.

User avatar
OldOne
Posts: 154
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2011 7:02 pm
Location: Texas

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by OldOne » Sun Mar 22, 2015 11:14 pm

Revolver

Valuethinker
Posts: 36337
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 11:07 am

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by Valuethinker » Mon Mar 23, 2015 9:27 am

John3754 wrote:The OP has received a lot of good advice regarding getting training and learning the local laws. Here's my $0.02 on this subject...the conventional wisdom is that new shooters should always start on revolvers, but I have found this to not be universally true. I have experience helping multiple new shooters get started and on more than one occasion they've picked up revolvers and not only hated shooting them, but also shot poorly with them. Put a semiauto in that same persons hands though and they love it and shoot much better. It's really matter of personal preference, but it's my experience that the long heavy trigger pull of a double action revolver is a deterrent for many people (both new and experienced), and I think it's a good idea to try both platforms before drawing a conclusion, rather than just following convention.
I can concurr about the trigger pressure of a revolver. In my limited experience, it throws your aim off-- the heavy squeeze.

Semi automatic pistols now seem so reliable that the advantages of a revolver are reduced.

Valuethinker
Posts: 36337
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 11:07 am

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by Valuethinker » Mon Mar 23, 2015 9:31 am

DSInvestor wrote:If your travels take you into Canada, do your homework. Here's a page from the US Embassy in Canada on Bringing Weapons into Canada:
http://canada.usembassy.gov/traveling_t ... anada.html

Here's a link to a page at Canada Border Services Agency:
http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications ... 4-eng.html

There is a tv show called Border Security that follows Canadian border agents as they process travelers in secondary screening entering Canada. Make sure you do your research and declare all items.
This is very good advice. Get a black mark in their computer and that will be hassle for the rest of your life. Plus (I don't know) I imagine Canada Customs and Immigration shares data with DHS.

12thman
Posts: 46
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 6:34 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by 12thman » Mon Mar 23, 2015 11:34 am

First off, don't go cheap! If you are buying this for self defense then you are buying this with the intent that your LIFE WILL DEPEND on this weapon. I'm not saying to go buy the most expensive thing out there but don't buy some thing over something else because ammunition is cheaper.

Secondly, as others have stated, shotguns are not practical. Its a common misconception that you cant miss. You can, in fact, easily miss because the shot needs distance to spread out which you do not have in a RV (or house for that matter). Also, they are also too large and cumbersome. A shot from my pistol at someone is just as intimidating as a shot from a shotgun. Also you can use your cell phone to call police while using your pistol at the same time.

Third, a pistol is just as reliable in this situation as a revolver. Sure if you drop your pistol in mud and then leave it like that under your pillow it may not shoot, but a clean pistol left in your RV will perform just fine if the time arises.

Fourth, choose pistol over revolver because of the ammunition capacity and reload times. If you have to shoot at someone, you will be nervous and will miss. Therefore, give yourself a greater advantage by having more bullets and spend less time reloading.

Buy a weapon that is well made (sig sauer, S&W, Glock), that fits your hand well, and has a comfortable recoil.

goblue100
Posts: 695
Joined: Sun Dec 01, 2013 10:31 am

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by goblue100 » Mon Mar 23, 2015 2:52 pm

jonbois wrote:I know you asked about a pistol A 12 gauge shotgun pump action defender is, in my opinion, the best home defense weapon especially for the unskilled individual. You'll have to try real hard to miss close range and it intimidates most people.
JB
I agree with the shotgun for an unskilled person at close range. You still have to practice using it, though. Depending on your size, a .410 might be a good choice.
"The 12 gauge is king, but the 20 gauge and .410 are good too. In fact the little .410 is powerful as a 357 magnum revolver! The .410 is a good choice for women as the recoil is light and the shells are easy to cycle.
As for 12 gauge home defense ammo, anything between #4 and #00 buck shot will work fine. The #4 buck shot would be like getting hit in the chest 20 times by an 22 rifle! At 15 feet the pattern will be about 4" wide from an 20 inch barrel. The #6 shot game bird loads should be the minimum size for use indoors. "

http://www.houseguns.com/shotguns.html
Can't take it with you when you're gone | But I want enough to get there on - Rollin with the flow - Jerry Hayes

logicon
Posts: 72
Joined: Tue Mar 10, 2015 8:18 pm

Re: Whats a good Pistol to buy?

Post by logicon » Mon Mar 23, 2015 3:17 pm

DFrank wrote:You might ask this question over on http://www.calguns.net - you'll find many knowledgeable people over there that will be able to help you.
+1 Calguns.net is the place for all information of gun rights/laws/ownership in California.

Post Reply