Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret it?

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ThankYouJack
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Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret it?

Post by ThankYouJack » Tue Mar 03, 2015 2:04 pm

I've always loved getting out on the water and wake boarding, skiing, kneeboarding, tubing, air chair or just riding along and have thought about getting a boat or wave runner or jet ski for a few years. My car has a towing capacity of 2,700 lbs so assuming I don't want to buy an additional car, it seems like that limits my options to a waverunner or jet ski. I've never been on a jet ski, but they seem more fun than a waverunner -- however, I'm not sure if you can tow from a jet ski.

If I don't buy something, I have a few options: There is a rental shop at the lake by me and they rent boats ($500 full day) and wave runners ($250 / 3 hrs) but they have a no towing policy. I could also take wake board lessons for about $120 / hour. My neighbor has a boat and wave runner but both are older and he usually just takes his family out on them a few times a year.

I know the saying goes: the best two days of owning a boat are the day you buy and the day you sell. However, I know that isn't the case for everyone. If you've owned a power boat or waverunner, was it worth it?


Here's a funny "money doesn't buy happiness" skit by Daniel Tosh - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_RoLdkgjKhs

EDIT: I've pretty much ruled out wave runners (and probably jet skis) since I read that they aren't as good for towing. But I'm going to do some research on a small, light ~15' boat that could tow a wakeboarder.
Last edited by ThankYouJack on Tue Mar 03, 2015 4:33 pm, edited 2 times in total.

PowDay
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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret

Post by PowDay » Tue Mar 03, 2015 2:30 pm

First questions is where do you live, owning a boat in Florida is very different than owning a boat in New England.

I find wave runners to be a blast, but all I need is a $200 rental every two years, and I've had my fill. Unless you have a group to go out with, they seem like a lot of money for a solo toy.

Have you considered making friends with someone who has a boat :happy

Boats day
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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret

Post by Boats day » Tue Mar 03, 2015 2:32 pm

I owned both boats and a jet ski. Never regretted it.
I always bot used and had a marine mechanic checkout the boat.
Most jet skis can easily tow a skier or wake boarder.

Rent one before buying to make sure it's what you want.

Good luck

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ThankYouJack
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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret

Post by ThankYouJack » Tue Mar 03, 2015 2:52 pm

PowDay wrote:First questions is where do you live, owning a boat in Florida is very different than owning a boat in New England.

I find wave runners to be a blast, but all I need is a $200 rental every two years, and I've had my fill. Unless you have a group to go out with, they seem like a lot of money for a solo toy.

Have you considered making friends with someone who has a boat :happy
The average high is in the 70's or 80's, 7 months out of the year where I live. So boating season is longer here than in New England, but not as long as FL.

In the past I've made friends who own boats, trucks, pools, etc :) I figure at some point, I'm due to pay it forward and let friends have fun on a bit more of my dime.
Boats day wrote:I owned both boats and a jet ski. Never regretted it.
I always bot used and had a marine mechanic checkout the boat.
Most jet skis can easily tow a skier or wake boarder.

Rent one before buying to make sure it's what you want.

Good luck
Thanks, that makes sense. I'll look for a place to rent jet skis. They seem much more rare than waverunners, but I'm sure I can find a rental shop if I look far enough. I haven't really started looking yet, but I'm thinking something a couple years old could make sense and will ask around and search on Yelp for a good marine mechanic.

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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret

Post by noyopacific » Tue Mar 03, 2015 3:05 pm

I used to own a 16' aluminum (Starcraft) bow rider with 85hp outboard. It was light and easy to tow with most cars. Pulling the boat out of the water with a small car on a steep launching ramp could be a challenge because it requires both power and traction. For power to weight performance as well as reliability and maintenance considerations, I would only consider outboard power. (In my experience, engines that have been modified for marine use and used seasonally can be expensive maintenance nightmares.) Top speed of our boat was 38 mph and it had plenty of power to pull up big guys on a single ski. It was big enough to carry a small crowd when necessary. Owing a boat gives you more freedom of when and where you can use it but you would be burdened with maintenance, storage and risk of damage, theft and the other liabilities of ownership 24/7/365. Depending on how much you use it a rental can be much more economical.
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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret

Post by johnubc » Tue Mar 03, 2015 3:06 pm

I have owned all and currently have a boat and wave runner.

No towing from a jet ski. Fun, harder to master. Not for the novice.

Wave runner - Lots of fun as a group and just to tour around the lake. Can be fun in short spurts of wave jumping and just goofing off. Shorter duration - more fun. Less fun as a solo.

Ski boat - great fun if people are skiing, tubing, wake boarding, etc. Good all around.

Pontoon - great all around amateur skiing, tubing and wake boarding. Party barge - can get a lot of people on it 2-3 families. Comfortable seating. Easy on and off.

We use the boat very often. Is a boatel or wet slip an option?

Deciding -
How often do you think you will really use it (them)?
Safety license - for guests?
Cost? They are not cheap.
Cost to entertain your many guests who think it runs on water.

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ThankYouJack
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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret

Post by ThankYouJack » Tue Mar 03, 2015 3:27 pm

noyopacific wrote:I used to own a 16' aluminum (Starcraft) bow rider with 85hp outboard. It was light and easy to tow with most cars. Pulling the boat out of the water with a small car on a steep launching ramp could be a challenge because it requires both power and traction. For power to weight performance as well as reliability and maintenance considerations, I would only consider outboard power. (In my experience, engines that have been modified for marine use and used seasonally can be expensive maintenance nightmares.) Top speed of our boat was 38 mph and it had plenty of power to pull up big guys on a single ski. It was big enough to carry a small crowd when necessary. Owing a boat gives you more freedom of when and where you can use it but you would be burdened with maintenance, storage and risk of damage, theft and the other liabilities of ownership 24/7/365. Depending on how much you use it a rental can be much more economical.
Do you know what the weight was of your boat loaded? I have a Subaru Outback (a new one with the X-mode traction feature) and live about 10 minutes from the boat ramp. It isn't flat though

johnubc wrote:I have owned all and currently have a boat and wave runner.

No towing from a jet ski. Fun, harder to master. Not for the novice.

Wave runner - Lots of fun as a group and just to tour around the lake. Can be fun in short spurts of wave jumping and just goofing off. Shorter duration - more fun. Less fun as a solo.

Ski boat - great fun if people are skiing, tubing, wake boarding, etc. Good all around.

Pontoon - great all around amateur skiing, tubing and wake boarding. Party barge - can get a lot of people on it 2-3 families. Comfortable seating. Easy on and off.

We use the boat very often. Is a boatel or wet slip an option?

Deciding -
How often do you think you will really use it (them)?
Safety license - for guests?
Cost? They are not cheap.
Cost to entertain your many guests who think it runs on water.
Thanks for the feedback. It does seem like jet skis aren't good for towing wake boarders which makes sense when you consider the physics - http://www.wakeworld.com/MB/Discus/mess ... 1108950100

The marina is sold out of wet slips.
I think I'd use it once a week for ~6 months a year.
I haven't looked into safety license yet and haven't put a lot of thought into what I'd want to get. I'd probably start small, basic and used if I got a boat.

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dbCooperAir
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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret

Post by dbCooperAir » Tue Mar 03, 2015 4:04 pm

We have a ton of lakes around us, lots of options to choose from. My take on most the PWC (personal water craft) is it gets a tad boring, they are fun in a group and or messing around otherwise you are stuck site seeing the same thing over and over unless you load up and switch lakes. I enjoy ATV's and Snowmobiles more than PWC's. its the only way to see most of our state.

I'm getting old however and just prefer to fish on the lakes now. A cold beer, a tin of worms and an old aluminum fishing boat is about as close to heaven as I can get.

Rent a couple of PWC's, then think about it for week if you want to buy one. I have not looked for awhile but new PWC's did not hold their value very well.
Neither a wise man nor a brave man lies down on the tracks of history to wait for the train of the future to run over him. | -Dwight D. Eisenhower-

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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret

Post by ddurrett896 » Tue Mar 03, 2015 4:12 pm

One of the best buys I've ever made.

1996 Malibu Wakesetter
Book was $15,000 at the time - I got it for $7,000 after some TOUGH negotiating. Put a new battery in it and used it for a year - sold it for $12,500!

Everyone says boat stands for Bust Off Another Thousand and there is some truth to that! I like boats, but if I ever buy one again it's going to have to be another steal from someone desperate to get rid of. There is just too much maintenance/storage associated with it!

Wave Runners = boring. It's a solo thing and could be fun if every one of your friends have one, but that's not likely. You're better off buying a boat and taking all your friends out (they normally buy the fuel)

WL2034
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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret

Post by WL2034 » Tue Mar 03, 2015 4:27 pm

I opened this thread for the express purpose to post a link to that Daniel Tosh skit. Well played, OP. I've never owned one, but I've never been sad while I was on one, either!

VPP
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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret

Post by VPP » Tue Mar 03, 2015 4:33 pm

Best times of my life were at the lake. Have an old 28ft cruiser now that I am working on. No regrets but be realistic about the total cost!

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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret

Post by White Coat Investor » Tue Mar 03, 2015 4:36 pm

First of all, buying a boat is almost always a terrible financial decision. This is in no way, shape, or form an investment. It's not a consumption item that may keep up with inflation like a house or vacation home. It's just a massive, huge money pit. So make darn sure you can afford this hobby before getting into it. Purchase price, taxes, registration, insurance, gas, maintenance, repairs, accessories, winterizing etc all adds up. This is by far my most expensive hobby and I have a bunch that many consider expensive-skiing, climbing, traveling, ice hockey etc.

Second, get a starter boat. I bought one in 2010 for $6K (02, 17 foot, 135 hp). It pulls wakeboarders, skiers, big tubes, and hauled us all over Lake Powell camping. I'll be selling it shortly, not because it isn't fun or we didn't like it, but because we enjoyed it so much that we wanted something bigger and better and have ordered a boat that is more than an order of magnitude more expensive. 2015, 23 foot, 410 hp fancy wake boat. It's expensive but we can afford it (paying cash) and the ongoing costs and think it will actually make our life happier. But we got an awful lot of bang for our buck out of that $6K boat (which I can probably sell for $5-6K according to blue book.) I would not buy a ski boat with less than 135 hp. I have OFTEN wished I had more power and very rarely feel like I have enough. I'm also at altitude and like to take people with me when I go.

Third, a big waverunner certainly can pull a wakeboarder. But you better not want to become a very advanced wakeboarder as the wake my rinky-dink 17 footer puts out will make the waverunner wake really look bad. Wakeboarding (and especially surfing) is all about creating the boat so it makes this big huge wake you can jump off of. The hull shape, the horsepower, the gearing, fancy wave-shaping tools, and ballast (this boat I'm getting pumps 3-4000 lbs of water INTO the boat in 4 minutes in order to make a bigger wake.)

Fourth, waverunners are relatively easy to rent. Generic boats are relatively easy (but surprisingly expensive) to rent. But you pretty much can't rent a nice wakeboat. Buy it or make friends. You certainly don't want to be renting 24 times a year.

Fifth, you're going to want a bigger car/SUV/truck to pull this thing unless you're only going a few miles and its very flat. Remember that the boat ramp IS NOT flat. I think it's probably possible to get a little boat under 2700 lbs even with the trailer, but it's going to be close. I can't remember what our small boat/trailer weighs, but I know the big one is over 4000 lbs dry without any fuel or stuff in it.

Good luck! We obviously enjoy it or wouldn't be spending so much to continue/upgrade it.
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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret

Post by Wellfleet » Tue Mar 03, 2015 4:46 pm

My father and I are boaters and have owned boats for 17 years. All 4 were either found in someone's yard in bad or good condition locally. We came close but never bit on making a really bad decision. Free was the cheapest and $3000 was the most expensive. This is why I just learned about Bogleheads a year ago.

We have never regretted them and its become "our thing" to get us through the winter.

I would recommend renting for a season but it sounds like the local rental won't let you tow. Bummer. Are there nearby boatyards that you could rent for a month from? Like many things there are many associated costs that can be large or small depending on how you approach. If you want to show up June first with a boat fueled and ready to drive it will be more expensive than doing those tasks yourself.

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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret

Post by WL2034 » Tue Mar 03, 2015 4:51 pm

EmergDoc wrote:The hull shape, the horsepower, the gearing, fancy wave-shaping tools, and ballast (this boat I'm getting pumps 3-4000 lbs of water INTO the boat in 4 minutes in order to make a bigger wake.) ... Buy it or make friends.
Are you accepting friend requests? :mrgreen:

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ThankYouJack
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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret

Post by ThankYouJack » Tue Mar 03, 2015 6:27 pm

EmergDoc wrote:First of all, buying a boat is almost always a terrible financial decision. This is in no way, shape, or form an investment. It's not a consumption item that may keep up with inflation like a house or vacation home. It's just a massive, huge money pit. So make darn sure you can afford this hobby before getting into it. Purchase price, taxes, registration, insurance, gas, maintenance, repairs, accessories, winterizing etc all adds up. This is by far my most expensive hobby and I have a bunch that many consider expensive-skiing, climbing, traveling, ice hockey etc.

Second, get a starter boat. I bought one in 2010 for $6K (02, 17 foot, 135 hp). It pulls wakeboarders, skiers, big tubes, and hauled us all over Lake Powell camping. I'll be selling it shortly, not because it isn't fun or we didn't like it, but because we enjoyed it so much that we wanted something bigger and better and have ordered a boat that is more than an order of magnitude more expensive. 2015, 23 foot, 410 hp fancy wake boat. It's expensive but we can afford it (paying cash) and the ongoing costs and think it will actually make our life happier. But we got an awful lot of bang for our buck out of that $6K boat (which I can probably sell for $5-6K according to blue book.) I would not buy a ski boat with less than 135 hp. I have OFTEN wished I had more power and very rarely feel like I have enough. I'm also at altitude and like to take people with me when I go.
Thanks for the info. I'm usually a fan of getting starter things (bikes, DSLRs, SUPs) and then working my way up.

What would you estimate the annual and per use costs are for your boat? It won't set my retirement goals back, but I think I have the whole "money pit" thing stuck in my head.

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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret

Post by White Coat Investor » Tue Mar 03, 2015 7:11 pm

I'm scared to add it up. :)

Although I have over 30 boat days planned this year, more typical for us is 10-15 days a year. Short season here. So when you divide up the costs, it's really about how much you use it. If you're going to put 200 hours on that sucker, the per use cost will be mostly gas. If you're going to put 20 hours on it, it'll be mostly depreciation/maintenance/insurance costs.

Our insurance is something like $120 a year, it holds 30 gallons. I'll burn several hundred dollars worth of gas on a 4-5 day trip to Lake Powell, easily the largest expense of the trip. I do the winterizing myself for less than $100 in parts, oil etc. But I had to buy some specialized tools to do that. A typical charge is $200 a year for that. I replaced the carpet. It was ridiculously expensive. I don't remember exactly how much, but it was $1000 or even more for less than 100 square feet. Some tubes are $3-400. You can spend $600 on a surfboard or wakeboard (or $20 from the classifieds). There are definitely ways to keep costs down. A prop repair around here is $75. A new prop was $150. The prop going on the new boat is $4-600. Can't wait to hit a rock with that one. That's a once a year event for me given how I use the boat (Lake Powell is a different elevation on every trip, so the rocks are never in the same place and the water is definitely NOT clear with all the sand in it.) Life preservers, starters, lightbulbs, upholstery repair etc. I paid $100 this year to do the bearings on the boat trailer. I'm paranoid about bearings though as I trailer a long way across the desert. That was the first time I'd had them looked at in 3 years since I replaced them myself (although I changed the grease 1-2 times a year). They looked fine and were just repacked.

I hope that gives you some idea. Just know that pouring money into the boat is part of the gig. I knew that going in, so was never really surprised. As long as you do too, it won't be a big deal. If buying and operating this isn't going to set back your retirement, then go for it. I just knew I would regret not buying a nicer boat if I were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer at 55, so I bought it. Trying to live life with no regrets, finding balance between saving and spending. I talked more about it in this post if you're really interested: http://whitecoatinvestor.com/loosening- ... gs-part-2/
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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret

Post by 6miths » Tue Mar 03, 2015 8:53 pm

We had the Wake version of the SeaDoo. Bought 3rd hand when it was 4 years old and had it for 7 years before 'selling' it to my neighbour at the cottage. I say 'selling' it because I haven't seen any money yet. So now I don't have one and he has 2 which is good because I can use both of them anytime and he'll do all the maintenance (which he can do himself as he is a mechanic by training). I don't really feel the need for speed and much prefer our Hobie Cat but the kids have loved it and have all learned to board and ski. It was an affordable indulgence but at no point did I want any more and am happy for my wonderful neighbour to be taking over responsibility for it.
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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret

Post by texasdiver » Tue Mar 03, 2015 9:50 pm

Owned half a dozen boats over the years. Never regretted any of them. Some things I have learned.

1. For me I much prefer a trailered boat to one in a slip and I have owned both. Can be a major pain to load up a boat in a slip every weekend when you have to lug everything down to the boat by wheelbarrow or cart and then back in the other direction at the end of the day. Amazing how much gear a family can take boating. Then you have to go down to the marina every time you want to work on the boat. Plus, you are pretty much stuck going to all the same places that are close to the marina. If you have the space to park a boat at your house I find that preferable. You can load up the boat in your driveway and clean it up in your driveway at the end of the day. Plus it is right there where all your tools are, electricity, lights, etc. for when you want to work on it. And then you have the option of any boat ramp you want to explore for as far as you want to drive.

2. New prices are insane. Thousands of boats get bought by people who can't afford them or bought them on impulse and aren't using them so figure out what you are looking for and spend time on Craigslist and the other boat marketplace sites. There are ways to search multiple craigslist sites all at once so you can search a whole state, for example. Boats depreciate faster than cars I think so buy a nice fairly new used boat and be happy. Spend way less than your budget to start because you will soon reach your budget on accessories and stuff you didn't think you needed or didn't know you needed.

3. Learn outboard motor repair. If you don't know anything, take a class at your local community college or something. Even if you don't plan to do your own maintenance, there will be a day some day where you are stuck out someplace remote and are having engine trouble.

4. Boats are total fuel hogs. The average modest ski boat gets about the same MPG as the giant big rig trucks that clog our highways. Another reason to have a boat on a trailer because you can fuel up with cheap gas station gas rather than expensive marina gas.

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ThankYouJack
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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret

Post by ThankYouJack » Tue Mar 03, 2015 11:33 pm

EmergDoc wrote:
I hope that gives you some idea. Just know that pouring money into the boat is part of the gig. I knew that going in, so was never really surprised. As long as you do too, it won't be a big deal. If buying and operating this isn't going to set back your retirement, then go for it. I just knew I would regret not buying a nicer boat if I were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer at 55, so I bought it. Trying to live life with no regrets, finding balance between saving and spending. I talked more about it in this post if you're really interested: http://whitecoatinvestor.com/loosening- ... gs-part-2/
Great blog post. I've decided to "loosen the strings" and make time for more outdoor activities and adventures. Your pancreatic cancer is my bad back -- not being able to go on all day mountain bike, snowboard, wakeboard trips. It is tricky though deciding how much to loosen the strings and my wife may be a bit more Mr Money Mustache style where wants to hit an FI number ASAP. She's not a huge fan of boats too so it could be a tough sell, however if I'm 100% set on getting one, I'm sure she'll agree that it's a good decision. I may just browse the classifieds casually for now and wait at least one season -- to research and figure out exactly what I want and how much all the running costs will be. Maybe I'll pay $1,000-$2,000 this year on wakeboard school, cable wake park (doesn't seem nearly as fun but a lot cheaper) and giving money for gas plus some extra to go out on friend's boats.

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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret

Post by North » Wed Mar 04, 2015 9:24 am

I owned a Malibu Response LXi - 340hp tournament inboard ski boat w/ tower. I bought new and enjoyed it very well for 4 years. Sold it for $1,000 less than I paid for it. The ONLY reason I was able to do this was the unbelievably low price I bought it for (like 60% of MSRP.)

We had some of the best times of our lives on that boat. Did a ton of slalom course skiing, wakeboarding, wake surfing, etc. I look back very fondly on those times.

Couple of observations:
1) Trailering sucks
2) Be mechanically inclined - save a ton of money by doing maintenance yourself (it's not hard)
3) if you are serious about skiing and boarding, you will not be happy without an inboard boat (or v-drive inboard)
4) get PerfectPass - cruise control makes anyone a great driver and you will be happy skiing
5) get heaters, hot shower and seat heaters - this will extend your season by at least 2 months
6) skip the stereo - I went with a high end stereo with tower speakers, etc and hardly ever used it to it's potential
7) jetskis suck - just say no

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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret it?

Post by Bajanana » Mon Jul 16, 2018 9:20 pm

My question is for the person who started this thread. What did you get? If a boat, what size and how did your outback do putting it in and out? I have a subaru baja and am wondering if I can put a 19' boat in and out with it. I'm also less than 10 mins from the ramp. Am not worried about the actual tow there, just about getting it in and out on the ramp. Appreciate everyone's input. The owner's manual says max load of 2400lbs. Boat and trailer would be just under. What do you think?

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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret it?

Post by ddurrett896 » Tue Jul 17, 2018 6:53 am

Double Post
Last edited by ddurrett896 on Tue Jul 17, 2018 9:33 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret it?

Post by smitcat » Tue Jul 17, 2018 9:00 am

Bajanana wrote:
Mon Jul 16, 2018 9:20 pm
My question is for the person who started this thread. What did you get? If a boat, what size and how did your outback do putting it in and out? I have a subaru baja and am wondering if I can put a 19' boat in and out with it. I'm also less than 10 mins from the ramp. Am not worried about the actual tow there, just about getting it in and out on the ramp. Appreciate everyone's input. The owner's manual says max load of 2400lbs. Boat and trailer would be just under. What do you think?
I would revisit the boat and trailer weight when loaded with fuel and 'stuff' you will put into it headed for the ramp.
In every case our trailered boats were much heavier in real life usage when the actual weights and trailer were weighed at the weigh station.
As example only - some of the trailers I have towed weighed more than that 2400 #s by themselves when empty. What the catalog says is not typically a fully fitted rig with all the extra items.
If the ramp is very kindly (good slope, clean, not slick, no sudden drop off, etc) you may get away with launching and retrieving the boat OK but trailering above the limit can make for some real problems with Law enforcement and/or you insurance in some areas in some cases.
Additionally - look into the depth that your tow car may have to be immersed both at high and low tides based upon the exact trailer and tow vehicle as this is a factor where we are.
Good luck

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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret it?

Post by HomerJ » Tue Jul 17, 2018 9:19 am

We own a tri-toon 26' boat and a waverunner. We can tube people from either. Take a sunset cruise every night we're at the lake. If it's just the wife and I, we take the waverunner (it's a 3-seater, so easily fits 2 people). If we have more family down, we take the boat out.

We have them on a lift in our own slip at the lake year-round.

Disadvantage is we always go to the same lake (but it's a very big lake, and we live right where it splits in 3 directions, so we have multiple favorite coves to visit).

Advantage is we don't have to haul them anywhere. This is a HUGE advantage. I don't think I would want to own either if I had to haul them around on a trailer every time I wanted to get on the water. I'd just rent instead.

We've made many wonderful family memories at the lake. I hope to live there in the summer during retirement. Good way to get the grandchildren to WANT to visit. :)
The J stands for Jay

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Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret it?

Post by ddurrett896 » Tue Jul 17, 2018 9:35 am

Bajanana wrote:
Mon Jul 16, 2018 9:20 pm
just about getting it in and out on the ramp.
I'd bet your trunk will be in the water.
Last edited by ddurrett896 on Tue Jul 17, 2018 11:29 am, edited 1 time in total.

Topic Author
ThankYouJack
Posts: 3100
Joined: Wed Oct 08, 2014 7:27 pm

Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret it?

Post by ThankYouJack » Tue Jul 17, 2018 9:52 am

Bajanana wrote:
Mon Jul 16, 2018 9:20 pm
My question is for the person who started this thread. What did you get? If a boat, what size and how did your outback do putting it in and out? I have a subaru baja and am wondering if I can put a 19' boat in and out with it. I'm also less than 10 mins from the ramp. Am not worried about the actual tow there, just about getting it in and out on the ramp. Appreciate everyone's input. The owner's manual says max load of 2400lbs. Boat and trailer would be just under. What do you think?
I got a used sit down Waverunner and also a stand up one. Some things have broken but both were definitely worth it for me.

After looking into towing, I would want a bigger vehicle - probably 4,000 lb towing capacity or more to tow a 19' boat. So I'm holding off on the boat for now and will just rent when desired

ACA
Posts: 65
Joined: Wed Nov 29, 2017 7:51 am

Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret it?

Post by ACA » Tue Jul 17, 2018 9:55 am

We are boat people. They are great memory makers with family and friends. Expensive? That’s subjective. But we enjoy every moment of boat ownership.

SundayMorning
Posts: 35
Joined: Tue Jul 11, 2017 6:04 pm

Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret it?

Post by SundayMorning » Tue Jul 17, 2018 10:20 am

I regret the Sea-Doo I bought for $7,000 in 1992 and destroyed by jumping waves. Sold it three years later for $2,000; back to the place where I originally bought it since I was moving out of state on short notice for a job. Was told after the fact, I should not use Sea-Doo's or Wave Runners in the ocean. Apparently my engine mounts were broken and the engine was flopping around, among other things. :shock: I did pull knee boarders and skiers behind the Jet Ski. Should not have been jumping 10 foot waves..

Lessons learned from my misguided youth; boy was I irresponsible. However, there are still some great memories from those times. I did get a lot of hours on it with friends before it croaked, stories we still talk about. Likely broke even on owning vs. renting. On rentals, could never have been so reckless.

Got a call about 5 years after selling that Sea-Doo; dealership part owner asking when I was going to pick up my "boat" from the service dept. I replied that I sold it back to his partner 5 years ago - "it's still yours!" :oops:

During that time, I also had a motorcycle. Sold it after 4 years for within $100.00 of what I originally paid for it. Got more enjoyment out of the bike.

On a positive note, I do not feel the urge to buy a Corvette in my middle age. Surviving my 20's benefits me in that regard, my investment accounts are my sports cars and toys now... :beer

D Newton
Posts: 141
Joined: Wed Feb 21, 2007 12:29 pm
Location: Down by the sea...

Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret it?

Post by D Newton » Tue Jul 17, 2018 5:58 pm

New boat owners here. Bought new...new is nice. No regrets.
62 yrs old ... I didn’t want to spend too much time repairing.
As others said, boating is not an investment.
Pay cash for your toys, and have fun.
Regards, | Doug

Silver Bullet
Posts: 148
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2017 1:18 am

Re: Who has owned a ski boat or waverunner & did you regret it?

Post by Silver Bullet » Fri Jul 20, 2018 12:15 am

We have two Yamaha Waverunners and LOVE them. Wife and I are in our mid-50's and these are a blast to spend an afternoon on. I have equipped one with a cooler rack and rod holders. We'll fill the cooler with beer, water and snacks and head off exploring creeks and beaches. If she's not around, I'll grab a couple of rods, some bait and go fishing. Having waterfront property on the bay allows us to use them a lot more than trailering, plus we're not landlocked - so I can explore/cruise far and wide.

Maintenance on the Waverunners is pretty simple. Just need to flush the engines out after each use. Winter time, we put them in the garage on a double trailer, use a trickle charger on the batteries and I'll spend 3-4 hours cleaning them up/waxing them and they'll be ready for the following spring/summer.

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