What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

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Barkingsparrow
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Barkingsparrow »

A Memory Called Empire - Arkady Martine.

I really enjoyed this book. A dense, intellectual, Sci-Fi political thriller / murder mystery taking place in the capital city of a multi-planet empire in the far future. Well developed characters and some creative world-building. I can see why the book was nominated for a number of awards. Looking forward to the sequel.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by mega317 »

In May of 1941 the war had just begun. The Germans had the biggest ship that had the biggest guns....

Haven’t heard that since riding in my uncles car probably 20 years ago.
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ruralavalon
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon »

A Rule Against Murder, by Louise Penny.

A family reunion at a lakeside lodge near Three Pines, Quebec results in murder.
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NerdicSkier
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by NerdicSkier »

johnegonpdx wrote: Fri May 22, 2020 9:04 pm Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing; Island of the Blue Dolphins; My Side of the Mountain; The Book of Three. Granted, I'm reading these books to my daughter . . .but I do enjoy them as well.
I recently finished reading The Book of Three to my daughter. I'm so glad that I captured the opportunity to do so before she is too old.
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bertilak
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by bertilak »

mega317 wrote: Sun Aug 02, 2020 11:06 pm In May of 1941 the war had just begun. The Germans had the biggest ship that had the biggest guns....

Haven’t heard that since riding in my uncles car probably 20 years ago.
It's occasionally (often?) on SiriusXM's 60s (or is it '50s?) channel.

"Sink the Bismarck" was the battle cry that shook the seven seas
-- Johnny Horton

He also did the theme song for North to Alaska, a favorite of mine -- the movie and the song!

EDIT: Members of the Western Writers of America chose it as one of the Top 100 Western songs of all time. The bass singing portion is done ("Way up North") by Rusty Goodman. Horton died in an automobile accident 5 November 1960 shortly after the song was released.
Last edited by bertilak on Mon Aug 03, 2020 12:59 pm, edited 5 times in total.
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finanzfrau
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by finanzfrau »

ruralavalon wrote: Wed Sep 19, 2018 3:54 pm
bertilak wrote: Wed Sep 19, 2018 3:49 pm
ruralavalon wrote: Wed Sep 19, 2018 3:44 pm Wild Fire, by Ann Cleeves.

This is the eight and last :( book of the Shetland series of mysteries.
How does the TV series (https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2396135/) compare to the books?
We loved the first two seasons, they compare well to the books.
We loved Shetland, I have read almost all her books. Now interested in watching Vera
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by birnhamwood »

THE RELENTLESS MOON by Robinette Kowal, volume 3 of the Lady Astronaut series, in which colonists, leaving the doomed Earth, rocket to Mars.

I read about it in yesterday's NYT. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/28/insi ... kowal.html
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon »

finanzfrau wrote: Mon Aug 03, 2020 12:51 pm
ruralavalon wrote: Wed Sep 19, 2018 3:54 pm
bertilak wrote: Wed Sep 19, 2018 3:49 pm
ruralavalon wrote: Wed Sep 19, 2018 3:44 pm Wild Fire, by Ann Cleeves.

This is the eight and last :( book of the Shetland series of mysteries.
How does the TV series (https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2396135/) compare to the books?
We loved the first two seasons, they compare well to the books.
We loved Shetland, I have read almost all her books. Now interested in watching Vera
I have read several of the Vera Stanhope series, I don't like it as much as the Shetland series but still recommend reading the books.
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chuckb84
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by chuckb84 »

pezblanco wrote: Fri Jul 24, 2020 7:09 pm
chuckb84 wrote: Sun Jul 12, 2020 5:55 pm Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors.

An up close and personal account of the Battle of Samar, fought on 25 October 1944 between Taffy 3, a small American task force commanded by Rear-Admiral Clifton A.F.("Ziggy") Sprague and the Center Force, and the main body of Japanese Imperial Fleet commanded by Vice-Admiral Takeo Kurita.

A book that is hard to put down.
On your recommendation, I read this book. A good book for WWII Navy aficionados.

I'm reading by the same author, Neptune's Inferno ... about the naval battles around Guadalcanal. More American sailors died in the sea battles around the island (the sea area around Guadalcanal is called Ironbottom Sound for the number of ships that have their graves there) than did the ground forces fighting on the islands themselves. I'm about a third of the way through the book and find that I like it better than the previous one.
Neptune's Inferno is also excellent. The naval battles off Guadalcanal were incredibly vicious fights, with the Japanese scoring some major victories as the US Navy struggled to learn to use radar effectively. It should have been a silver bullet a lot more than it was, but the Navy learned, in a slow, bloody process.
Barkingsparrow
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Barkingsparrow »

chuckb84 wrote: Mon Aug 03, 2020 3:38 pm
pezblanco wrote: Fri Jul 24, 2020 7:09 pm
chuckb84 wrote: Sun Jul 12, 2020 5:55 pm Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors.

An up close and personal account of the Battle of Samar, fought on 25 October 1944 between Taffy 3, a small American task force commanded by Rear-Admiral Clifton A.F.("Ziggy") Sprague and the Center Force, and the main body of Japanese Imperial Fleet commanded by Vice-Admiral Takeo Kurita.

A book that is hard to put down.
On your recommendation, I read this book. A good book for WWII Navy aficionados.

I'm reading by the same author, Neptune's Inferno ... about the naval battles around Guadalcanal. More American sailors died in the sea battles around the island (the sea area around Guadalcanal is called Ironbottom Sound for the number of ships that have their graves there) than did the ground forces fighting on the islands themselves. I'm about a third of the way through the book and find that I like it better than the previous one.
Neptune's Inferno is also excellent. The naval battles off Guadalcanal were incredibly vicious fights, with the Japanese scoring some major victories as the US Navy struggled to learn to use radar effectively. It should have been a silver bullet a lot more than it was, but the Navy learned, in a slow, bloody process.
My uncle was a mechanic in the Navy and was at Guadalcanal. He was transferred to another ship to assist with some repairs. That same night, the original ship to which he was assigned was sunk in a battle with heavy loss of life. He had a nervous breakdown and was done with the war.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Dave55 »

"Simon the Fiddler" by Paulette Jiles. Excellent writing and story. This book is a follow up to "News of the World", both books take place in Texas during and post civil war.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by blackcat allie »

mak1277 wrote: Wed Jan 29, 2020 5:03 pm Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

It's good, hard to put down. Unfortunately the subject matter (apocalypse by flu) is a bit *too* timely for me right now. Just bad timing I'm sure. Right? RIght?
Wonderful book- terrifying and bleak, yet hopeful and elegant.
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ruralavalon
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon »

Dance of the Reptiles, by Carl Hiassen.

This is a collection of newspaper columns from the Miami Herald, mocking Florida politicians, developers and tourists. This is a funny book.
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Barkingsparrow
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Barkingsparrow »

The Battle of Blenheim - Charles Spencer

A riveting, compelling account of one of the more historically critical, yet virtually unknown battles. It's 1704, and a militaristic Louis XIV is threatening to extend his empire into Germany and install a personal choice on the throne of Spain - hence, the War of the Spanish Succession. For years, the French armies have been nearly invincible. John Churchill (ancestor of Sir Winston Churchill) and a gifted military commander, steps in and leads an alliance to a overwhelming and stunning victory at Blenheim, which stops the French empire in its tracks for nearly a century until the rise of Napoleon. The author is somewhat Anglocentric so there's some obvious bias here, but nevertheless, I found the book entertaining,and enjoyed learning of the political and military circumstances of the late 17th century to early 18th century.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by jebmke »

ruralavalon wrote: Sat Aug 08, 2020 11:08 am Dance of the Reptiles, by Carl Hiassen.

This is a collection of newspaper columns from the Miami Herald, mocking Florida politicians, developers and tourists. This is a funny book.
Hiassen can be hilarious. Sadly, his brother was one of the journalists killed by a gunman in Annapolis at the Gazette.
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Nicolas
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Nicolas »

Barkingsparrow wrote: Sat Aug 08, 2020 4:20 pm The Battle of Blenheim - Charles Spencer

A riveting, compelling account of one of the more historically critical, yet virtually unknown battles. It's 1704, and a militaristic Louis XIV is threatening to extend his empire into Germany and install a personal choice on the throne of Spain - hence, the War of the Spanish Succession. For years, the French armies have been nearly invincible. John Churchill (ancestor of Sir Winston Churchill) and a gifted military commander, steps in and leads an alliance to a overwhelming and stunning victory at Blenheim, which stops the French empire in its tracks for nearly a century until the rise of Napoleon. The author is somewhat Anglocentric so there's some obvious bias here, but nevertheless, I found the book entertaining,and enjoyed learning of the political and military circumstances of the late 17th century to early 18th century.
As you probably know, Blenheim Palace in England, where Sir Winston Churchill was born in 1874, is named for the 1704 Battle of Blenheim, and thus ultimately after Blindheim (also known as Blenheim) in Bavaria. It was originally intended to be a reward to John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough for his military triumphs against the French and Bavarians in the War of the Spanish Succession, culminating in the Battle of Blenheim. I visited there a few years ago. If you haven’t been, you should. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blenheim_Palace
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FreeAtLast
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by FreeAtLast »

"The Strangest Man", by Graham Farmelo (Basic Books 2009)

In the space of about 2.5 years (September 1925 - December 1927), three physics geniuses created Quantum Mechanics (QM): Werner Heisenberg, Erwin Schrodinger and Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac. This book is a biography of Dirac. Right up front I want to note that the text is not loaded with lists of impenetrable equations; Farmelo is documenting the man and his life and not the mathematical formalisms he invented to accurately describe events in the quantum realm. Dirac did indeed possess a very unusual personality and Farmelo makes a reasoned argument near the end of the book that Dirac would have been diagnosed as autistic today. He was laconic in the strictest sense of the word and even his close colleagues had great troubles dragging any conversation out of him unless it consisted of pure "physics talk". Dirac's most famous accomplishment was to create a relativistic equation for the electron which was so original and so successful in its immediate application to several QM conundrums that it astounded the entire physics community then and to this day. Dirac experienced a traumatic family situation while growing up, living with an emotionally abusive father, having a brother who committed suicide and tolerating a mother who became overbearing and clinging. Within five years after his famous "electron paper" was published, he traveled to Stockholm along with Heisenberg and Schrodinger to accept the Nobel Prize. I may have stated this opinion in some previous post, but I believe the word "genius" is often applied too easily in these times to various undeserving persona. Farmelo's work portrays the life and thoughts of an actual genius.
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Fat Tails
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Fat Tails »

Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History.

Fantastic historical description of those times in the American Southwest. This should be mandatory reading in history class. If you are a horse lover you will really enjoy this. The title says it all.
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ruralavalon
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon »

Fat Tails wrote: Mon Aug 10, 2020 12:49 am Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History.

Fantastic historical description of those times in the American Southwest. This should be mandatory reading in history class. If you are a horse lover you will really enjoy this. The title says it all.
Empire of The Summer Moon is a very good book about Texas history, the Southern Plaines, and the Comanche tribe.
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birnhamwood
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by birnhamwood »

Yes to Empire of the Summer Moon.

A mighty Baptist preacher effort to get QP to give up some of his wives came to naught!

He did not like the idea!
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Blister
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Blister »

Just started

Evil Geniuses
THE UNMAKING OF AMERICA: A RECENT HISTORY
By KURT ANDERSEN

Interesting take on culture, politics, economics and all that.
Everthing works out in the end. If it doesn't then its not the end.
Barkingsparrow
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Barkingsparrow »

Evolution - The Human Story - Dr Alice Roberts.

Working my way slowly as this is a very detailed, lushly illustrated book intended for the layman. So far, it's provided a fascinating overview of the process/techniques of researching and interpreting the anthropological evidence: fossils, skeletons, dating, and so forth. Looking forward to getting to the meat of this story.
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ruralavalon
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon »

Busman's Holiday, by Dorothy L. Sayers.

An amateur detective and mystery novelist are just married, go to their newly acquired country cottage for their honeymoon, and find a dead man in the basement.

More pages are spent on their adjustment to marriage than to solving the murder mystery. The book is not as good as others by Dorothy Sayers (a matter of personal taste).
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by quantAndHold »

Alexander Hamilton, by Ron Chernow.

America’s ten dollar founding father, in 800 pages of detail. The story of an absolutely brilliant, brilliant guy who probably should have talked less and smiled more. The guy would do something absolutely brilliant, and then he’d immediately put his foot in it. Who knew the country was founded by a bunch of gossips and schemers? Fascinating stuff.
Yes, I’m really that pedantic.
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crystalbank
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by crystalbank »

Uncanny Valley by Anna Weiner.

I stumbled upon an excerpt from the book in the interwebs and got intrigued by it. Alas, I have to say the book is disappointing. One of those 'fish out of water' books in which you're supposed to laugh at the eccentric real life characters and feel smug about yourselves. Instead, I was annoyed by the author (the main subject in the book).

Good thing I checked it out from the library instead of buying it.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by jdb »

Just finished “OWLS OF THE EASTERN ICE, A Quest to Find and Save the World’s Largest Owl” by Jonathan Slaght. The author was a graduate student at University of Minnesota, who for his PhD project decided to study an almost unknown and endangered owl species, Blakiston’s Fish Owl, in far Eastern Russia, Primorye Province next to the Sea of Japan. His father had been an American businessman in Russia and the author was fluent in the Russian language. This book is a chronology of his PhD work over several years in the wilderness of far eastern Russia. I found the book to be fascinating, was sorry when it finally concluded. Highly recommend, especially if have any interest in ecology and wildlife conservation or in the vodka drinking and hunting and fishing and other habits of the Far East Russian natives.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by friar1610 »

Unto Us a Son is Given by Donna Leon. The latest (or at least a very recent release) in the Commissario Brunetti mystery series set in Venice (Italy, not Florida).
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birnhamwood
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by birnhamwood »

Thanks to someone here for recommending the Joe Pickett novels by C.J. box. I just finished “Open Season” (the first of twelve), and will read them all. If you love nature, the environment, the outdoors, or if you sometimes fantasize about being a park ranger or a game warden, or even just working outside, here’s a way to vicariously get some of those thrills.

You’re not likely to find a more likable protagonist than Joe the game warden. He’s a straight arrow, not particularly clever or handsome, just an average Joe. Hard worker. Conscientious to a fault. No shortcuts for Joe, no compromises, no deals, no looking-the-other-way for game poachers. He loves his wife, Marybeth, his pre-teen daughters, and his job.

Comes now an energy company that wants to lay a pipeline across Joe’s section of the Big Horn mountains of Wyoming. Joe knows that the Miller’s weasel, long thought extinct, is actually alive and well in his area of the Big Horns. And the energy company knows that if that word should get out, the environmentalists and save-the-endangered-species ‘do-gooders’ would mount fierce opposition and prevent or delay pipeline construction. Big Money is at stake.

That’s enough to get you started. It’s a light mystery, perfect for summer reading. But it’s also thought-provoking. Is the Endangered Species Act of 1982 really a good thing, its lofty intentions aside? Believe it or not, there are pretty good arguments both ways.

I forgot to mention that there are three murders.
Dave55
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Dave55 »

Just finished "A Private Cathedral" by James Lee Burke, his 40th book and 23rd in the Dave Robicheaux series. Clete Purcell has a larger roll in the book and JLB introduces us to a time traveling hybrid human. If you like JL Burke and Dave Robicheaux, this one is very entertaining and as well written as any JLB's works.

Now reading "Summit" by Harry Farthing. Centers around Mt Everest conquests, modern day and during WW2. Very well written, a page turner.

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Barkingsparrow
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Barkingsparrow »

The World Aflame - A New History of War of Revolution: 1914 - 1945 - Dan Johnson and Marina Amaral

This was a fascinating read. The book is essentially a narrative centered around commentary on colorized photos from 1914 through 1945, from the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand to the atomic bombing of Japan. Warning: the photos provide an unflinching look at the horrors of war, some very gory material.
protagonist
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by protagonist »

Any comments on Carlo Rovelli's "The Order of Time"?

I am considering downloading it on my Kindle.
birnhamwood
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by birnhamwood »

“SCALIA: A Court of One,” by Bruce Allen Murphy

MEMO

FROM: Chief Justice William Rehnquist

TO: Justice Antonin Scalia

SUBJECT: Justice Sandra Day O’Connor

“Nino, you’re pissing off Sandra again. Stop it!”

Ah, but Nino could no more stop pissing off his colleagues than he could stop his prodigious consumption of cigarettes and wine. In due time, according to Murphy’s biography, Scalia managed to level withering personal attacks against Kennedy, Blackmun, Powell, Stevens,and Souter, pissing them all off. Just about everybody over the years except Alito and Thomas.

Thus, the subtitle, “A Court of One.” Over a 25+ year career, Scalia isolated himself, shifted the Court’s centrists to the left, and, according to Murphy, did violence to many of his pet projects, the dismantlement of Roe v Wade, for example. (In the beginning, O’Conner
voted with Scalia 80% of the time; by the 1991 term, only 53% of the time. Kennedy voted with Scalia 84% of the time; this dropped to 62% of the time).

He’s also quite funny. His nine kids he attributes to “Vatican Roulette.”
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by pezblanco »

Just finished Veritas: A Harvard Professor, a Con Man and the Gospel of Jesus's Wife. This is an uncommonly good piece of investigative journalism. Highly recommended.

From the Amazon blurb:

In 2012, Dr. Karen King, a star professor at Harvard Divinity School, announced a blockbuster discovery at a scholarly conference just steps from the Vatican: She had found an ancient fragment of papyrus in which Jesus calls Mary Magdalene "my wife." The tattered manuscript made international headlines. If early Christians believed Jesus was married, it would upend the 2,000-year history of the world's predominant faith, threatening not just the celibate, all-male priesthood but sacred teachings on marriage, sex and women's leadership. Biblical scholars were in an uproar, but King had impeccable credentials as a world-renowned authority on female figures in the lost Christian texts from Egypt known as the Gnostic gospels. "The Gospel of Jesus's Wife"--as she provocatively titled her discovery--was both a crowning career achievement and powerful proof for her arguments that Christianity from its start embraced alternative, and far more inclusive, voices.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by McDougal »

In Harm's Way by Doug Stanton. Story about the tragic sinking of the USS Indianapolis in WWII. Could not put it down.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by jebmke »

A Fatal Grace, Louise Penny. Second in the Inspector Gamache series. Three Pines not looking like a safe place to settle.
When you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Elsebet »

"A Wrinkle in Time" by Madeleine L'Engle. It has been a clue/answer on Jeopardy several times so I decided I better read it.
"...the man who adapts himself to his slender means and makes himself wealthy on a little sum, is the truly rich man..." ~Seneca
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ruralavalon
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon »

Paradise Screwed, by Carl Hiassen.

This is another collection of newspaper articles from the Miami Herald skewering Florida politicians. I recommend this book, it is very funny.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started
protagonist
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by protagonist »

The Order of Time , by Carlo Rovelli

I just started reading it (about a quarter of the way through). So far it is a very readable and thoughtful compendium of ideas of answering the question "what is time?", which is not an easy (or perhaps even possible) one to answer. I can see it heading into an introduction to loop quantum gravity, the leading contender (vs string theory) to explain gravity and the fabric of spacetime (and the crux of Rovelli's work). Yes , he does use a lot of literary and musical references, but I find that makes his writing more compelling to the lay (eg me) reader, and some of his digressions are quite fascinating and amusing. (I liked his description of Copernicus as the wise "Fool on the Hill" who saw the sun going down, but unlike his predecessors who saw the obvious- the sky moving and the Earth standing still, "the eyes in his head saw the world spinning round". That made me laugh.) That said, it is definitely a science book, not just a bunch of musings, and there is a lot to ponder between the lines.
My main critique (not really criticism) is that , because it is so concise, I am often left with the feeling that I need to explore his ideas more, let them germinate, see what others think. As a non-physicist who wouldn't know a Calabi-Yao space from a hole in the ground, even if I fell in one, I am dependent on the kindness of others to help me formulate my views.

Which isn't really a criticism....I don't expect to become a scholar on LQG from reading a 200 page book with one equation, or even to walk away thinking "now I get it!", any more than a similar book on string theory would leave me. But he is a very good writer, and his book, so far, is more readable and digestible than any that I have read on string theory. A bit of background (which I have, as an interested layman) is probably necessary to grasp much of what he writes. For example, he starts off by stating that time passes slower at sea level than on a mountaintop, but never really explains why, and if you were unfamiliar with relativity, you might just be baffled by that. So it's a book for an already informed layman, not a first book to read on modern physics.

He did a great job explaining entropy. I was a bit lost about his equating heat loss with time passing, other than they both seem to follow an "arrow" in the direction of increasing entropy, unlike other processes which are reversible.
So far he has been quite honest in stating what is generally accepted theory vs. his own biases. It's also a "page turner".
Dantes
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Dantes »

It Happened in Boston? by Russell Greenan.

An unusual book, first published in 1968. His books are often considered crime writings; one was even reprinted in the seventies by the Detective Book Club. I ran across a reference to him in a project I am working on, and he sounded interesting; I picked this to start with since it was his first, and I used to live around Boston. The narrator of this story, a very gifted artist, is clearly mad. Good locale, good descriptions of the regulars on the common, and a bit of dirt on art dealers and experts. I was pretty uncertain about this book for the first 50 pages of so, but by the end it was a wow.
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pezblanco
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by pezblanco »

The Eighth Detective by Alex Pavesi This is a stunningly good book .... Highly recommended.

From Amazon:

"One of the most innovative mysteries in recent memory." - The Wall Street Journal

There are rules for murder mysteries. There must be a victim. A suspect. A detective.

Grant McAllister, a professor of mathematics, once sat down and worked all the rules out – and wrote seven perfect detective stories to demonstrate. But that was thirty years ago. Now Grant lives in seclusion on a remote Mediterranean island, counting the rest of his days.

Until Julia Hart, a brilliant, ambitious editor knocks on his door. Julia wishes to republish his book, and together they must revisit those old stories: an author hiding from his past and an editor keen to understand it.

But there are things in the stories that don’t add up. Inconsistencies left by Grant that a sharp-eyed editor begins to suspect are more than mistakes. They may be clues, and Julia finds herself with a mystery of her own to solve.
Nightowl99
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Nightowl99 »

Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man by Mary L. Trump, Ph.D.
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birnhamwood
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by birnhamwood »

I also recommend Mary Trump's book.
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ruralavalon
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon »

The Nine Tailors, by Dorothy L.Sayers.

In a church graveyard an extra body is found in a grave, his identity and cause of death are a mystery. The answer is in the bell tower of the church.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started
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pezblanco
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by pezblanco »

Blacktop Wasteland by S.A. Cosby

American Noir at it's best. I love heist movies and books ... this one is one of the best I've read in a very long time. Take a look at the Amazon reviews if you have any doubts.
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pezblanco
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by pezblanco »

ruralavalon wrote: Sat Aug 29, 2020 6:49 pm The Nine Tailors, by Dorothy L.Sayers.

In a church graveyard an extra body is found in a grave, his identity and cause of death are a mystery. The answer is in the bell tower of the church.
I wish there were something by Sayers that I hadn't read!
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heartwood
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by heartwood »

pezblanco wrote: Sat Aug 29, 2020 7:10 pm Blacktop Wasteland by S.A. Cosby

American Noir at it's best. I love heist movies and books ... this one is one of the best I've read in a very long time. Take a look at the Amazon reviews if you have any doubts.
I finished it a week ago. I recommend it as well. Good dialog, brutal scenes, many unexpected twists.
rockstar
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by rockstar »

The Martian.
whaler08
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by whaler08 »

Evicted by Matthew Desmond. Follows eight family's in Milwaukee ( think Kenosha) Poverty and profit in Wisconsin
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FreeAtLast
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by FreeAtLast »

"12 Seconds Of Silence", by Jamie Holmes (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2020)

If you asked a group of military historians what were the scientific inventions of World War II which most helped the Allies to win the conflict, the consensus would most likely be the atomic bomb and short wavelength radar. I wonder how many in my hypothetical group would also add the proximity fuse. This fuse, when attached to various sizes of artillery shells, would sense when it was close to a desired target and explode the shell. It took away human guessing about the appropriate range to the target, which greatly increased the chance that the target would be struck. The fuse was used very successfully against Japanese bombers attacking Allied warships, against Hitler's V-1 "doodlebugs" flying towards London, and against German infantry battalions at the Battle of the Bulge. The number of Allied lives - both military and civilian - saved by this invention will never be exactly known, but you can bet it was a large number.
At first, the creation of the proximity fuse was considered to be impossible. The shells it would be attached to would experience up to 20,000 "g's" of linear force and tremendous amounts of centrifugal force from the spin imposed upon them. How could any small electronic device with delicate internal components be devised that could tolerate those forces and then do its job when it neared the target? Holmes explains in great detail the extraordinary odyssey towards a successful fuse and the brilliant men - and dedicated women - who led the way. If you weren't in awe of Vannevar Bush, Merle Tuve, and R.V. Jones before you read this book, you certainly will be afterwards. Oh, yes - the "12 Seconds" in the title refers to the time between the cut-off of the engine of a V-1 and it striking the ground.
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FreeAtLast
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by FreeAtLast »

"The Last Stargazers", by Emily Levesque PhD (Sourcebooks 2020)

The author is an young astronomer (36 y.o.) who has already garnered two awards for outstanding promise and research. Her enthusiasm for her subject bubbles off every page at about 373 degrees Kelvin. She takes us from her first exposure to astronomy as a child to her frontier studies of red super giant stars today. She gives us a detailed picture of what practicing astronomers actually do every day, always mentioning the trials, tribulations and wrong pathways that are part of any scientist's life journey. Sometimes the work is literally life-threatening: potential falls from 40-60 feet, a large radio telescope suddenly collapsing, and an actual death of a top astronomer from being crushed between a door and rotating dome. You won't find yourself getting bored because the book is liberally peppered with interesting anecdotes. If you have a potential young scientist in your family, this book will be especially appropriate for them.
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