What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
gkaplan
Posts: 7034
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2007 8:34 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by gkaplan » Fri Nov 07, 2014 7:54 pm

gkaplan wrote:I'm reading Prayer by Philip Kerr. Kerr is the author of the Bernie Gunther series. Prayer, however, is a stand-alone novel. The protagonist is an FBI agent working in the domestic terrorism unit. It's a pretty good read.


Shortly after I posted this, I downgraded my ranking for this book from four stars to one star, just about the time the book went from a domestic terrorism book to a paranormal book that, for me, defied belief. I guess the title should have given me a clue.
Gordon

chaz
Posts: 13601
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 2:44 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by chaz » Wed Nov 12, 2014 3:20 pm

"Napoleon's Pyramids" by William Dietrich.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

gkaplan
Posts: 7034
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2007 8:34 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by gkaplan » Wed Nov 12, 2014 8:26 pm

I am reading The Bone Orchard by Paul Doiron. This is the fifth book in his Mike Bowditch series, and I have loved each of them. I highly recommend the series, but you should read them in the order in which they were written.

http://www.pauldoiron.com/
Gordon

User avatar
ruralavalon
Posts: 11671
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 10:29 am
Location: Illinois

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon » Sat Nov 15, 2014 11:06 am

Neptune's Inferno:the U.S. Navy at Guadalcanal, by James A Hornfischer. In August - November 1942, 6 major naval gunnery battles usually at night, each side lost 24 major combat vessels, 1600 U.S. Marine and Army killed, over 5,000 U.S. sailors killed.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started

MP173
Posts: 1801
Joined: Fri Dec 07, 2007 6:03 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by MP173 » Sat Nov 15, 2014 3:30 pm

Just finished "Taken" by Robert Crais.

As usual, Elvis Cole and Joe Pike find themselves in a tough situation...this time involving human traffic trade.

Entertaining as always.

Ed

chaz
Posts: 13601
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 2:44 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by chaz » Sat Nov 15, 2014 4:09 pm

MP173 wrote:Just finished "Taken" by Robert Crais.

As usual, Elvis Cole and Joe Pike find themselves in a tough situation...this time involving human traffic trade.

Entertaining as always.

Ed

A very good author.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

User avatar
nisiprius
Advisory Board
Posts: 34132
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2007 9:33 am
Location: The terrestrial, globular, planetary hunk of matter, flattened at the poles, is my abode.--O. Henry

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by nisiprius » Sat Nov 15, 2014 4:27 pm

Finished Ken Follett's The Edge of Eternity and thus finished his "Century" trilogy. I more-than-liked everything in the trilogy. I found the historic and political insights to be quite interesting. Very absorbing and feel at lose ends now that I've finished it.

However, it has distinct streaks of cheesiness in it. Too many Dickensian coincidences. Way too many illegitimate births, making it quite difficult to keep track of the characters. Way too many star-crossed lovers, who meet briefly but are then separated for decades by mistaken pre-existing marriages, Berlin Walls, mean-spirit officials, etc. A lot of similarities to The WInds of War and/or Upton Sinclair's Lanny Budd novels, in which characters just manage to be in positions too unimportant to make it into history books but nevertheless present to observe great moments in history, etc. etc.

And The Edge of Eternity drove me nuts by ending and ending and ENDING. Three or four times some great event seems to tie everything in a neat bundle and he seems to be giving little capsule summaries of what happened to the characters afterwards--and then the plot revs up and carries on for a few more chapters.
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

User avatar
nisiprius
Advisory Board
Posts: 34132
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2007 9:33 am
Location: The terrestrial, globular, planetary hunk of matter, flattened at the poles, is my abode.--O. Henry

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by nisiprius » Sun Nov 16, 2014 4:23 pm

Just finished J. M. Barrie's Auld Licht Idylls. Barrie is best known as the author of "Peter Pan." I have rather mixed feelings about it. I had to read it in small doses... and find a Scottish dictionary online.

One might say it belongs to the same genre as Meredith Willson's "The Music Man," or Garrison Keillor's Lake Wobegon tales. Writer pokes gentle and affectionate fun at the town he grew up in... except the fun is not really so gentle or affectionate, and the home-town people are depicted as being comic and clownish.

In Barrie's case, the setting is a little village in Scotland, Kirriemuir, whom Barrie fictionalizes as "Thrums." The "Auld Lichts" are a reference to a conservative Protestant denomination. The simplicity and poverty of the people is far outside my own experience. It is all a little bit too whimsical and exaggerated, a sort of Scottish version of the "Beverly Hillbillies." As an example of the humor...
"They're kittle cattle, the women," said the farmer of Craigiebuckle—son of the Craigiebuckle mentioned elsewhere—a little gloomily. "I've often thocht maiterimony is no onlike the lucky bags th' auld wines has at the muckly. There's prizes an' blanks baith inside, but, losh, ye're far frae sure what ye'll draw oot when ye put in yer han'."

"Ou, weel," said Tammas, complacently, "there's truth in what ye say, but the women can be managed if we have the knack."

"Some o' them," said Cragiebuckle, woefully.

"Ye had yer wark wi' the wife yersel, Tammas, so ye had," observed Lang Tammas, unbending to suit his company.

"Ye're speakin' aboot the bit wife's bural," said Tammas Haggart, with a chuckle, "ay, ay, that brocht her to reason."

Without much pressure Haggart retold a story known to the majority of his hearers. He had not the "knack" of managing women apparently when he married, for he and his gipsy wife "agreed ill thegither" at first. Once Chirsty left him and took up her abode in a house just across the wynd. Instead of routing her out, Tammas, without taking any one into his confidence, determined to treat Chirsty as dead, and celebrate her decease in a "lyke wake"—a last wake. These wakes were very general in Thrums in the old days, though they had ceased to be common by the date of Little Rathie's death. For three days before the burial the friends and neighbours of the mourners were invited into the house to partake of food and drink by the side of the corpse. The dead lay on chairs covered with a white sheet. Dirges were sung, and the deceased was extolled, but when night came the lights were extinguished, and the corpse was left alone. On the morning of the funeral tables were spread with a white cloth outside the house, and food and drink were placed upon them. No neighbour could pass the tables without paying his respects to the dead; and even when the house was in a busy, narrow thoroughfare, this part of the ceremony was never omitted. Tammas did not give Chirsty a wake inside the house; but one Friday morning—it was market-day, and the square was consequently full—it went through the town that the tables were spread before his door. Young and old collected, wandering round the house, and Tammas stood at the tables in his blacks inviting every one to eat and drink. He was pressed to tell what it meant; but nothing could be got from him except that his wife was dead. At times he pressed his hands to his heart, and then he would make wry faces, trying hard to cry. Chirsty watched from a window across the street, until she perhaps began to fear that she really was dead. Unable to stand it any longer, she rushed out into her husband's arms, and shortly afterwards she could have been seen dismantling the tables.

"She's gone this fower year," Tammas said, when he had finished his story, "but up to the end I had no more trouble wi' Chirsty. No, I had the knack o' her."
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

User avatar
black jack
Posts: 646
Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 10:13 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by black jack » Sun Nov 16, 2014 5:06 pm

Good to know that you enjoyed Follett's Century trilogy, Nisiprius. I'm working on the first volume, having recently finished his Cathedral pair (Pillars of the Earth and World Without End), which I greatly enjoyed (at great length).

And I too just finished a Scottish-themed book, sort of: Candlemass Road, by George MacDonald Fraser. Fraser wrote the wonderful Flashman series; he also wrote a history of the English-Scottish border outlaws in the 16th century (The Steel Bonnets). Candlemass Road is a historical fiction based on some elements from that book. "Road" seems to be a synonym for "raid"; the book is about a border raid that happens to fall on the date of Candlemass.

Some of the themes of Candlemass Road sound like what we've learned about inhabitants of the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. This excerpt from the Afterword gives a flavor of the book:

This was the way of the border, and the despair of Wardens and government - that sworn friends one year could be bitter enemies the next, that feuds could run in circles, that some families were both Scottish and English, that others would change their national allegiance overnight (or, in battle, at a moment's notice), and that in all things the borderer was a law (for want of a better word) unto himself.

Which brings me to the one entirely real major character in the story, Thomas Carleton. The Land Sergeant receives extensive coverage in the border letters and reports, and I have presented him as faithfully as I can. Even allowing for the poisonous hatred that colours Thomas Scrope's descriptions of him and his swaggering younger brother, he does seem to have been, if not a complete scoundrel, at least a most subtle, devious, and untrustworthy operator. He was also intelligent, patient, brave, and a first-class law officer when it suited him and he had no ulterior purpose to serve. I confess to some sympathy for him; his was an impossible duty, on such a frontier, where national and local politics had to be conducted in a confusion of crime and feud and contrary loyalities, and only a rigidly upright outsider, untrammelled by border ties, could hope to steer a straight course. Thomas Carleton was practically horizontal, and a borderer to his backbone, but while he was frequently deep in knavery, and ever ready to resort to deceit and betrayal - just now and then we have a sense of a clever, worldly, and probably weary man doing his best, or at least not his worst. He spent a dangerous lifetime in negotiating and dealing and making do, and when all else failed, fighting it out whatever the odds.
We cannot absolutely prove [that they are wrong who say] that we have seen our best days. But so said all who came before us, and with just as much apparent reason. | -T. B. Macaulay (1800-1859)

rec7
Posts: 2185
Joined: Tue Oct 28, 2008 7:22 pm
Location: ST LOUIS

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by rec7 » Sun Nov 16, 2014 5:25 pm

The Holy Bible I read four chapter a day that is reading the whole Bible with many days to spare each year. Of course when I finish I just start over in Genesis. I do this each year. Since I started three years ago I have lost interest in reading other books.

User avatar
seeshells
Posts: 179
Joined: Sun Feb 23, 2014 12:43 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by seeshells » Sun Nov 16, 2014 11:00 pm

"All about Bonds", by Rick Van Ness.. reminded me of the coffeehouse investor, but about bonds. Great read!

Bungo
Posts: 827
Joined: Wed Sep 28, 2011 11:28 am

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Bungo » Mon Nov 17, 2014 4:42 pm

Recently finished The Alienist by Caleb Carr. I wanted to like this more than I did. The setting (1896 New York City) and historical detail were good. The plot was promising: serial killer murdering young boys, and a practitioner ("alienist") of the nascent field of psychology manages to construct a profile sufficiently accurate to identify the killer despite the absence of any physical evidence (although the then-dubious science of fingerprinting also proved useful). I liked the mix of fictional characters and real historical figures such as Theodore Roosevelt and J.P. Morgan. But the characterization was flat and the plot wasn't very satisfying. Three stars out of five.

Now reading Masters of Doom: How Two Guys Created an Empire and Transformed Pop Culture. Brisk but enjoyable read for anyone with an interest in classic ('80s-'90s) video games.

User avatar
bertilak
Posts: 5666
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 5:23 pm
Location: East of the Pecos, West of the Mississippi

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by bertilak » Mon Nov 17, 2014 8:23 pm

Currently reading Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Summary while at page 68 of 221: :thumbsdown

This is (so far) one of the most poorly written books I have recently read.

  • Lots of long pseudo-philosophical ramblings by various characters. I suppose Shelley thought these were either profound or ominous or scary or something. To me they are simply lame.

  • Weirdness: All dates are given as "17--" implying some undetermined year in the 18th century, but more than once characters quote The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, published in -- 1798! So "17--" doesn't obscure the date by much! It is possible that the story is framed in some sort of flashback making this a bit more plausible. I would need to check. (By the Way, Shelley knew Coleridge personally.)

  • Plot hole (or unbelievable behavior): Victor Frankenstein creates his monster while a student in college, almost by mistake. Sure he has been trying hard, but the monster comes alive as a big surprise. None of this throwing the switch to tap the lightning. Young Frankenstein is so shocked and scared by this he runs out of the lab. He comes back and finds the monster gone and then he goes into a two-year funk! He does nothing about his missing monster other than hope no one notices. Well, no one does.

  • Unbelievable coincidence topped off by psychic power: Finally out of his funk after two years he gets a letter saying that his young brother, way back home, has been murdered. He heads home and at the edge of town runs into a thunder and lightening storm. Guess who he spots in the woods off the side of the road. Yup, his monster who has somehow found Frankenstein's home town. To top that off, just by looking at the monster as lit by a flash of lightning he can see that (now get this) it is the monster who has murdered his brother!

OK, that gets you to page 68. If I finish the book it will because reading it is somewhat like watching a slow motion train wreck.

EDIT to add:
For a book which successfully creates a disturbing atmosphere take a look at Heart of Darkness. I don't even know if "disturbing" is the right word. It does grab you and I am sure I will read it again.
Listen very carefully. I shall say this only once. (There! I've said it.)

User avatar
VictoriaF
Posts: 17491
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by VictoriaF » Mon Nov 17, 2014 9:32 pm

I have just finished The Sea by John Banville, the winner of the 2005 Man Booker Prize. In the past few years, I have been reading very little fiction and decided to remedy it in retirement. I signed for a series of four lectures at the Smithsonian, each dedicated to one Man Booker winner, and this was the second book in the series. The sessions are a mix of lectures and group discussions, which I think is a very effective format. The professor also brings some Sherry and cookies, which make the discussions livelier and the understanding deeper.

The Sea is written in a beautiful language, but during the first half the plot was confusing and boring. I persevered under the assumption that I lacked sophistication to appreciate a book that has won such a prestigious award. In today's session, it turned out that the 2005 award was controversial, and many respected (sophisticated!) critics were frustrated by the choice. But by this time not only I have finished the book, but I also grew to like it. I am tempted to read it for the second time right away, armed with the new insights and appreciation. But I will probably move to something else. So many books, so little time...

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

User avatar
black jack
Posts: 646
Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 10:13 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by black jack » Mon Nov 17, 2014 9:46 pm

bertilak wrote:Currently reading Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

[*]Plot hole (or unbelievable behavior): Victor Frankenstein creates his monster while a student in college, almost by mistake. Sure he has been trying hard, but the monster comes alive as a big surprise. None of this throwing the switch to tap the lightning. Young Frankenstein is so shocked and scared by this he runs out of the lab. He comes back and finds the monster gone and then he goes into a two-year funk! He does nothing about his missing monster other than hope no one notices. Well, no one does.


That behavior seems to you unbelievable? To me it seems entirely believable in such a situation, and all too human - faced with an overwhelming but private problem, isn't "if I ignore it maybe it will disappear" the default response?

Linus: "No problem is so big or complicated that it can't be run away from."
We cannot absolutely prove [that they are wrong who say] that we have seen our best days. But so said all who came before us, and with just as much apparent reason. | -T. B. Macaulay (1800-1859)

User avatar
bertilak
Posts: 5666
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 5:23 pm
Location: East of the Pecos, West of the Mississippi

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by bertilak » Mon Nov 17, 2014 11:38 pm

black jack wrote:
bertilak wrote:Currently reading Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

[*]Plot hole (or unbelievable behavior): Victor Frankenstein creates his monster while a student in college, almost by mistake. Sure he has been trying hard, but the monster comes alive as a big surprise. None of this throwing the switch to tap the lightning. Young Frankenstein is so shocked and scared by this he runs out of the lab. He comes back and finds the monster gone and then he goes into a two-year funk! He does nothing about his missing monster other than hope no one notices. Well, no one does.


That behavior seems to you unbelievable? To me it seems entirely believable in such a situation, and all too human - faced with an overwhelming but private problem, isn't "if I ignore it maybe it will disappear" the default response?


I see your point from a theoretical point of view, but it was completely out of character for Victor Frankenstein who was up to that point a pretty self-confident, motivated guy with a strong personality. Utter collapse and complete ineffectiveness just didn't fit. I guess I took that for granted, having just put down the book.
Listen very carefully. I shall say this only once. (There! I've said it.)

User avatar
black jack
Posts: 646
Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 10:13 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by black jack » Tue Nov 18, 2014 8:34 pm

bertilak wrote:
black jack wrote:
bertilak wrote:Currently reading Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

[*]Plot hole (or unbelievable behavior): Victor Frankenstein creates his monster while a student in college, almost by mistake. Sure he has been trying hard, but the monster comes alive as a big surprise. None of this throwing the switch to tap the lightning. Young Frankenstein is so shocked and scared by this he runs out of the lab. He comes back and finds the monster gone and then he goes into a two-year funk! He does nothing about his missing monster other than hope no one notices. Well, no one does.


That behavior seems to you unbelievable? To me it seems entirely believable in such a situation, and all too human - faced with an overwhelming but private problem, isn't "if I ignore it maybe it will disappear" the default response?


I see your point from a theoretical point of view, but it was completely out of character for Victor Frankenstein who was up to that point a pretty self-confident, motivated guy with a strong personality. Utter collapse and complete ineffectiveness just didn't fit. I guess I took that for granted, having just put down the book.


I see your point; it's been decades since I read the book, and Victor Frankenstein's character is a dim memory. And on reflection it does seem odd that, having brought the creature to life, Frankenstein should then have turned his back on the issue for so long. But I imagine if we tried we could think of examples of self-confident motivated people who chose to ignore a problem rather than come to grips with it ("What elephant? I see no elephant in this room").
We cannot absolutely prove [that they are wrong who say] that we have seen our best days. But so said all who came before us, and with just as much apparent reason. | -T. B. Macaulay (1800-1859)

User avatar
avenger
Posts: 748
Joined: Mon Dec 02, 2013 12:11 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by avenger » Fri Nov 21, 2014 8:28 am

"The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life" by Alice Schroeder

About 100 pages in. Nice biography.
cheers ... -Mark | "Our life is frittered away with detail. Simplify. Simplify." -Henry David Thoreau | [3 fund portfolio: VTI, VXUS, SV fund (yield 3.01%)]

Valuethinker
Posts: 33143
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 11:07 am

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Valuethinker » Fri Nov 21, 2014 9:34 am

ruralavalon wrote:Neptune's Inferno:the U.S. Navy at Guadalcanal, by James A Hornfischer. In August - November 1942, 6 major naval gunnery battles usually at night, each side lost 24 major combat vessels, 1600 U.S. Marine and Army killed, over 5,000 U.S. sailors killed.


I read that one.

In the modern era, since Tsushima and Jutland, there has surely never been a more titanic naval struggle. Maybe the Malta Convoys...

The sheer drama of it. The USN, storied of tradition but inexperienced in modern warfare and green manpower, against the honed machine which was the Imperial Japanese Navy-- a superbly trained and equipped machine for destruction (revelation from Norman Friedman, Battleship Firepower-- the Allies did not clearly understand the 40,000+ yard range of the often-decisive Type 92 'Long Lance' oxygen-powered torpedo until 1944! The Japanese were killing Allied ships and the Allies did not understand what was happening, often misreported them as mines).

The Japanese had trained and prepared for this cruiser to cruiser, destroyer to destroyer battle for over 20 years, as the prelude to the final dreadnaught smash, where they knew they would be outnumbered but planned to use torpedoes and submarines and light forces to even the odds. This 'decisive battle' shaped all their tactics, strategy and training.

And in the islands around Guadacanal, they put what they knew into practice. The USN had superior technology (radar!) and the air advantage due to Guadacanal airfield's proximity but it took a long time for those advantages to be properly brought to bear.

This was in many ways, the Pacific War's Stalingrad. When 2 mighty powers, one on the rise, the other in fatal decline, came to meet and fight for ground which neither would yield nor give quarter. Here, and with the Australians on the Kodai trail in New Guinea. The sheer desperation.

It was also probably the last significant set of surface combatant actions in history (ex the Philipines which were much more one-sided).

To be one of my ancestors, standing at that plotting table, or on the bridge, straining to see into the darkness, straining to anticipate what the Japanese would do, to make the right decisions. The lives of thousands of sailors at risk. The defeat of the Allied cause to be in your hands... God, the burden. My grandfather was on 3 ships in one night at Gallipoli-- 2 sunk. In the morning he and the padre walked along the deck, the padre said the last rites and the corpses were tipped one by one into the wine dark sea.

At the Burial of their Dead at Sea

The Office in the Common-Prayer-Book may be used: only instead of these words [We therefore commit his body to the ground, earth to earth, &c.] say,

We therefore commit his body to the deep, to be turned into corruption, looking for the resurrection of the body, (when the Sea shall give up her dead,) and the life of the world to come, through our Lord Jesus Christ; who at his coming shall change our vile body, that it may be like his glorious body, according to the mighty working, whereby he is able to subdue all things to himself.


You catch it in the first seconds of 'Master and Commander: the Far Side of the World' the young midshipman straining to see into the mist, where the enemy privateer approaches. Not knowing whether to order the beat of drums to action. In 'The Cruel Sea' hovering over the ASDIC (sonar) looking at the reflected pulses, looking for the U Boat below. In 'Das Boot' sitting on the bottom whilst the Allied ships ping you from above and drop their patterns of charges.

Another relation stood at the radar plotting screen in the narrow waters of San Carlos Bay, as the Argentine Skyhawks came screaming in, brave pilots carrying death beneath their bellies... and the Exocets flew towards the Task Force.

John Prados 'Islands of Destiny' gives a more strategic view, well nuanced by the author's research into what American codebreakers knew and when.

I have a family connection to Savo Island-- it was not the British Empire's finest day (there's also a book out about the battle of the Java Sea, where every significant allied combatant was sunk I think).

Eric Beregund has written 2 thematic histories 'Fire in the Pacific' and 'Fire in the Sky' about, respectively, the ground war in the South Pacific, and the air war. They have limited chronology, but they are excellent military histories of the times. One hopes, some day, he will write a naval companion.

User avatar
ruralavalon
Posts: 11671
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 10:29 am
Location: Illinois

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon » Fri Nov 21, 2014 10:13 am

Valuethinker wrote:I have a family connection to Savo Island-- it was not the British Empire's finest day (there's also a book out about the battle of the Java Sea, where every significant allied combatant was sunk I think).

That is Ship of Ghosts: The Story of the USS Houston, FDR's Legendary Lost Cruiser, and the Epic Saga of her Survivors.., Cruisers USS Houston and the HMAS Perth survived the Battle of the Java Sea only to be sunk in the Sunda Straight during an attack on a Japanese landing force. The survivors, along with British soldiers captured at Singapore, wound up as slave labor on the Siam-Burma railroad.

Valuethinker wrote:It was also probably the last significant set of surface combatant actions in history (ex the Philippines which were much more one-sided).

By the same author, The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors: The Extraordinary World War II Story of the U.S. Navy's Finest Hour, about the Battle off Samar during the invasion of Leyte. Tiny Destroyer Escorts and Escort Carriers, aircraft shooting at heavy ships with just machine guns or doing dry runs without ammunition at all, fend off Japanese Battleships and Heavy Cruisers to protect the US invasion force in Leyte Gulf.

I have read both, both are compelling narratives of nearly forgotten parts of the WWII in the Pacific.
Last edited by ruralavalon on Fri Nov 21, 2014 10:22 am, edited 1 time in total.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started

Valuethinker
Posts: 33143
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 11:07 am

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Valuethinker » Fri Nov 21, 2014 10:21 am

RuralAvalon

Thank you for those references.

You have these battles in history, when both sides are more or less evenly matched. When history and tradition means that neither can or will give way, when strategically it becomes the place of decision. When it is to the death.

Stalingrad. Guadacanal and the waters around it. The Malta Convoys: the cream of the Luftwaffe and the Italian air force against the Royal Navy. In the Battle of the Atlantic HX229

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convoys_HX_229/SC_122

I knew a man who had a minesweeper on the Murmansk Convoys. PQ 17. It was a massacre-- picked off by U Boats and aircraft against the sun that never sets.

gkaplan
Posts: 7034
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2007 8:34 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by gkaplan » Sun Nov 23, 2014 1:32 pm

I am reading My Life in Middlemarch by Rebecca Mead. Ms. Mead was born and raised in England but has lived and worked in New York City since graduating from Oxford. She has had a lifelong love for George Eliot. She has had a particular fondness for Middlemarch ever since reading and analyzing the book in preparation for her entrance exams to Oxford.
Gordon

User avatar
cfs
Posts: 3380
Joined: Fri Feb 23, 2007 1:22 am
Location: On my camino since 2014

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by cfs » Sun Nov 23, 2014 7:06 pm

Not just another book on President Ronald Reagan.

Currently reading "The Wit and Wisdom of Ronald Reagan" edited by Carol Kelly Gangi (2012). This book "gathers together a hundreds of quotations from Reagan's speeches, books, and other writings that reveal his philosophies, thoughts, and musings on the areas of most importance to him." Short book, only 168 pages. And here is one for the ages: "There is one sign the Soviets can make that would be unmistakable, that would advance dramatically the cause of freedom and peace. General Secretary Gorbachev, if you seek peace, if you seek prosperity for the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, if you seek liberalization, come here to this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!" [Speech at the Brandenburg Gate, West Berlin, Germany, June 12, 1987], (p.93).
~ Donating Member ~

Dave55
Posts: 272
Joined: Tue Sep 03, 2013 2:51 pm
Location: Colorado

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Dave55 » Sun Nov 23, 2014 7:11 pm

"Silent Night"
(A Spenser Holiday Novel)
by Robert B. Parker with Helen Brann

User avatar
seeshells
Posts: 179
Joined: Sun Feb 23, 2014 12:43 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by seeshells » Tue Nov 25, 2014 3:12 am

"History of Commerce" by Clive Day, a "1907" aged free DL.

chaz
Posts: 13601
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 2:44 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by chaz » Tue Nov 25, 2014 4:21 pm

"Reckless Abandon" by Robert Parker.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

jdb
Posts: 1224
Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2012 8:21 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by jdb » Tue Nov 25, 2014 11:18 pm

In Search Of Lost Frogs, by Robin Moore. I was fascinated by this true story of hundreds of dedicated scientists (herpetologists, to be exact) looking for amphibians throughout the world which had been thought extinct, and finding a surprising number of them still in existence, though precarious, and the lessons it teaches us about need to preserve our little planet for fellow creatures and our children.
Last edited by jdb on Wed Nov 26, 2014 9:28 am, edited 2 times in total.

Bungo
Posts: 827
Joined: Wed Sep 28, 2011 11:28 am

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Bungo » Wed Nov 26, 2014 1:22 am

The Trouble With Physics, by Lee Smolin, who provides a critical view of string theory: in a nutshell, it's neither provable nor falsifiable and as such doesn't merit being called a "theory" at all. I don't have a dog in the fight, but after reading Brian Greene's The Elegant Universe a few years ago, and finding it to be almost breathlessly pro-string theory, I figured some balance was in order. :D

User avatar
nisiprius
Advisory Board
Posts: 34132
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2007 9:33 am
Location: The terrestrial, globular, planetary hunk of matter, flattened at the poles, is my abode.--O. Henry

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by nisiprius » Wed Nov 26, 2014 8:05 am

Halfway through Murder at the Savoy, by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö. I'm embarrassed to say I can't actually remember which of their books I've read. I think I might have read this one, but long enough ago as not to matter. Maybe I should do a systematic read-through of the whole series.

Just finished The Accidental Billionaires: The Founding of Facebook, A Tale of Sex, Money, Genius, and Betrayal, by Ben Mezrich, having just watched "The Social Network," which was based on it.
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

User avatar
nisiprius
Advisory Board
Posts: 34132
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2007 9:33 am
Location: The terrestrial, globular, planetary hunk of matter, flattened at the poles, is my abode.--O. Henry

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by nisiprius » Wed Nov 26, 2014 8:19 am

Valuethinker wrote:
At the Burial of their Dead at Sea

The Office in the Common-Prayer-Book may be used: only instead of these words [We therefore commit his body to the ground, earth to earth, &c.] say,

We therefore commit his body to the deep, to be turned into corruption, looking for the resurrection of the body, (when the Sea shall give up her dead,) and the life of the world to come, through our Lord Jesus Christ; who at his coming shall change our vile body, that it may be like his glorious body, according to the mighty working, whereby he is able to subdue all things to himself.
A random synaptic firing evoked Jack London's novel, The Sea-Wolf. I'd like to say "his great novel" but IMHO only the first 3/4 is great--or at least awfully good, but unfortunately the last 1/4 is so Godawful bad that the only pleasure in it is trying to figure out whether Jack London is being intentionally Freudian in the scene about stepping the mast. (This is the novel in which a pair of acknowledged "lovers" is literally cast away on a literal desert island, and proceeds to build two huts).

Anyway: the Nietzschean superman, Darwinian sea-captain Wolf Larsen conducts a burial at sea.
A shower of rain drove down upon us, each drop stinging like a hailstone. As it passed, Wolf Larsen began to speak, the bare-headed men swaying in unison, to the heave and lunge of the deck.

“I only remember one part of the service,” he said, “and that is, ‘And the body shall be cast into the sea.’ So cast it in.”

He ceased speaking. The men holding the hatch-cover seemed perplexed, puzzled no doubt by the briefness of the ceremony....
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

gkaplan
Posts: 7034
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2007 8:34 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by gkaplan » Wed Nov 26, 2014 11:34 am

I just started All Day and a Night: A Novel of Suspense, the latest Ellie Hatcher crime novel of Alafair Burke. I really like this series. Alafair Burke is the daughter of crime novelist James Lee Burke and school librarian Pearl Pai Chu. She went to undergraduate school at Reed College in Portland (Oregon) and law school at Stanford. She worked as an ADA in Portland and at the same time was writing the Samantha Kinkaid crime series. She has since moved to New York where she is a law professor at Hofstra University.
Gordon

User avatar
heartwood
Posts: 1067
Joined: Sat Nov 23, 2013 1:40 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by heartwood » Wed Nov 26, 2014 2:07 pm

I'm about 50 pages into the new William Gibson novel, The Peripheral. I may give it another 20 - 30 pages, but I'm not hopeful for it. It's highly rated at Amazon and at Goodreads, but I'm having a hard time even figuring out what's going on much less understanding it.

Recently enjoyed the John Sandford book, Deadline, a Virgil Flowers novel. Also read Michael Connelly's, The Burning Room. Enjoyed that as well.

chaz
Posts: 13601
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 2:44 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by chaz » Fri Nov 28, 2014 3:04 pm

"Collateral Damage" by Stuart Woods.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

User avatar
seeshells
Posts: 179
Joined: Sun Feb 23, 2014 12:43 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by seeshells » Fri Nov 28, 2014 7:58 pm

"Shapeshifting" by John Perkins.

TPS_Reports
Posts: 116
Joined: Mon Aug 25, 2014 6:34 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by TPS_Reports » Sat Nov 29, 2014 1:31 am

Atlas Shrugged

Ivygirl
Posts: 139
Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2014 1:36 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Ivygirl » Sat Nov 29, 2014 7:54 am

Raquel Welch's autobiography, Raquel: Beyond the Cleavage. Sexy and trashy and yet strangely prudish. Married four times, and on one page she lists the famous leading men she has slept with, and yet kids these days, she says, they have no mystery, no romance, no purity. No true love. Girls carry condoms in their purses nowdays and they hook up.

An extraordinary woman, who hit the genetic lottery for looks, and who made being a woman her lifelong identity and career. The book has her sisterly advice on makeup, hair, aging, menopause, personal style, skin care, nutrition, basically all about how to be a girl. As for dating, she says indulgently that men really only want one thing from you, and if you remember that then you'll be fine.

I enjoyed this book. It tickled me that it was so apparently frank, like a conversation with a glamorous but very scandalous aunt. And I laughed to open the book and see after so many years that famous poster of Raquel as Loana the cave-girl in One Million Years B.C. She looked great.

Ivygirl
Posts: 139
Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2014 1:36 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Ivygirl » Sat Nov 29, 2014 8:13 am

ruralavalon wrote:Wildfire and the Border Legion, by Zane Grey. Set in 19th century Arizona near the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River, a story of ranching, horses, wild-horse catchers, tracking, and all the frontier types. "Wildfire" is a horse, I haven't yet learned what the "border legion" might be.

Am I the only one here who will admit to reading frivolous books with no serious purpose?

Love, love, love Zane Grey. The Shepherd of Guadalupe is my favorite. It concerns a soldier returning from WW I with his lungs destroyed by poison gas. All he wants is to get home so he can die there. He's a wreck, a useless thing, dead but not dead, forgotten by the country he served. Then he meets a woman who gives him hope and a reason to live. But it's living in the desert as a primitive man, a shepherd with his flock - the frosts, the winds, the starlit nights, the burning days, the ruthless purity of the air - that heals him. This is what the American West meant to Zane Grey: a crucible in which men and women were refined by fire.

I will admit to reading frivolous books with no serious purpose every day, and twice on Sunday.

*Edited to add brief plot info.

Herekittykitty
Posts: 526
Joined: Wed Apr 16, 2014 8:11 pm
Location: Flyover Country

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Herekittykitty » Sat Nov 29, 2014 9:20 am

Ivygirl wrote:
ruralavalon wrote:Wildfire and the Border Legion, by Zane Grey. Set in 19th century Arizona near the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River, a story of ranching, horses, wild-horse catchers, tracking, and all the frontier types. "Wildfire" is a horse, I haven't yet learned what the "border legion" might be.

Am I the only one here who will admit to reading frivolous books with no serious purpose?

Love, love, love Zane Grey. The Shepherd of Guadalupe is my favorite. It concerns a soldier returning from WW I with his lungs destroyed by poison gas. All he wants is to get home so he can die there. He's a wreck, a useless thing, dead but not dead, forgotten by the country he served. Then he meets a woman who gives him hope and a reason to live. But it's living in the desert as a primitive man, a shepherd with his flock - the frosts, the winds, the starlit nights, the burning days, the ruthless purity of the air - that heals him. This is what the American West meant to Zane Grey: a crucible in which men and women were refined by fire.

I will admit to reading frivolous books with no serious purpose every day, and twice on Sunday.

*Edited to add brief plot info.


Books that uplift a person aren't frivolous in my opinion.
I don't know anything.

Ivygirl
Posts: 139
Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2014 1:36 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Ivygirl » Sat Nov 29, 2014 9:52 am

Herekittykitty wrote:
Ivygirl wrote:
ruralavalon wrote:Wildfire and the Border Legion, by Zane Grey. Set in 19th century Arizona near the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River, a story of ranching, horses, wild-horse catchers, tracking, and all the frontier types. "Wildfire" is a horse, I haven't yet learned what the "border legion" might be.

Am I the only one here who will admit to reading frivolous books with no serious purpose?

Love, love, love Zane Grey. The Shepherd of Guadalupe is my favorite. It concerns a soldier returning from WW I with his lungs destroyed by poison gas. All he wants is to get home so he can die there. He's a wreck, a useless thing, dead but not dead, forgotten by the country he served. Then he meets a woman who gives him hope and a reason to live. But it's living in the desert as a primitive man, a shepherd with his flock - the frosts, the winds, the starlit nights, the burning days, the ruthless purity of the air - that heals him. This is what the American West meant to Zane Grey: a crucible in which men and women were refined by fire.

I will admit to reading frivolous books with no serious purpose every day, and twice on Sunday.

*Edited to add brief plot info.


Books that uplift a person aren't frivolous in my opinion.

I agree. The only frivolous book is one that does not engage us in our humanity. If it has no story for us, no medicine for us.

Zane Grey knew women. He knew us, and he liked us. He knew that we are strong. One of his favorite themes is, rich tenderfoot girl from the East comes West to find - she knows not what. But she quickly finds that the West demands that she change, that she become either very good or very wicked, because primitive nature has no use for the affectations of civilization. It magnifies and purifies all things in oneself.

This is the true American story, isn't it? Leave decadent civilized old Europe and be changed by the New World. A fresh start. Test yourself against Nature, which tells no comfortable lies, and if you pass you have become something extraordinary.

Bacchus01
Posts: 1102
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 9:35 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Bacchus01 » Sat Nov 29, 2014 10:19 am

I'd love recommendations on modern Sci-Fi. Something in the last 5 years or so. Not fantasy fiction, but real science fiction.

User avatar
LadyGeek
Site Admin
Posts: 41029
Joined: Sat Dec 20, 2008 5:34 pm
Location: Philadelphia
Contact:

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by LadyGeek » Sat Nov 29, 2014 10:46 am

^^^ Good timing. Try The Hellhole Trilogy, by Brian Hebert and Kevin J. Anderson.

I just got the 3rd book in the series, but it's been so long that I'm re-reading the first 2.

Book 1: Hellhole
Book 2: Hellhole: Awakening <-- What I'm on now
Book 3: Hellhole Inferno

I would call this type of sci-fi space opera, which I like.
To some, the glass is half full. To others, the glass is half empty. To an engineer, it's twice the size it needs to be.

User avatar
VictoriaF
Posts: 17491
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by VictoriaF » Sat Nov 29, 2014 10:52 am

Ivygirl wrote:Raquel Welch's autobiography, Raquel: Beyond the Cleavage. Sexy and trashy and yet strangely prudish.
...
As for dating, she says indulgently that men really only want one thing from you, and if you remember that then you'll be fine.


Ivygirl,

Thank you for a review. You made me interested in learning from an expert about that one thing {laughing},

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

Ivygirl
Posts: 139
Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2014 1:36 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Ivygirl » Sat Nov 29, 2014 11:58 am

VictoriaF wrote:
Ivygirl wrote:Raquel Welch's autobiography, Raquel: Beyond the Cleavage. Sexy and trashy and yet strangely prudish.
...
As for dating, she says indulgently that men really only want one thing from you, and if you remember that then you'll be fine.


Ivygirl,

Thank you for a review. I am now interested in learning from an expert about that one thing {laughing},

Victoria

Don't expect details - that cave-girl fur bikini is the perfect metaphor for her career. Show nearly everything - but make 'em imagine the rest. :shock:

That prudish streak was fascinating. It was really feminism. There were so many people who wanted to treat her as a nonentity (just cleavage) but she never lost the sense of herself as a personality with its own right to exist. She wrote just one brief line about Marilyn Monroe, and how she had this feeling that Marilyn was doomed, because she had no strong sense of who she was... I think Raquel survived and thrived and reinvented herself and is full of life into her old age because there were some things she refused to sell. And that's why she's qualified to give advice to other women, and why I (a very different kind of person) liked her book so much.

chaika
Posts: 88
Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2007 2:53 pm
Location: Chapel Hill

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by chaika » Sat Nov 29, 2014 12:51 pm

Just finished 1356 by Bernard Cornwell. Engaging novel about life in medieval France ending with a great battle description between the English and French armies! Although it is a novel there was some real history in it.

User avatar
LadyGeek
Site Admin
Posts: 41029
Joined: Sat Dec 20, 2008 5:34 pm
Location: Philadelphia
Contact:

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by LadyGeek » Mon Dec 01, 2014 5:28 pm

LadyGeek wrote:If Hemingway Wrote JavaScript, by Angus Croll. This is one twisted idea.

I read this courtesy of my MegaEmployer's online subscription service. You can find it online, but I don't think it's worth buying. I skimmed through it in 10 minutes.

Basically, write javascript code in the style of the classical authors. For lack of a better description, I'd call it satire. You can get the gist of the content at the author's website:

- If Hemingway wrote JavaScript
- If Kerouac wrote JavaScript (and Dr Johnson wrote CoffeeScript)
- Salinger, Nabokov and Tupac do JavaScript

Not in the book, but you'll never read poetry the same way again:

- If Edgar Allan Poe wrote JavaScript
- Macbeth’s lost callback

Ars Technica just posted a review: Holiday reading for a certain sort: If Hemingway Wrote JavaScript In the comments section, one of the readers decided to test the example. It works. :)

In Firefox and Chrome, hit "F12" to access the javascript console. Here's the example code shown in the review:

Code: Select all

//Here I am, brain the size of a planet, and they ask me to write JavaScript...
function kevinTheNumberMentioner(_){
l=[]
/* mostly harmless --> */ with(l) {
 
//Sorry about all this, my babel fish has a headache today...
for (ll=!+[]+!![];ll<_+(+!![]);ll++) {
lll=+!![];
while (ll%++lll);
//I've got this terrible pain in all the semicolons down my right-hand side.
(ll==lll)&&push(ll);
}
forEach(alert);
 
         }
 
//You're really not going to like this...
return [!+[]+!+[]+!+[]+!+[]]+[!+[]+!+[]];
}

Then, execute the function. I chose 7 as the runtime parameter.

Code: Select all

kevinTheNumberMentioner(7)

It's still not worth buying, but I had too much time on my hands today. This code does give me a headache and is somewhat reminiscent of The International Obfuscated C Code Contest.
To some, the glass is half full. To others, the glass is half empty. To an engineer, it's twice the size it needs to be.

chaz
Posts: 13601
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 2:44 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by chaz » Tue Dec 02, 2014 3:07 pm

"Almost Dead" by Lisa Jackson.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

gkaplan
Posts: 7034
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2007 8:34 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by gkaplan » Tue Dec 02, 2014 6:53 pm

I'm currently reading The Catholic Church and the Holocaust, 1930-1965 by Michael Phayer.
Gordon

User avatar
nisiprius
Advisory Board
Posts: 34132
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2007 9:33 am
Location: The terrestrial, globular, planetary hunk of matter, flattened at the poles, is my abode.--O. Henry

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by nisiprius » Tue Dec 02, 2014 7:05 pm

Finished Murder at the Savoy, by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö. Excellent.

Having enjoyed The Accidental Billionaires, by Ben Mezrich, I read another book of his, Bringing Down the House: The Inside Story of Six MIT Students Who Took Vegas for Millions and found it to be a page-turner but basically unsatisfying and depressing. One curious aspect of it: at the height of their operations, when they were being treated as "whales" and comped and winning the favors of showgirls etc., when you do the math, the actual "earnings" of each person on the team seem to have been on the rough order of $5,000 for one weekend. Now it's true that's only the weekend, and it's also true that $250,000/year isn't bad for people that age at that year, but it's still not... well, it's not Facebook-scale. It's not even starting-salary-at-Wall-Street scale, is it? Although it's pretty funny to read about college students discovering lost packages of $100 bills in their dorm-room laundry baskets, etc.

Started The Abominable Man, by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö. I do believe that the last time around was so long ago that they had only written about six books, and now I have the pleasure of discovering that they wrote ... more. Or perhaps, of course, I read them before and just forgot them.
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

nbseer
Posts: 154
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2014 10:00 am
Location: New Jersey

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by nbseer » Tue Dec 02, 2014 7:07 pm

"Little Failure: A Memoir" by Gary Shteyngart.

Truly a black comedy of a young Russian boy emigrating to NYC, his life growing up, his disfunctional family and relatives, various horrors and travails he encounters on the road to manhood.

I first encountered Shteyngard's writings a compilation of travel writings. He's an amazing writer that can combine pathos with phrases that had me crying with laughter.

crg11
Posts: 390
Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2014 8:16 am

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by crg11 » Tue Dec 02, 2014 7:23 pm

Just finished Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand. It's already been talked about in another dedicated thread viewtopic.php?f=11&t=151811&p=2279405#p2279405, but I cannot recommend this book enough. Teared up a few times at the extreme cruelty humans can be capable of and yet how we can somehow forgive in the end. What an inspiring story.

My next book might be Grey Mountain by John Grisham...one of my favorite authors.

Post Reply