What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

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d0gerz
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby d0gerz » Sun Apr 16, 2017 11:33 pm

Knocking on Heaven's Door: How Physics and Scientific Thinking Illuminate the Universe and the Modern World by Lisa Randall. This book is mainly about theoretical particle physics, and reviews suggested it would be accessible to a layperson like me. Disappointingly I grasped maybe 10% tops. Incredibly dense and can't recall ever wanting a book to end as much as this one. Good introduction to the Large Hadron Collider (book was written before the discovery of the Higgs Boson), beyond that can't say much as most of it went over my head.

hudson
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby hudson » Mon Apr 17, 2017 6:21 am

The Ghosts of the Green Grass… The Journey of the Second Battalion Seventh Cavalry….into the Hell of the Ia Drang Valley in 1965.

The book was written by a communications branch lieutenant, Bud Alley, who was fully involved in the action. The action took place the next day after the battle described in the book, "We Were Soldiers Once and Young."

From my notes:

The unit sailed to Vietnam on the USS Rose in 1965. I sailed on that same (WW2 Era) troop ship to Germany in 1964.
The commanding general of the 1st Cavalry Div...Harry W O Kinnard, was the operations officer for Colonel McAuliffe ("Nuts") during the Battle of Bastogne in WW2.

The author loved beanie weenies, but hated the ham (and limas) C-Rations.

Lt. Col Edward Shy Meyer was the Brigade Executive Officer; I remember General Meyer later from Fort Bragg.

Lt. Alley described much of his work as a battalion commo officer. He discussed the 292 antenna and his work insuring good communications. He ended up doing his share of infantry combat. In the beginning, he didn't pay much attention to which weapon or how much ammo he carried; after the battle, he said, "You can never have too much ammo."

Artful Dodger
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby Artful Dodger » Mon Apr 17, 2017 3:30 pm

Rat F**ked by David Daley

Fascinating book on the Republican REDMAP (Redistricting Majority Project) program leading up to the 2010 elections. The program focused on winning state legislative races in order to win majorities in certain close states, then move on to redrawing the congressional district lines after the 2010 census.

Broken Man 1999
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby Broken Man 1999 » Tue Apr 18, 2017 11:30 am

White Trash - The 400-year Untold History of Class in America by Nancy Isenberg

Yep. From it's founding America has had classes.

Broken Man 1999

mancich
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby mancich » Tue Apr 18, 2017 2:26 pm

Stretch by Scott Sonenshein. It appeals to me as a Boglehead in that it emphasizes making resources "stretch" further, rather than constantly chasing more resources.

jdb
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby jdb » Tue Apr 18, 2017 9:11 pm

ruralavalon wrote:The Lost City of the Monkey God, by Douglas Preston.

The compelling true story of archeology in an uninhabited, jungle covered, mountain valley of Honduras in 2015-16.

+1. Fascinating recent true story combining Indiana Jones type archeology hunt in remote and uninhabited area of Honduras but using helicopters and laser earth mapping equipment combined with biting insects, poisonous snakes and parasitic tropical diseases. Only problem is now have occasional nightmares of stepping on fer-de-lance while walking in woods. You may need to read the book to understand.

Nicolas
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby Nicolas » Tue Apr 18, 2017 10:02 pm

Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes, translated into English by Edith Grossman. Reputed to be the greatest novel of all time, in any language, and this is supposed to be one of the best English translations. (I'm studying Spanish but am not proficient enough to read it in the original, and certainly not in early 17th century Spanish).
I was actually about a third of the way into this volume several years ago but I became distracted and set it down. Now I'm starting again from the beginning. https://www.amazon.com/Don-Quixote-Migu ... e+grossman
Non bene pro toto libertas venditur auro. -- Aesop

Fallible
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby Fallible » Tue Apr 18, 2017 11:33 pm

Nicolas wrote:Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes, translated into English by Edith Grossman. Reputed to be the greatest novel of all time, in any language, and this is supposed to be one of the best English translations. (I'm studying Spanish but am not proficient enough to read it in the original, and certainly not in 17th century Spanish).
I was actually about a third of the way into this volume several years ago but I became distracted and set it down. Now I'm starting again from the beginning. https://www.amazon.com/Don-Quixote-Migu ... e+grossman


Some coincidence here. Bertilak also posted here recently that he had returned to the novel, this time to the Grossman translation, and I, who also had read only part of the novel before stopping many years ago, then bought that translation and am now reading it with delight. Wonder if we'll all make it through this time. :happy
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Dantes
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby Dantes » Wed Apr 19, 2017 5:52 am

The Possessed. Adventures with Russian Books and the People Who Read Them by Elif Batuman. Basically a collection of essays about her experiences as a graduate student in Russian Lit at Stanford with sojourns abroad - Samarkand, Turkey, etc. Funny, absurd, but also real. In spite of the humor and occasional absurdity of situation there is a lot to think about in this book; its filled with a love of literature.

Cover is by Roz Chast, who does great cartoons for the New Yorker.

She has a new book out, The Idiot, a novel about a Freshman at Harvard, which I will definitely seek out.

rakornacki1
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby rakornacki1 » Wed Apr 19, 2017 6:00 am

The Undoing Project by Michael Lewis.

A terrific read into a discovery on how two psychologists seamlessly integrated the use of statistics into value-based judgements and predictions. It also demonstrated why 'regret' is so powerful when making decisions.

jebmke
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby jebmke » Wed Apr 19, 2017 7:19 am

If the Dead Rise Not by Philip Kerr. Continuation of the Bernie Gunther series.
When you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount.

Nicolas
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby Nicolas » Wed Apr 19, 2017 8:11 am

Fallible wrote:
Nicolas wrote:Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes, translated into English by Edith Grossman. Reputed to be the greatest novel of all time, in any language, and this is supposed to be one of the best English translations. (I'm studying Spanish but am not proficient enough to read it in the original, and certainly not in 17th century Spanish).
I was actually about a third of the way into this volume several years ago but I became distracted and set it down. Now I'm starting again from the beginning. https://www.amazon.com/Don-Quixote-Migu ... e+grossman


Some coincidence here. Bertilak also posted here recently that he had returned to the novel, this time to the Grossman translation, and I, who also had read only part of the novel before stopping many years ago, then bought that translation and am now reading it with delight. Wonder if we'll all make it through this time. :happy


Interesting Fallible, thanks. Yes I saw Berti's post too. Now that I'm retired and have a lot of time on my hands, I fully intend to finish it! I read all the prefaces, prologues, notes, and introductions, and now I'm through the sonnets section where some very famous knights, ladies, and one squire (and a horse) congratulate the great Quixote and Panza (!) and I'm ready to start Book 1.
Non bene pro toto libertas venditur auro. -- Aesop

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ruralavalon
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby ruralavalon » Wed Apr 19, 2017 9:00 am

Fallible wrote:
Nicolas wrote:Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes, translated into English by Edith Grossman. Reputed to be the greatest novel of all time, in any language, and this is supposed to be one of the best English translations. (I'm studying Spanish but am not proficient enough to read it in the original, and certainly not in 17th century Spanish).
I was actually about a third of the way into this volume several years ago but I became distracted and set it down. Now I'm starting again from the beginning. https://www.amazon.com/Don-Quixote-Migu ... e+grossman


Some coincidence here. Bertilak also posted here recently that he had returned to the novel, this time to the Grossman translation, and I, who also had read only part of the novel before stopping many years ago, then bought that translation and am now reading it with delight. Wonder if we'll all make it through this time. :happy

This is an excellent choice for some enjoyable reading, young or old, proficient in Spanish or not.

When younger my Spanish was good enough to read in that language, and I read parts in Spanish then. I have now read the entire novel in English.
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bertilak
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby bertilak » Wed Apr 19, 2017 9:06 am

Nicolas wrote:
Fallible wrote:
Nicolas wrote:Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes, translated into English by Edith Grossman. Reputed to be the greatest novel of all time, in any language, and this is supposed to be one of the best English translations. (I'm studying Spanish but am not proficient enough to read it in the original, and certainly not in 17th century Spanish).
I was actually about a third of the way into this volume several years ago but I became distracted and set it down. Now I'm starting again from the beginning. https://www.amazon.com/Don-Quixote-Migu ... e+grossman


Some coincidence here. Bertilak also posted here recently that he had returned to the novel, this time to the Grossman translation, and I, who also had read only part of the novel before stopping many years ago, then bought that translation and am now reading it with delight. Wonder if we'll all make it through this time. :happy


Interesting Fallible, thanks. Yes I saw Berti's post too. Now that I'm retired and have a lot of time on my hands, I fully intend to finish it! I read all the prefaces, prologues, notes, and introductions, and now I'm through the sonnets section where some very famous knights, ladies, and one squire (and a horse) congratulate the great Quixote and Panza (!) and I'm ready to start Book 1.

Hi all.

I'm about 2/3 the way through Grossman's Don Quixote which puts me well into Part II. I continue to appreciate this translation. As is usual, I got distracted by other books (and other life events) so stalled out on DQ. DQ itself interrupted another book I am well into (Peter Green's 2015 translation of The Iliad).Two other distractions in the stack: John LeCarre's Pigeon Tunnel (reminiscences at age 84) and Peter Hopkirk's Setting the East Ablaze (Central Asia during WW I). I am easily distracted but will eventually get to them all. As Homer Simpson says: "Oh look! A blue car!"
I have a strong moral sense - by my standards. | -- Rex Stout

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bertilak
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby bertilak » Wed Apr 19, 2017 9:12 am

ruralavalon wrote:When younger my Spanish was good enough to read in that language, and I read parts in Spanish then. I have now read the entire novel in English.

Do you remember which translation? How well does it hold up in translation. I always feel I am experiencing translated works through a gauze. That's why I often read multiple translations of works that make an impression on me; if I get enough different views perhaps that overcomes the haze.
I have a strong moral sense - by my standards. | -- Rex Stout

Pocanutin
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby Pocanutin » Wed Apr 19, 2017 10:11 am

Another vote for SAPIENS...this is my second reading and still learning!

Also his newest book (and follow-up) HOMO DEUS. A fascinating read.

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FreeAtLast
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby FreeAtLast » Thu Apr 20, 2017 9:30 pm

bertilak wrote:
ruralavalon wrote:When younger my Spanish was good enough to read in that language, and I read parts in Spanish then. I have now read the entire novel in English.

Do you remember which translation? How well does it hold up in translation. I always feel I am experiencing translated works through a gauze. That's why I often read multiple translations of works that make an impression on me; if I get enough different views perhaps that overcomes the haze.


I took Spanish Literature in college (freshman year) and Don Quixote was on the reading list. I seem to remember that in the text we were given, the Spanish was "archaic" in many instances, and the editor provided a virtual torrent of explanatory footnotes. Did anyone else have this experience?
Illegitimi non carborundum.

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bertilak
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby bertilak » Thu Apr 20, 2017 10:18 pm

FreeAtLast wrote:
bertilak wrote:
ruralavalon wrote:When younger my Spanish was good enough to read in that language, and I read parts in Spanish then. I have now read the entire novel in English.

Do you remember which translation? How well does it hold up in translation. I always feel I am experiencing translated works through a gauze. That's why I often read multiple translations of works that make an impression on me; if I get enough different views perhaps that overcomes the haze.


I took Spanish Literature in college (freshman year) and Don Quixote was on the reading list. I seem to remember that in the text we were given, the Spanish was "archaic" in many instances, and the editor provided a virtual torrent of explanatory footnotes. Did anyone else have this experience?

Years ago, when I first tried to get through DQ I bumped into a Spanish teacher and asked about learning Spanish in order to red DQ in the original. He sad don't bother -- it would be a lot like trying to read Middle English: close but still needing translation.
I have a strong moral sense - by my standards. | -- Rex Stout

SGM
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby SGM » Fri Apr 21, 2017 3:36 am

Far from the Madding Crowd and The Return of the Native by Hardy were read in the last month. The main character in The Return of the Native was not the most interesting character of the novel. Hardy has terrific insight that I find lacking in a lot of modern authors. I can immediately care about his characters.

Prior to that I read Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler based on the Taming of the Shrew. Where else does this occur except in Baltimore. I much prefer to read Anne Tyler books based on Shakespeare than to go to a modern interpretation of Shakespeare by our "illustrious" Shakespeare Company. We are no longer season ticket holders.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby Fallible » Fri Apr 21, 2017 7:13 pm

bertilak wrote: ...
Hi all.
I'm about 2/3 the way through Grossman's Don Quixote which puts me well into Part II. I continue to appreciate this translation. As is usual, I got distracted by other books (and other life events) so stalled out on DQ. DQ itself interrupted another book I am well into (Peter Green's 2015 translation of The Iliad).Two other distractions in the stack: John LeCarre's Pigeon Tunnel (reminiscences at age 84) and Peter Hopkirk's Setting the East Ablaze (Central Asia during WW I). I am easily distracted but will eventually get to them all. As Homer Simpson says: "Oh look! A blue car!"


Yes, I've had my usual distractions, too, but was spurred on, so to speak, to continue reading DQ after coming across what must be one of the greatest says-it-all quotes in the book: "What giants?"
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MP173
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby MP173 » Sat Apr 22, 2017 5:34 am

Just finished the 700 page "Mississippi Blood" by Greg Isles. This is the third in the trilogy dealing with black and white families in Natchez Ms and the violence involved in the 1960s thru a KKK splinter group called the Double Eagles and the effects of that hatred decades later.

These three books were great. Isles is one of my favorite authors and he took on race, hatred, and the Deep South in three well written and received books. The book centers around Cage Penn, the Mayor of Natchez (and a former prosecutor in Houston) and his father, a local physcian who had an affair with his black nurse in the 1960s. She comes home to die (of cancer) and that return escalates into murder and violence as the Double Eagles (made up of nasty old men by now) vow to keep her (and others) silent.

Couldnt stop reading it.

Ed

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ruralavalon
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby ruralavalon » Sat Apr 22, 2017 9:26 am

Hallowe'en Party, by Agatha Christie.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | | Wiki article link:Getting Started

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heartwood
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby heartwood » Sat Apr 22, 2017 9:47 am

I read Tana French's In the Woods last year. It's a Dublin (Ireland) Murder Squad story set in the early 2000s. I liked it.

I'm midway in her 2nd Murder Squad book, The Likeness. Some of the same characters, but a very different mileau. A woman is found murdered out in the country. She looks exactly like the detective from the 1st book who's moved on to a less fulfilling role in Domestic Violence. Will she accept an assignment to go undercover as the dead woman to try to determine who murdered her? Perhaps improbable in concept, but a good read so far. Plus there are other novels in the series.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Postby jebmke » Sat Apr 22, 2017 9:51 am

I have read all the Tana French novels. Each one introduces a new character who becomes the main character in the next novel. In that respect, they are best read in sequence.
When you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount.


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