How to deny having a stroke?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Locked
Topic Author
denismurf
Posts: 544
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 6:29 pm

How to deny having a stroke?

Post by denismurf » Sat Jun 07, 2014 11:44 pm

Radio these days is full of public service ads telling the public to be aware of people having strokes and to call 911 as quickly as possible if certain signs appear.

A couple of weeks ago, I was really tired at my evening meal in a family Thai restaurant where I was known. As I finished up, I literally fell asleep and was floundering around trying to get up out of the chair when the owner came up to me, told me I looked like I was having a stroke, and called 911. I did not agree, but finally gave in to avoid an argument.

Turned out, there was no stroke, but the appearances certainly coincided with what's portrayed in the radio ads, and, thanks to this incident I learned that I have atrial fibrillation. Has anybody come up with a script to deploy when a stranger calls 911 on your behalf, and you don't believe it's warranted?

User avatar
pjstack
Posts: 1308
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 5:03 am
Location: Harbor City, CA

Re: How to deny having a stroke?

Post by pjstack » Sun Jun 08, 2014 2:05 am

If a bystander is alarmed enough by your looks or behavior to call 911, you might not be the best judge of your own condition.
pjstack

HIinvestor
Posts: 1833
Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2014 3:23 am

Re: How to deny having a stroke?

Post by HIinvestor » Sun Jun 08, 2014 2:22 am

In my mind, it's best to err on the side of caution, especially when prompt medical care COULD save pretty major future health consequences. When folks DO have a stroke, time is of the essence in getting appropriate treatment to minimize the harm and damage. What a thoughtful restaurant and bystander!

Like the poster above, I'm not convinced that we are the best judge of what should happen next, if we have fallen asleep in public and are having trouble with coordination.

User avatar
in_reality
Posts: 4529
Joined: Fri Jul 12, 2013 6:13 am

Re: How to deny having a stroke?

Post by in_reality » Sun Jun 08, 2014 5:51 am

Did you have to pay anything?

Maybe you could have suggested they would end up with the bill because you are not the one calling. Not sure if it'd work though.

Achelois
Posts: 122
Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2011 12:50 pm

Re: How to deny having a stroke?

Post by Achelois » Sun Jun 08, 2014 6:10 am

It is possible to have either a stroke or a TIA due to clots in the heart from the fibrillation. If you " fell asleep" and then were floundering it is certainly possible you were experiencing a TIA or transient ischemic attack. The TIA doesn't leave permanent damage but is a warning.

The bystander most likely did you a big favor.

The physicians here will be better able to address this, but that is MHO.

ks289
Posts: 642
Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2012 12:42 pm

Re: How to deny having a stroke?

Post by ks289 » Sun Jun 08, 2014 6:20 am

Not a good idea IMO to argue about the necessity of 911 call in general for possible medical emergencies and particularly when it appears that someone has fainted. This may be a true medical emergency such as a stroke, serious arrhythmia, etc. Falling asleep (or temporarily losing consciousness) and floundering (or appearing weak or confused) both legitimately are unexpected in this situation and deserve more assessment. As you know, if there is doubt about the seriousness of a medical situation, it is generally safer to call and be assessed by EMS professionals.

livesoft
Posts: 69586
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 8:00 pm

Re: How to deny having a stroke?

Post by livesoft » Sun Jun 08, 2014 6:26 am

Here's the script, "Thanks for calling 911. I appreciate it."

I have called 911. The person was transported to the hosptial, never left, and died 2 weeks later.
Wiki This signature message sponsored by sscritic: Learn to fish.

The Wizard
Posts: 13356
Joined: Tue Mar 23, 2010 1:45 pm
Location: Reading, MA

Re: How to deny having a stroke?

Post by The Wizard » Sun Jun 08, 2014 7:04 am

It's unusual to "fall asleep" in a public place, in the absence of a long sermon or PowerPoint presentation.
So without getting into medical suppositions, it's good that 911 assistance was called.
Be thankful you can say Thank You without slurring your speech...
Attempted new signature...

User avatar
Raymond
Posts: 1482
Joined: Mon Apr 16, 2012 6:04 am

Re: How to deny having a stroke?

Post by Raymond » Sun Jun 08, 2014 7:08 am

Thank the restuarant owner for calling, go there often, give the waitperson generous tips, give them good reviews online :happy

-----

My wife (ER nurse) hears this situation every so often:

"My husband was confused and thrashing around this morning after breakfast, but then he said he was OK. I wanted to call 911 or take him to the hospital, but he didn't want to bother anyone, 'it'll go away.' He got better after a few minutes. Then we went to the store just before lunch, when he fell down and couldn't move his left side or talk. The people at the store called the ambulance and here we are. Is he going to be OK?" :(

As mentioned by Achelois, atrial fibrillation is a risk factor for stroke:

"What are the Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation (AFib or AF)?" - American Heart Association

"Time is brain" - brain tissue is rapidly lost as a stroke progresses - a few minutes could be the difference between recovery and... well, not recovery.

"Time is brain--quantified" - PubMed.gov

From the abstract:

"Compared with the normal rate of neuron loss in brain aging, the ischemic brain ages 3.6 years each hour without treatment."

"The typical patient loses 1.9 million neurons each minute in which stroke is untreated."
pjstack wrote:If a bystander is alarmed enough by your looks or behavior to call 911, you might not be the best judge of your own condition.
+1
"Ritter, Tod und Teufel"

lululu
Posts: 1378
Joined: Thu Apr 10, 2014 4:23 pm

Re: How to deny having a stroke?

Post by lululu » Sun Jun 08, 2014 7:36 am

denismurf wrote:Radio these days is full of public service ads telling the public to be aware of people having strokes and to call 911 as quickly as possible if certain signs appear.

A couple of weeks ago, I was really tired at my evening meal in a family Thai restaurant where I was known. As I finished up, I literally fell asleep and was floundering around trying to get up out of the chair when the owner came up to me, told me I looked like I was having a stroke, and called 911. I did not agree, but finally gave in to avoid an argument.

Turned out, there was no stroke, but the appearances certainly coincided with what's portrayed in the radio ads, and, thanks to this incident I learned that I have atrial fibrillation. Has anybody come up with a script to deploy when a stranger calls 911 on your behalf, and you don't believe it's warranted?
Yes. Say Thank you very much and go with the 911 folks.

Some years ago I read a newspaper article about how emergency responders are trained to not pay too much attention to a victim's saying they don't need help, because often they do, even if they don't think so. The point of the article was that if laypeople come upon someone who seems to be in difficulty, to not just accept the I'm okay answer without making sure.

The admins will probably delete this, but with proper medical care and appropriate meds, an afib person's risk of stroke is no higher than the general public's and the life expectancy is the same. Note the qualification with proper medical care and meds.

BigTom
Posts: 209
Joined: Sat Apr 26, 2014 5:43 pm

Re: How to deny having a stroke?

Post by BigTom » Sun Jun 08, 2014 7:50 am

denismurf wrote:Radio these days is full of public service ads telling the public to be aware of people having strokes and to call 911 as quickly as possible if certain signs appear.

A couple of weeks ago, I was really tired at my evening meal in a family Thai restaurant where I was known. As I finished up, I literally fell asleep and was floundering around trying to get up out of the chair when the owner came up to me, told me I looked like I was having a stroke, and called 911. I did not agree, but finally gave in to avoid an argument.

Turned out, there was no stroke, but the appearances certainly coincided with what's portrayed in the radio ads, and, thanks to this incident I learned that I have atrial fibrillation. Has anybody come up with a script to deploy when a stranger calls 911 on your behalf, and you don't believe it's warranted?
You are lucky you had someone that cared enough to call for you . Don't complained about it . This is the reason most people would see say that guy doesn't look good and keep walking because they are scared they will get sued . It's a F ed up world we are living in today .

Is it normal that you fall asleep at a dinner table . If not something was wrong no . That doesn't alarm you . You should be on your knees thanking that man , nit complaining because he mis diagnosed you . This post makes me sick .

User avatar
bertilak
Posts: 7007
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 5:23 pm
Location: East of the Pecos, West of the Mississippi

Re: How to deny having a stroke?

Post by bertilak » Sun Jun 08, 2014 8:11 am

denismurf wrote:... thanks to this incident I learned that I have atrial fibrillation. Has anybody come up with a script to deploy when a stranger calls 911 on your behalf, and you don't believe it's warranted?
Well it seems it was a good thing 911 was called. The fact that the owner "diagnosed" the wrong cardiovascular problem is not a bad thing: the call was warranted.

It is odd that I discovered my own afib problem in nearly the same way -- at a restaurant. As we were all about to get up and leave I suddenly realized that if I stood up I would almost certainly fall down (sort of waves of dizziness). After a few minutes rest, I had my wife drive me to the hospital ER. I now have the proper meds and other treatment to deal with the situation. I was told that I had worse than a 50/50 chance to have survived and walked out of that restaurant alive.

I won't give any medical advice, but do take this very seriously. And be glad the owner did call 911 despite your protestations. Could it be that you really didn't try too hard to stop him?
May neither drought nor rain nor blizzard disturb the joy juice in your gizzard. -- Squire Omar Barker (aka S.O.B.), the Cowboy Poet

ripete
Posts: 80
Joined: Fri May 25, 2012 5:11 pm

Re: How to deny having a stroke?

Post by ripete » Sun Jun 08, 2014 8:25 am

The fact that you live in these United States and are privvy to an excellent health care system should not be a benefit that you ignore.
Minimizing things is all too common in human nature. We all do it. We all deny. To have been diagnosed, as opposed to unknowlingly walking around with it, is truly a godsend.
Let's see. Why could you have afib? 1) mitral stenosis ? 2) ischemic heart disease? 3)thyrotoxicosis? 4) too much caffeine?

Any of these are worth looking into? As one of the other posters mentioned, a clot could have developed in your atrium if you have been in
a fib for awhile, or if you've been in and out of fib, there's the risk that you could shoot a clot up when you're in sinus and have a stroke.
Cardiologists will not convert someone from atrial fibrillation into sinus rhythm until they do an echocardiogram, just to make sure no clot has already formed.
As everyone here has already said, you should post this restaurant on Zagat's as one of the best out there, because they're not just paying lip service when they're asking if everything is all right.
As for you, you should now be very keenly aware about your health, and you should pay attention to lightheadedness, palpitations, etc. etc.
Make sure you follow up with your doctor and don't just leave it at the ER as a 'bad experience'. To the contrary, you've been extraordinarily lucky.

Alex Frakt
Founder
Posts: 10861
Joined: Fri Feb 23, 2007 1:06 pm
Location: Chicago
Contact:

Re: How to deny having a stroke?

Post by Alex Frakt » Sun Jun 08, 2014 8:35 am

Locked. Questions on medical issues are beyond the scope of the forum.

Locked