What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
User avatar
Mel Lindauer
Moderator
Posts: 31206
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 8:49 pm
Location: Daytona Beach Shores, Florida
Contact:

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by Mel Lindauer »

Toured historic Bridge Street all lit up with Christmas lights last night Theatre tonight. Christmas parade tomorrow. All without a jacket and two out of three of those events in shorts. Did 5 miles on the beach last two days. Life is good!
Best Regards - Mel | | Semper Fi
The Wizard
Posts: 13356
Joined: Tue Mar 23, 2010 1:45 pm
Location: Reading, MA

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by The Wizard »

VictoriaF wrote: Did you actually live in Florida or you were coming there for the winter? I think there is a difference between the two, because if you come for a short period of time you are motivated to use your time efficiently and you are not that interested in becoming a part of the local community. When you live in a place, you are probably more concerned about building local connections and less in a hurry to see interesting sites.

Victoria
No, never lived there; just a few weeks a year at most visiting the same place a few times per year.
So I tried to synthesize an answer based on that experience combined with my present no-so-early retirement.
I quit employment in March as you know and am now going into my first winter as a retiree.
We'll see if a cabin fever situation happens soon enough...
Attempted new signature...
User avatar
Topic Author
VictoriaF
Posts: 19500
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by VictoriaF »

EternalOptimist wrote:Victoria, my wife is retiring at the end of this year and we are thinking about Florida being maybe a permanent part of our future. To start, we've rented a condo in Sarasota for the month of Feb '14, we were there last spring and really liked it. I've been told by many to rent for like a year and see how it feels. I'm trying to look at the process as a total adventure without getting wrapped up in the 'finality' of it all. I suspect I will continue to do what I am doing now in retirement--lots of tennis, travel, eating out, shows, walking, volunteering, etc, etc. God luck!
Thank you, EternalOptimist,

I like the adventure aspect. What gets on my way is the innate need to optimize time, effort, places, money, etc. Perhaps, I will lose this propensity when I retire.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
User avatar
Topic Author
VictoriaF
Posts: 19500
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by VictoriaF »

Dulocracy wrote:To the tax issue: if you plan on owning, Florida has a very high property tax vs. other states. If you do not plan on owning, Florida is in the top 10 places to retire considering taxes. So is Georgia.
Thank you Dulocracy,

I am not planning on owning. I rent now and I like the relative flexibility to move. One of the attractions of Florida is the absence of the state income tax, which most other states would impose on my Roth conversions.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
User avatar
Topic Author
VictoriaF
Posts: 19500
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by VictoriaF »

Mel Lindauer wrote:If you need a buzz, Victoria, Miami and Sarasota might be worth checking out (Miami for a huge and continuing buzz and Sarasota for a more moderate buzz).
Sarasota has been my primary focus. I have to check out Miami. Thank you, Mel.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
User avatar
Topic Author
VictoriaF
Posts: 19500
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by VictoriaF »

G12 wrote:Being that I grind my teeth over 6% state of GA income tax I would say your take is correct, especially if it is an almost virtual flat tax on income. Now if someone was 62 or older they would receive significant exemptions, over $130k on investment and retirement income if MFJ at 65. See sources of tax revenue below.

http://taxfoundation.org/article/where- ... -revenue-0

Another thing is property insurance could be significantly higher in FL if in a wind or sinkhole area. A sister in southern LA pays 3x more for HO insurance than we do in the ATL area on similar valued houses and we have better coverage.

I find people either really like FL or don't. The panhandle area is not all that different than ATL in the summer although it can be more humid, really dependent on how much rain is occurring in ATL. People of average health shouldn't have an issue being outdoors at 10AM unless the heat index is really bad on a given day. Other than some one off summer FL fishing trips that friends prefer to take at that time of year my wife and I strongly prefer winter trips to FL.
Thank you, G12,

As I mentioned I would like to save state income taxes on Roth conversions and as far as I know I can do it only in the states without income tax. I am not planning to buy anything, so that's not an issue.

If staying outdoors until 10am in summer is feasible, I don't see a problem with the weather.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
midmoder
Posts: 75
Joined: Mon Mar 18, 2013 10:27 am

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by midmoder »

I've lived in Orlando for 55 years and I can't wait to leave and go out west for several years once I retire. We'll spend winters in Arizona, New Mexico, and Florida.

I know I'm biased from growing up here (don't we always want what we don't have?) and I know that once I leave I'll look back and kick myself for not appreciating it more. But if we come back when we're ready to settle down again, it'll be to a coastal community where summer temps are slightly more moderate.

Winters are fantastic, that's not my complaint. It's the long (and getting longer every year) summers. Years ago, the nice weather would last well in May and by September temps would begin to moderate. Now? It's hot and humid from mid-April through October and sometimes into November. I know plenty of people who love the heat and humidity, but I'm not one of them. Don't let anyone kid you. Air conditioning is essential for many months of the year.

However, in 2012, I was in Virginia in June and it was well over 102 degrees! Much worse than Florida. It's just that in Florida, unlike Virginia, it lasts so dang long and is unrelenting. Once the hot temps come, they last EVERY SINGLE DAY for months and months. Not like other states where the temps can vary quite a bit even into summer.
User avatar
Topic Author
VictoriaF
Posts: 19500
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by VictoriaF »

swimirvine wrote:I'm young but hoping to retire early. I think some people retire early when they're financially independent and then actually continue to work but in the job they've always wanted (probably one which pays a lot less ... or nothing at all). You hear stories about Ph.D's that after working for Boeing for 30 years are now teaching HS physics ... not because they have to, but because they want to. I met a guy in Napa that worked for IBM for 20 years and retired at 45 or 50, moved to Napa and started a tour company. He loved wine and teaching people about wine. He told me he owned about 20k bottles of wine.

I see my retirement as being a little different. I'm hoping to retire around age 60 and have enough money to stay retired. My wife and I would like to travel for a few years and maybe not even keep a residence in the states during that time. Once we're tired of that, see our nest deteriorating too quickly or if we're physically unable to keep traveling, we'd settle down in the U.S. again and then I'd probably look for locums tenens positions. I'm a physician and we can sign up to cover for solo docs going on vacation for a week or two at a time. I say this because I love my job and the only reason I won't keep working forever is because of the limited vacation/travel time available to a full time doc.
Hi swimirvine,

My current situation is similar to the one you envision for yourself in the future. I could retire last April but had a reason to continue working until the end of the year. The end of the year is here, but there are a couple more things that I would like to try before I call it quits.

My initial interest in Florida was to use it as a winter base in conjunction with extensive summer travel. After many enthusiastic responses to my previous Florida thread, I stopped considering it as a part-time lodging and became interested in its social life.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
User avatar
Topic Author
VictoriaF
Posts: 19500
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by VictoriaF »

Mel Lindauer wrote:Living in Florida near the cruise ports allows Florida retirees to take advantage of last-minute super cruise deals offered to Florida residents.
That's actually a very good point. It's probably not only cruises but also many other travel opportunities that are catered to the Florida retirees at reduced prices. Thank you, Mel,

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
User avatar
Topic Author
VictoriaF
Posts: 19500
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by VictoriaF »

Peter Foley wrote:Victoria

Not to hijack your thread, but instead of thinking about what retirees do, perhaps one should think about what makes early retirees [in Florida and elsewhere] happy. If you can combine that with living in Florida, or if Florida contributes to that happiness, more power to Floridians. What follows is a paragraph from early draft on "life in retirement" that I wrote as part of the first chapter in the Boglehead's Guide to Retirement Planning. Bolles and Nelson Wrote What Color is your Parachute in Retirement and were the inspiration for this section of the first chapter.
Happiness is a fairly universal goal. Bolles and Nelson also examine happiness in retirement and describe approaches to happiness, pleasure, engagement and meaning, based on the scientific studies of Martin Seligman. Paraphrasing from their book:

Pleasure is the immediate positive reinforcement you get from doing something you like. Its duration is usually short, lasting as long as the activity itself. Enjoying a good meal, tasting a fine wine or hitting a good golf shot, are three examples of positive reinforcement resulting in very short term pleasure. Engagement is the happiness that results from losing yourself in something you are doing. The positive reinforcement often does not come until after you have finished. Engagement involves effort on your behalf to successfully overcome some challenge and it is likely that that additional reinforcement imprints the feeling of the experience more strongly and gives the resulting happiness a longer duration. Meaning is an approach to happiness that results from using your abilities in service to something larger than yourself. Common examples of service include actions done on behalf of family, friends, your community or a host of social or religious causes. The positive feedback from these pursuits is often amplified by the recognition of your efforts by others. This type of reinforcement can last a lifetime.
Peter, aka TLR
Peter,

Thank you for bringing up the general issue of happiness. I agree with you that much depends on one's own disposition and the role of the location is secondary. Still, I would like to visualize what my life in Florida would be like so that I would look forward to coming there.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
User avatar
Topic Author
VictoriaF
Posts: 19500
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by VictoriaF »

pryan wrote:
VictoriaF wrote:
Professor Emeritus wrote:members of our extended family have and sail boats, unlike the rich folk in Md who just own them
If I wanted to be a crew on someone boat, are there lessons?

Victoria
There is a very competitive Dragon Boat community in The Villages. Check it out.
Thanks. I don't think I would like living in a dedicated retirement community.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
User avatar
Topic Author
VictoriaF
Posts: 19500
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by VictoriaF »

Taylor Larimore wrote:
What are a day, a week, a month in the life of an early active retiree in Florida like?
Victoria:

I am a retiree living in Miami, Florida.

Today (Friday), I drove 20 miles north to Hollywood where I rented an electric bicycle (2 hours for $15) and had a hot-dog on the boardwalk. The 3 mile beach was filled with swimmers and sun-bathers. The temperature is about 80 degrees Fahrenheit.

Tomorrow morning (Saturday) I am registered to go sailboat racing on beautiful Biscayne Bay.

Sunday I plan to attend Art Basel.

This is what it is like for an active retiree.

Come to Miami and you can crew on my (rental) boat.

Best wishes.
Taylor
Hi Taylor,

Thank you very much for answering my original question. I would love to be a crew on your boat, but I need some training. Perhaps, I can take one of the classes you offer?

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
User avatar
Topic Author
VictoriaF
Posts: 19500
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by VictoriaF »

midareff wrote:We drove over to fort myers this afternoon for art and music night downtown. Joes Crab Shack was great for dinner ..... heading out for music soon.
Thank you, midareff. These are kinds of things I would like to be doing. Please say hello to your wife from me,

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
User avatar
Topic Author
VictoriaF
Posts: 19500
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by VictoriaF »

RadAudit wrote:
VictoriaF wrote:
Professor Emeritus wrote:members of our extended family have and sail boats, unlike the rich folk in Md who just own them
If I wanted to be a crew on someone boat, are there lessons?

Victoria
I would assume yacht clubs in FL are similar to those around here. Most (all) have weekly "fun races" that they use as recruiting events. Show up in a cute outfit and carry a 12 pack of beer and they'll find room on a boat for you.

If you show some ability - as in, you don't fall off the boat too easily - and interest, they'll teach you to crew. The key is showing up once you commit to crew on a boat that races. And, yes most clubs have lessons for newbies.
Sounds great, and the price of admission is perfect. I suppose, I would be sharing the 12-pack with the others; otherwise, I would be falling off the boat too easily,

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
User avatar
frugaltype
Posts: 1952
Joined: Wed Apr 24, 2013 9:07 am

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by frugaltype »

Andyrunner wrote:My parents are in their late 50s and moved down to Florida. My dad golfs 3-4 days a week. They also take 1-2 long vacations a year(3-4 weeks at a time).

Besides that, not to get political but they love conservitive politics so I believe they spend a lot of time listening to Rush L. and watching fox news.
I have a set of cousins who retired to Florida to the Villages. They fit the above description. It would drive me crazy.
Last edited by frugaltype on Fri Dec 06, 2013 7:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Topic Author
VictoriaF
Posts: 19500
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by VictoriaF »

orlandoman wrote:Been living in Orlando since 1977, retired since 2008.

Some activities have already been mentioned, in addition:
- I purchase an annual State Park pass every year, wife & I travel FL visiting them
- Look at http://www.myfairsandfestivals.com/ & find events to visit any anywhere, we visit art shows in various cities in FL
- Go to http://www.meetup.com/ & find groups that match your interest anywhere

Always something to do!
Thank you for the links. Living in Orlando, do you go to Disney?

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
User avatar
Topic Author
VictoriaF
Posts: 19500
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by VictoriaF »

The Wizard wrote:
VictoriaF wrote: Did you actually live in Florida or you were coming there for the winter? I think there is a difference between the two, because if you come for a short period of time you are motivated to use your time efficiently and you are not that interested in becoming a part of the local community. When you live in a place, you are probably more concerned about building local connections and less in a hurry to see interesting sites.

Victoria
No, never lived there; just a few weeks a year at most visiting the same place a few times per year.
So I tried to synthesize an answer based on that experience combined with my present no-so-early retirement.
I quit employment in March as you know and am now going into my first winter as a retiree.
We'll see if a cabin fever situation happens soon enough...
Thank you, The Wizard. It's interesting that now that you could live in Florida you are not considering it.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
User avatar
Topic Author
VictoriaF
Posts: 19500
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by VictoriaF »

midmoder wrote:I've lived in Orlando for 55 years and I can't wait to leave and go out west for several years once I retire. We'll spend winters in Arizona, New Mexico, and Florida.

I know I'm biased from growing up here (don't we always want what we don't have?) and I know that once I leave I'll look back and kick myself for not appreciating it more. But if we come back when we're ready to settle down again, it'll be to a coastal community where summer temps are slightly more moderate.

Winters are fantastic, that's not my complaint. It's the long (and getting longer every year) summers. Years ago, the nice weather would last well in May and by September temps would begin to moderate. Now? It's hot and humid from mid-April through October and sometimes into November. I know plenty of people who love the heat and humidity, but I'm not one of them. Don't let anyone kid you. Air conditioning is essential for many months of the year.

However, in 2012, I was in Virginia in June and it was well over 102 degrees! Much worse than Florida. It's just that in Florida, unlike Virginia, it lasts so dang long and is unrelenting. Once the hot temps come, they last EVERY SINGLE DAY for months and months. Not like other states where the temps can vary quite a bit even into summer.
I live in Maryland, and so I am also exposed to the summer heat, albeit for shorter periods. The summer mornings here are very pleasant, and the worst heat and humidity are in the late afternoon. Perhaps, I will develop a siesta habit during the times when I am not traveling.

Thank you,
Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
reisner
Posts: 466
Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2008 12:34 pm

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by reisner »

An issue to consider is whether you will like fitting the demographic, or not. The times after retirement that I have fit the gray-bearded demographic I didn't like it. In the several years I spent in Port Townsend, WA seeing a bald eagle was an everyday occurrence in our community, but a child was a rarity. I'm on Cape Cod now temporarily, where the property taxes are low because there are so few children. I don't like sitting at the bar of the Wicked Oyster and realizing the only person under sixty is the bartender.

On the other hand, if you move you'll want to make new friends, and that is probably easier to do amidst a homogeneous population of joint replacements.

Back to the first hand, when I visit my cousins in their NJ Pinelands retirement community and walk the bird dog around the neighborhood, the ubiquity of handicapped license plates darkens my day. I guess I like encountering people who feel they still have a purpose and goals and are not just resting on well-earned laurels while they wait for the god of their choice.

There is also the important question of whether you feel you have to be close to salt water, and how close. I fell in love with Sebastopol, CA but my wife said the ocean was too far away--twenty minutes. Currently I'm reconsidering it, as well as Charlottesville, VA and Asheville, NC and Portsmouth, NH (a no-tax state).

A connected thread for someone to start might have to do with where in Europe, or Asia, or South America folks want to spend those several months a year so many talk about. For me it used to be Greece, but after writing a book about the history of travel there I soured on the country but have yet to find a replacement.
midmoder
Posts: 75
Joined: Mon Mar 18, 2013 10:27 am

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by midmoder »

VictoriaF wrote:
orlandoman wrote:Been living in Orlando since 1977, retired since 2008.
Thank you for the links. Living in Orlando, do you go to Disney?

Victoria
I'll answer this one too. Never was a Disney fan, but I know many locals who have annual or seasonal passes and go frequently. We're considering purchasing seasonal passes next year ourselves because there is so much to do out there (4 parks, beautiful landscaping, Epcot events such as Food & WIne, restaurants, unparalleled people watching :) ). For many people, Disney is a big reason for living in or near Orlando.
User avatar
Qtman
Posts: 414
Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2008 8:00 pm
Location: Town with no name

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by Qtman »

Forget Florida, come to Colorado, bike, sail, hike, downhill and nordic ski. Best place on earth.

Been there done that in Florida.
Don’t wear yourself out trying to get rich; be wise enough to control yourself. | Wealth can vanish in the wink of an eye. It can seem to grow wings and fly away | like an eagle. - King Solomon
User avatar
Qtman
Posts: 414
Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2008 8:00 pm
Location: Town with no name

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by Qtman »

VictoriaF wrote:
midmoder wrote:I've lived in Orlando for 55 years and I can't wait to leave and go out west for several years once I retire. We'll spend winters in Arizona, New Mexico, and Florida.

I know I'm biased from growing up here (don't we always want what we don't have?) and I know that once I leave I'll look back and kick myself for not appreciating it more. But if we come back when we're ready to settle down again, it'll be to a coastal community where summer temps are slightly more moderate.

Winters are fantastic, that's not my complaint. It's the long (and getting longer every year) summers. Years ago, the nice weather would last well in May and by September temps would begin to moderate. Now? It's hot and humid from mid-April through October and sometimes into November. I know plenty of people who love the heat and humidity, but I'm not one of them. Don't let anyone kid you. Air conditioning is essential for many months of the year.

However, in 2012, I was in Virginia in June and it was well over 102 degrees! Much worse than Florida. It's just that in Florida, unlike Virginia, it lasts so dang long and is unrelenting. Once the hot temps come, they last EVERY SINGLE DAY for months and months. Not like other states where the temps can vary quite a bit even into summer.
I live in Maryland, and so I am also exposed to the summer heat, albeit for shorter periods. The summer mornings here are very pleasant, and the worst heat and humidity are in the late afternoon. Perhaps, I will develop a siesta habit during the times when I am not traveling.

Thank you,
Victoria
Your worst summer days in Maryland are 4 months + in Florida.
Don’t wear yourself out trying to get rich; be wise enough to control yourself. | Wealth can vanish in the wink of an eye. It can seem to grow wings and fly away | like an eagle. - King Solomon
User avatar
Topic Author
VictoriaF
Posts: 19500
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by VictoriaF »

reisner wrote:An issue to consider is whether you will like fitting the demographic, or not. The times after retirement that I have fit the gray-bearded demographic I didn't like it. In the several years I spent in Port Townsend, WA seeing a bald eagle was an everyday occurrence in our community, but a child was a rarity. I'm on Cape Cod now temporarily, where the property taxes are low because there are so few children. I don't like sitting at the bar of the Wicked Oyster and realizing the only person under sixty is the bartender.

On the other hand, if you move you'll want to make new friends, and that is probably easier to do amidst a homogeneous population of joint replacements.

Back to the first hand, when I visit my cousins in their NJ Pinelands retirement community and walk the bird dog around the neighborhood, the ubiquity of handicapped license plates darkens my day. I guess I like encountering people who feel they still have a purpose and goals and are not just resting on well-earned laurels while they wait for the god of their choice.

There is also the important question of whether you feel you have to be close to salt water, and how close. I fell in love with Sebastopol, CA but my wife said the ocean was too far away--twenty minutes. Currently I'm reconsidering it, as well as Charlottesville, VA and Asheville, NC and Portsmouth, NH (a no-tax state).

A connected thread for someone to start might have to do with where in Europe, or Asia, or South America folks want to spend those several months a year so many talk about. For me it used to be Greece, but after writing a book about the history of travel there I soured on the country but have yet to find a replacement.
What you described is one of the reasons for my message. But I don't want to emphasize purely demographic characteristics, because there are many older explorers and younger couch potatoes. And so my questions are more about the lifestyle than the age.

I don't have a particular interest in salt water, except that the weather is better closer to the beach. But if I learn to sail, being close to water may become a priority.

I go to Europe every summer for two weeks. A group I belong to meets every year in a different country, and so it's a great opportunity to explore different countries with real locals, i.e., not tour guides. I have friends in several European countries and would consider spending summers traveling around, except that the Schengen Agreement limits my stay in Europe to three months per year, and I would still have to experience the Florida heat.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
User avatar
Topic Author
VictoriaF
Posts: 19500
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by VictoriaF »

midmoder wrote:
VictoriaF wrote:
orlandoman wrote:Been living in Orlando since 1977, retired since 2008.
Thank you for the links. Living in Orlando, do you go to Disney?

Victoria
I'll answer this one too. Never was a Disney fan, but I know many locals who have annual or seasonal passes and go frequently. We're considering purchasing seasonal passes next year ourselves because there is so much to do out there (4 parks, beautiful landscaping, Epcot events such as Food & WIne, restaurants, unparalleled people watching :) ). For many people, Disney is a big reason for living in or near Orlando.
Thank you, midmoder.

As far as you know, is it feasible to live, for example, in Sarasota and periodically come to Disney for a day?

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
User avatar
Topic Author
VictoriaF
Posts: 19500
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by VictoriaF »

Qtman wrote:Forget Florida, come to Colorado, bike, sail, hike, downhill and nordic ski. Best place on earth.

Been there done that in Florida.
Thanks. I am particularly interested in Florida because of the absence of the state income tax, East Coast location, and retirement-friendliness. Of course, retirement-friendliness cuts both ways; retirement is both an abundance of time and opportunities and a count-down to slowing down, disability, and worse. I am trying to find the affinities with the former and not to worry about the latter yet.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
orlandoman
Posts: 522
Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 7:27 am

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by orlandoman »

VictoriaF wrote:
midmoder wrote:
VictoriaF wrote:
orlandoman wrote:Been living in Orlando since 1977, retired since 2008.
Thank you for the links. Living in Orlando, do you go to Disney?

Victoria
I'll answer this one too. Never was a Disney fan, but I know many locals who have annual or seasonal passes and go frequently. We're considering purchasing seasonal passes next year ourselves because there is so much to do out there (4 parks, beautiful landscaping, Epcot events such as Food & WIne, restaurants, unparalleled people watching :) ). For many people, Disney is a big reason for living in or near Orlando.
Thank you, midmoder.

As far as you know, is it feasible to live, for example, in Sarasota and periodically come to Disney for a day?

Victoria
- Never go to Disney
- Sarasota is a nice retirement area. Spent a good bit of time there on business before retirement. About a 2 1/2 hr drive to Orlando. Sarasota has an unexpected Amish community, know for some excellent homestyle restaurants.
"Don't Believe Everything You Think"
User avatar
G12
Posts: 1536
Joined: Mon Apr 16, 2007 2:35 pm

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by G12 »

VictoriaF wrote:Thanks. I am particularly interested in Florida because of the absence of the state income tax, East Coast location, and retirement-friendliness. Of course, retirement-friendliness cuts both ways; retirement is both an abundance of time and opportunities and a count-down to slowing down, disability, and worse. I am trying to find the affinities with the former and not to worry about the latter yet.
You'll be OK. You like to travel, new experiences and have interests in many different things. It's not a lifetime commitment unless you so choose. :wink:

I am with the poster who said NM/AZ as we are tired of heat AND humidity, but there are a lot worse places to live than where we currently are.
Gnirk
Posts: 1343
Joined: Sun Sep 09, 2012 3:11 am
Location: Western Washington

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by Gnirk »

caroljm36 wrote:I think my husband (who is retired) would like to move to Arizona but that would put us 1000 miles from his kids. Yet he likes seeing various family members who are mostly here or nearby. When I ask him, wouldn't you missing seeing (and helping) your kids? and he just shrugs.

Anyway, I gotta ask, don't people miss their families?
Yes, which is why I won't move away from the Puget Sound area. We are within 1 1/2 hour drive from all family members, except one son who moved to Virginia and loves it.
To get out of our wet, gray winters we have a small home in a retirement community in the Palm Desert, Ca area. We've been doing the snowbird thing for almost 14 years. We feel fortunate that we are able to have two homes, and it works for us.

And we do love those coupons for early-bird dinners. :wink:
midmoder
Posts: 75
Joined: Mon Mar 18, 2013 10:27 am

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by midmoder »

VictoriaF wrote:
midmoder wrote:
VictoriaF wrote:
orlandoman wrote:Been living in Orlando since 1977, retired since 2008.
Thank you for the links. Living in Orlando, do you go to Disney?

Victoria
I'll answer this one too. Never was a Disney fan, but I know many locals who have annual or seasonal passes and go frequently. We're considering purchasing seasonal passes next year ourselves because there is so much to do out there (4 parks, beautiful landscaping, Epcot events such as Food & WIne, restaurants, unparalleled people watching :) ). For many people, Disney is a big reason for living in or near Orlando.
Thank you, midmoder.

As far as you know, is it feasible to live, for example, in Sarasota and periodically come to Disney for a day?

Victoria
It certainly can be done, but It would be a very long day indeed when you add 4+ hours of driving on top of a day at the park.

Earlier this week, we went to the Grand Floridian Hotel for high tea and to see the Christmas decorations. (Our first time on Disney property in 10 years and you don't need an admission ticket to visit the hotels.) We chatted with a older mother/daughter pair (mother in her late 70s probably) who live in Port St Lucie. They visit about five times a year for several days at a time and stay on DIsney property. We calculated that together they spend at least 25-30k a year on these trips. But like so many, they LOVE everything Disney.

Rather than doing a day trip, much better to split the driving and the DIsney visit over two days. Drive up and spend time at Epcot and eat dinner there. Then stay overnight in an off-property hotel, go to the Magic Kingdom or Animal Kingdom the next day, then drive home.

There are good deals for Florida residents on multi-day park tickets.
rwm
Posts: 102
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 1:47 pm
Location: PA

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by rwm »

I think variety is the spice of life, and after spending a couple of winters and one summer month in Sarasota, I realized that it's not going to provide the variety I need at my current age of 63. For one thing, the topography is two-dimensional, i.e., flat. Secondly, it's too far from large cities of interest that can be reached by car in a few hours. I live in southern PA and I can get to DC, Philly, Pittsburgh and even NYC within a few hours. People say Sarasota is the cultural capital of Florida, but if this is the case then Florida is not for me. The weather is great during the winter months, but too hot and rainy for me in the summer. Florida may provide the variety that others need, but not for me.

I may change my mind as I get older. In the meantime it will be a place to visit in the winter months.

An older friend who lived part of her life in New England and part in Florida got it right when she said the ideal is having two homes: one in the north and one in Florida. True enough, if you can afford it.
atwood
Posts: 201
Joined: Wed May 27, 2009 11:57 pm

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by atwood »

For outdoor activities, in Jacksonville you have both an REI and Black Creek Outfitters that run all sorts of programs and trips for kayaking, paddle boarding, camping and hiking and the like. Local bike shops have regular rides. You mentioned Sarasota, so I'd look to see if there's anything similar there.

And since it is or was an artist's community of sorts, you could always take up painting or sculpting.
midmoder
Posts: 75
Joined: Mon Mar 18, 2013 10:27 am

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by midmoder »

Florida is fantastic for bird photography and bird watching, if you're into that kind of thing. (I am.) I wouldn't say it's a good hiking state though, and landscape photography blows unless you like sunsets. That's why I yearn to go west -- Utah, Colorado, Montana, Oregon.
RetiredIn2011
Posts: 41
Joined: Tue Nov 19, 2013 12:44 pm

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by RetiredIn2011 »

My mother retired to FL (Pompano Beach) in the early 70's at 58 years old. At first, she thought it was great. After having lived in NY, the weather was warm, the taxes were low, the pace was slow, the people were nice, things were great.

Over the years though, things were less rosy. The crime rate increased. The city services offered for older people are actually minimal compared to places where there are less old people (simple economics). The humidity and heat became oppressive in the summer. Upkeep on the house became a hassle.

At the age of 80 she relocated to Colorado. Years later, she said it was the best decision she ever made. Living on SS allowed her to move to a brand new HUD sponsored senior housing center. Her rent + utilities was pegged to 30% of her SS. She went to the Senior Center, enjoyed the senior lunches and celebrations, took trips with the center, and was surrounded by a group of friends that watched out for each other. Think college dorm except that everyone was 65 to 95.

The services that communities offer for seniors is based on what each city can afford. If you only have a few seniors, you can spend more per person. If you have lots of seniors, who's paying for it? No wonder FL has limited services.

The point I was trying to make, is that many people in the Northeast (where I grew up) assume that the best place to retire is FL. There's lots of other choices out there. Things aren't perfect out here in CO but I know of very few natives that choose to move to warmer climates. Sure, they may visit Phoenix or So. Cal. for a few weeks in January/February but by in large the weather really isn't that harsh. Three hundred days of sunshine a year. Of course, the last three days have been a beast. :)

Good luck with your choice, but take a look at Boulder Colorado. I don't live there, but it has a University with $30/semester auditing for any class by a senior, arts, theater, and other cultural events. Plus, the mass transit and senior services are very good. A bit off topic but thought I'd mention it.
Professor Emeritus
Posts: 2628
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2012 6:43 am

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by Professor Emeritus »

VictoriaF wrote:
Professor Emeritus wrote:members of our extended family have and sail boats, unlike the rich folk in Md who just own them
If I wanted to be a crew on someone boat, are there lessons?

Victoria
many if not all marinas offer not only lessons, but some kind of system where apprentice sailors can "learn the ropes" with members who need crew bodies. All skills are needed I am an experienced "on board" child watcher. (This is a very popular addition to the crew and saves me the usual tuition charge of Beer)

I did race sailboats as a student and I can"hand, reef and steer", splice a line , plot a course and sew a seam. Everything helps.
pinecrest
Posts: 678
Joined: Fri Feb 15, 2013 10:51 pm

.....

Post by pinecrest »

.....
Last edited by pinecrest on Mon Feb 24, 2014 5:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Code Commit
Posts: 138
Joined: Mon Mar 04, 2013 11:42 am

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by Code Commit »

Mel Lindauer wrote:I have friends doing 100-day round the world cruises and I'm booked for a 22-day river cruise in France. So retirement offers this kind of freedom.

Living in Florida near the cruise ports allows Florida retirees to take advantage of last-minute super cruise deals offered to Florida residents.
Mel, with comments like these, you are making young(er) folks like me, either day-dream or just work harder to get there earlier. :sharebeer
User avatar
Mel Lindauer
Moderator
Posts: 31206
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 8:49 pm
Location: Daytona Beach Shores, Florida
Contact:

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by Mel Lindauer »

Lots of talk about Florida's heat and humidity, but, as Victoria correctly stated, if you live in a coastal area like I do, you get the nice sea breeze and very little humidity, so even 90 degrees can be pleasant. Central Florida is another story.

If you want to talk real humidity, i lived in Philly for many years, and the humidity was stifling there in the summer. Give me a summertime Florida coastal location over a Philly summertime anytime. Folks in Philly can't wait for Friday to come so they can escape to the Jersey shore.
Best Regards - Mel | | Semper Fi
BillyG
Posts: 421
Joined: Sat Nov 17, 2012 9:02 pm
Location: Maryland, USA

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by BillyG »

Hi Victoria,

I lived in Florida for four years, in Melbourne Beach, and I enjoyed it. Some of the activities were sailing, boating, water skiing, wind surfing, fishing the inland waterways as well as offshore, running and going to the beach. I was working full time and going to school at night during 1984-1988. Sunday afternoon parties on the deck of low-key bars at the beach with reggae music...

You already know this but it isn't just "Florida." The Gulf and Atlantic coasts are very different, and things change as you go from North to South in Florida. Inland such as Orlando is different from the beach areas. The panhandle is different from the rest. And then there are the Keys and Key West. Although the panhandle is called "the redneck riviera" it has some of the prettiest sand in the world. The Gulf Coast beaches tend to have whiter sand and wider beaches, and you get sunsets looking West over the water. The Atlantic side is a bit wilder in terms of the weather and water and waves and people as a broad generalization.

It is wonderful to live and dress casually. Mel is right about the sea breezes near the coast. I highly recommend the coasts. There is activity inland around Orlando and Gainesville (U of F) but for me the coasts are where it's at.

Many of the cities are new. South Beach has some older art deco buildings but is very trendy and $$$ now. Tampa and St. Pete have some old sections. Ybor City is the old Cuban district in Tampa, and there are old cigar factories, good restaurants and street parties including Gasparilla festival and Guavaween (celebrated on Halloween).

There are hurricanes.

And there are hurricane parties.

Enjoy exploring and finding a place you like. Look on Tripadvisor and read the reviews of activities and restaurants. The activities on Tripadvisor will tend to be more tourist oriented but it still helps to see what is there.

I never went to Disney when I lived in Florida. Now I pay dearly to go.

Billy
jdb
Posts: 1676
Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2012 8:21 pm

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by jdb »

Andyrunner wrote:My parents are in their late 50s and moved down to Florida. My dad golfs 3-4 days a week. They also take 1-2 long vacations a year(3-4 weeks at a time).

Besides that, not to get political but they love conservitive politics so I believe they spend a lot of time listening to Rush L. and watching fox news.
As a long time resident of Florida not yet retired that is scary thought-not many things worse than retirees moving here and becoming passive political junkies regardless of ideology. So many things they could do to help themselves and community. You should suggest volunteering, whether reading for blind or homeless soup kitchen or local horticulture garden, anything to get them out of house and active and involved.
User avatar
Mel Lindauer
Moderator
Posts: 31206
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 8:49 pm
Location: Daytona Beach Shores, Florida
Contact:

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by Mel Lindauer »

jdb wrote:
Andyrunner wrote:My parents are in their late 50s and moved down to Florida. My dad golfs 3-4 days a week. They also take 1-2 long vacations a year(3-4 weeks at a time).

Besides that, not to get political but they love conservitive politics so I believe they spend a lot of time listening to Rush L. and watching fox news.
As a long time resident of Florida not yet retired that is scary thought-not many things worse than retirees moving here and becoming passive political junkies regardless of ideology. So many things they could do to help themselves and community. You should suggest volunteering, whether reading for blind or homeless soup kitchen or local horticulture garden, anything to get them out of house and active and involved.
Yes, there are countless volunteer opportunities available, and many retirees take advantage of them to do personally rewarding volunteer work in a field they really care about.
Best Regards - Mel | | Semper Fi
S&L1940
Posts: 1658
Joined: Fri Nov 02, 2007 11:19 pm
Location: South Florida

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by S&L1940 »

dickenjb wrote:they go out to dinner at 5 pm
Not the ones who really lead an active life. The early birds are the ones who have used up their energy playing canasta and Mah Jong and pinochle. The smart folk go out weeknights at 7.30-8.00 (after all, every night is Friday) to avoid the crowds and enjoy relaxed dining

The key to an active retirement is to be in a community of folks at the same stage and outlook on life as you.

If we are at the pool we are swimming laps.

Those that can stand it golf 3-4 times a week.

Tennis 5 days a week suits me just fine.

Florida is teeming with colleges & universities that offer diverse courses day and night.

One of the unique situations I have found is that you wind up with a whole new set of really close friends

Biking is great - thanks to the flat terrain - but I stick to bike trails as it is dangerous enough on the roads in a two ton vehicle with others by your side. Life gets real interesting when you insert a 30-40 pound two wheeler in among the typical Florida drivers who sometimes consider the bike lanes as their personal territory for passing or turn lanes- go figure...

Search some of Taylor's comments on the joys of the Florida sailing life

As other threads have suggested, spend some time in the area you are considering, rent for a month or so to see if the environment suits you.

Folks down here travel like crazy, Asia, Europe and a cruise in the Caribbean is on the same level as spending a day at the park up North.

Weather, up North you spend winters indoors for heat and summers indoors for cooling. Down here, play early to beat any adverse weather and then check the recent wine discussions at BH.org to find the perfect afternoon companion for beach or pool activities until you get to that preferred dinnertime - even if it is the 5.00 early bird special...

74 years old, been here ten years, went through three hurricanes of the century so far and just loving it.
Don't it always seem to go * That you don't know what you've got * Till it's gone
pinecrest
Posts: 678
Joined: Fri Feb 15, 2013 10:51 pm

.....

Post by pinecrest »

.....
Last edited by pinecrest on Mon Feb 24, 2014 5:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
mrpotatoheadsays
Posts: 223
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 2:36 pm

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by mrpotatoheadsays »

VictoriaF wrote: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?
Combat roaches and sweat like a pig.
letsgobobby
Posts: 12073
Joined: Fri Sep 18, 2009 1:10 am

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by letsgobobby »

Victoria, forget FL. The PCT is in Washington, also no income tax, and not a lot of ticks.

Camp out in Bellingham, Olympia, or a Seattle suburb, and be near the mountains, the ocean, great locavoring, and plenty of international culture. No, we don't have sunshine 364 days per year, but it's good for the soul to have some liquid sunshine now and then.
User avatar
GerryL
Posts: 2913
Joined: Fri Sep 20, 2013 11:40 pm

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by GerryL »

Frankly, I don't really care for the weather in Florida. My dad retired there. Bought a house ("double-wide") across the street from the golf course and either golfed or looked at the golf course. (Early in retirement he also did a little boating.)

I used to visit him and still travel to Florida (from West Coast) about once a year to volunteer at a great ape sanctuary in the center of the state, in the vicinity of Sebring. Snow birds and a few year-round resident retirees are among the volunteers who help out at the Center for Great Apes. Some go through the training to become docents. Some travel a significant distance to volunteer there once a month/week. It's such a wonderful facility. Not open to the public. Great volunteer opportunity if you love animals and happen to live in the area.

I was there last February. Froze. Went a few times in September. Ugh. Too, too hot and muggy. I only do it for the chimpanzees and orangutans. When I retire I hope to spend a bit more time there volunteering ... in spite of the weather.
eucalyptus
Posts: 712
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2007 1:24 pm

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by eucalyptus »

http://www.amazon.com/Finding-Florida-H ... ng+florida

and

http://www.amazon.com/Leisureville-Adve ... isureville


A newcomer to Florida, so FWIW - outdoor activities typical of ocean communities, from paddle boarding to diving to deep sea fishing to:

http://www.zapata-racing.com/en/flyboard/

The on the water community is of course huge and well serviced. Store your dinghy in a boat condo or dock your mega yacht at a special mega yacht yard

http://www.rybovich.com/

And activities you find everywhere, museums, botanical gardens, theater and concerts (hmmm - a local hall advertised Yanni recently)

http://www.boxofficeticketsales.com/tic ... ckets.aspx

The only buzz in this state, as far as I can tell, is found in the southeast with it's large Latin and South American communities. Jacksonville, Orlando, Tampa are just like their counterparts in other states. Oddly, St. Pete has

http://thedali.org/home.php

Though there are several major airports, flights to interesting elsewheres don't seem as plentiful as from DC, so you may miss that.

Much of SE Florida reminds me of Los Angeles, flat, endless residential communities, long streets with Mom and Pop business sprinkled in with the usual chains. As a whole, I find the state rather ugly and monotonous. Islands of affluence dot the SE coast and less frequently the interior. Not that there's much interior. Our general area seems to have an abundance of "gentlemen's clubs." SE Florida seems to have its share of sleaze. I found Maryland's DC suburbs oppresively tidy; I doubt many would feel that way about SE Florida and for me it's a great relief.

So, we walk, bike, take piano lessons, read, go to parties, and do things we'd do no matter where we lived, and we travel in the summer. But for the taxes, we'd live in coastal California.
S&L1940
Posts: 1658
Joined: Fri Nov 02, 2007 11:19 pm
Location: South Florida

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by S&L1940 »

pinecrest wrote:
BillyG wrote:
There are hurricanes.

And there are hurricane parties.
1530jesup wrote:
went through three hurricanes of the century so far and just loving it.
The mentions of hurricanes have been almost as if they were passing summer breezes. :D What are the practical meanings of hurricanes? Boarding up windows? Evacuations? Why the levity? Inquiring minds want to know!
seems we are gonna have adverse situations wherever we live. just find the Florida life that much better and worth the effort.
lately, any area of the country you name has been having their extreme challenges.

as they say, 'wherever you go there you are'. looking for the good life, we create our own environment and for me, Florida offers the right ingredients to live out the next 30 years the way I want to :sharebeer

may life be good to you, Rich
Don't it always seem to go * That you don't know what you've got * Till it's gone
User avatar
RooseveltG
Posts: 676
Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2008 2:56 pm
Location: The Rust Belt

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by RooseveltG »

We are snowbirds, early 60s, in our 5th winter in south Florida. We still spend half the year in our rust belt home city.

The Pros:
1. Amazing weather, clean air
2. No state income tax (we own a condo and are FL residents)
3. Excellent restaurants, although in our area they are fairly homogenous compared to a real city. (I miss the small Asian restaurants and more eclectic cuisines).
4. I golf very little and do not boat or sail, but you can do it here almost every day of the year.
5. My kids visit a lot more than they would if we were up north, especially in the winter. (Visiting us has become a vacation vs. just a family visit).
6. We have a stream of visitors all winter and I see my friends more (on an annual basis) when they stay with us than when we meet occasionally for dinner up north.
7. I have found the medical care to be excellent, at least in our area. In our part of FL, medicine has not been corporatized and you can call still call the office, get a convenient appointment and spend little time waiting.

The Cons:
1. We have found it difficult to make new friends or integrate into the community. My professional friends I used to have dinner with (when we visited FL) have their own lives and not really interested in having us as real friends in their own communities. You will probably have an easier time meeting new people if you live in a golf community. We live near the beach and it is more of a challenge.
2. I miss the running into old high school classmates, etc. that happens in your home town. I almost never see anyone I know in a store, restaurant, etc.
3. South Florida is fairly spread out and it can take time to get to a large box retailer (Best Buy, Home Depot, etc.). On the other hand, there is a Publix/CVS/Walgreens on every corner!
4. The same is true for cultural activities. Driving up to the Kravis Center is much more time consuming (with a smaller calendar of events) compared to cities with large cultural districts and many theaters.

I also assume that if we really lived in Florida 12 months a year, we would make more friends and find the social integration to be easier. The weather can't be beat, but as I tell my friends and family, "there is more to life than weather!"

Roosevelt.
l2ridehd
Posts: 258
Joined: Sat Sep 10, 2011 5:18 am

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by l2ridehd »

I live in Virginia close to DC. Summer here is very hot and very humid. I also own a home in The Villages Florida. I go there in every season. Summer in The Villages is not as hot or humid as Virginia. Yes it is hot and humid, but not as bad as Northern VA. And who every suggested property taxes are high in Florida has to be comparing to some place other then VA or DC. Mine are significantly lower in Florida. About 1/3 what they are in VA.

However, Victoria, do check out The Villages. It is an adult Disneyland or as one person recently told me "it's like a cruise ship not on the water". I go there for the golf. However my wife who does not golf loves it as well. There are over 2000 clubs that cover everything you could possibly ever want to do. Bike, swim, photography, paint, investments, travel, sailing, fishing, bridge, acting, cooking, etc etc. there is a club for anything and everything. And should it be missing, just start one. They have a college of lifelong learning with over 1000 courses every semester. Again covering any subject you want from language to pottery and only $5 to $15 a course. And all the doctors take Medicare. You can drive everywhere in your golf cart. Over a 100 restaurants, shopping centers, health care, and 3 town squares with shops and stores and every thing else a small town offers. There is live entertainment and dancing in all 3 town squares 365 nights a year. There is at least another dozen venues with live entertainment every night. They have 3 movie theaters with about 30 movie venues, and a live theater, a polo field, hospital, and you can get to it all in your golf cart. Many people do not even own a car and just rent a car when needed. And Hertz and Enterprise are both in a town squares. So far I never found anyone who did not love it there. I am sure there are, but I have never heard from them. I have heard some negative things from folks, but only from those who have never been there. There is a very active blog "talk of the villages" with over a 1.5 million hits a month that can provide additional insight.

So I highly recommend you check this place out if you have any interest at all in Florida. You can easily rent a place at this site "the villages 4 rent dot com" I personally own a home and two rental homes there and they have done extremely well. Both being rented and growing in value.
User avatar
frugaltype
Posts: 1952
Joined: Wed Apr 24, 2013 9:07 am

Re: What do early retirees actually do in Florida?

Post by frugaltype »

l2ridehd wrote: However, Victoria, do check out The Villages. It is an adult Disneyland or as one person recently told me "it's like a cruise ship not on the water". ...
So I highly recommend you check this place out if you have any interest at all in Florida.
I think they euthanize you if you aren't a member of political party X, however. Or maybe you wind up shooting yourself :-)

As for Colorado, are not the forests dying?

If I weren't tied to the family home, I'd look for a place near a university with reasonable cost community courses (Brown just discontinued theirs and they were too highly priced to begin with.) University towns are just bound to have lots of attractions close by. Nature easily accessible. Decent year round weather. Minimal weather disaster threats. Near a major teaching hospital. Reasonable taxes.
Post Reply