[Eating] Fish

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VictoriaF
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by VictoriaF » Tue Apr 22, 2014 8:49 pm

fatima526 wrote:
vital15 wrote:Try "Wild Planet" sardines
Agreed. These are great, I get the ones in water. They usually come 3 to a tin.
Fatima, do the tins have a ring for easy opening, or they require a can opener? I want to order them from Amazon.com, and they don't provide this information. Thank you,

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

fatima526
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by fatima526 » Tue Apr 22, 2014 9:02 pm

VictoriaF wrote: Fatima, do the tins have a ring for easy opening, or they require a can opener? I want to order them from Amazon.com, and they don't provide this information. Thank you,

Victoria
Hi Victoria. They have the ring, no can opener required!

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VictoriaF
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by VictoriaF » Tue Apr 22, 2014 9:04 pm

fatima526 wrote:
VictoriaF wrote: Fatima, do the tins have a ring for easy opening, or they require a can opener? I want to order them from Amazon.com, and they don't provide this information. Thank you,

Victoria
Hi Victoria. They have the ring, no can opener required!
Excellent! Thank you, Fatima,

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

protagonist
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by protagonist » Wed Apr 23, 2014 7:19 am

VictoriaF wrote:

I used to buy a lot of frozen Alaskan salmon at Trader Joe's. Do you know if it's authentic? Pacific Ocean seems less polluted than the Atlantic, and the Alaska's waters seem cleaner than those further South.
"A 2006 Consumer Reports study concluded 56 percent of the salmon marketed as wild is actually farmed."
http://www.montereycountyweekly.com/new ... 7fe7e.html

I eat the "wild" (hehe) smoked sockeye salmon ($17.99/lb) from Trader Joe's almost every morning. It tastes better and is cheaper than the smoked salmon at Stop and Shop so whatever. I can't test its DNA, and I would bet the CEO at TJ's is as clueless as I am. At least I am confident that the bread I eat it on is freshly baked. I watch Jonathan and Cheryl do that.

I have noticed that what is labeled as "Pacific" salmon tastes a lot better than "Atlantic" salmon, wherever I buy it. It's also a lot more expensive, at least here in New England. They almost give away "Atlantic salmon" (whatever it really is) in the supermarkets here.

vital15
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by vital15 » Wed Apr 23, 2014 7:39 am

VictoriaF wrote:
vital15 wrote:Try "Wild Planet" sardines which you can find at whole foods or on amazon. Best I've had.
Thank you, Vital. I found it on Amazon.com but the pictures show only the outer box. Do the cans have a ring for easy opening? Also, do you have any recommendations for choosing between sardines packed in oil and those packed in water.

Victoria
Yes, as was already answered, they have a ring. I like the ones packed in olive oil or olive oil and lemon the best.

texasdiver
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by texasdiver » Wed Apr 23, 2014 8:11 am

protagonist wrote:
VictoriaF wrote:

I used to buy a lot of frozen Alaskan salmon at Trader Joe's. Do you know if it's authentic? Pacific Ocean seems less polluted than the Atlantic, and the Alaska's waters seem cleaner than those further South.
"A 2006 Consumer Reports study concluded 56 percent of the salmon marketed as wild is actually farmed."
http://www.montereycountyweekly.com/new ... 7fe7e.html

I eat the "wild" (hehe) smoked sockeye salmon ($17.99/lb) from Trader Joe's almost every morning. It tastes better and is cheaper than the smoked salmon at Stop and Shop so whatever. I can't test its DNA, and I would bet the CEO at TJ's is as clueless as I am. At least I am confident that the bread I eat it on is freshly baked. I watch Jonathan and Cheryl do that.

I have noticed that what is labeled as "Pacific" salmon tastes a lot better than "Atlantic" salmon, wherever I buy it. It's also a lot more expensive, at least here in New England. They almost give away "Atlantic salmon" (whatever it really is) in the supermarkets here.
Almost all farmed salmon is Atlantic salmon, even if it is farmed in the Pacific. The 6 species of Pacific salmon are of a different genus then Atlantic salmon which is actually more closely related to brown trout than Pacific salmon. There have been limited attempts to farm raise Pacific salmon species (Chinook and Coho) but pretty much all the big commercial operations around the world use Atlantic salmon.

There are also very limited if any commercial wild fisheries for Atlantic salmon anymore.

What that means is that if the fish are properly labeled, then Pacific salmon species are almost certainly wild caught and Atlantic salmon is almost certainly farm raised.

protagonist
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by protagonist » Wed Apr 23, 2014 10:28 am

texasdiver wrote:
protagonist wrote:
VictoriaF wrote:

I used to buy a lot of frozen Alaskan salmon at Trader Joe's. Do you know if it's authentic? Pacific Ocean seems less polluted than the Atlantic, and the Alaska's waters seem cleaner than those further South.
"A 2006 Consumer Reports study concluded 56 percent of the salmon marketed as wild is actually farmed."
http://www.montereycountyweekly.com/new ... 7fe7e.html

I eat the "wild" (hehe) smoked sockeye salmon ($17.99/lb) from Trader Joe's almost every morning. It tastes better and is cheaper than the smoked salmon at Stop and Shop so whatever. I can't test its DNA, and I would bet the CEO at TJ's is as clueless as I am. At least I am confident that the bread I eat it on is freshly baked. I watch Jonathan and Cheryl do that.

I have noticed that what is labeled as "Pacific" salmon tastes a lot better than "Atlantic" salmon, wherever I buy it. It's also a lot more expensive, at least here in New England. They almost give away "Atlantic salmon" (whatever it really is) in the supermarkets here.


Almost all farmed salmon is Atlantic salmon, even if it is farmed in the Pacific. The 6 species of Pacific salmon are of a different genus then Atlantic salmon which is actually more closely related to brown trout than Pacific salmon. There have been limited attempts to farm raise Pacific salmon species (Chinook and Coho) but pretty much all the big commercial operations around the world use Atlantic salmon.

There are also very limited if any commercial wild fisheries for Atlantic salmon anymore.

What that means is that if the fish are properly labeled, then Pacific salmon species are almost certainly wild caught and Atlantic salmon is almost certainly farm raised.
Interesting. Thanks for the clarification. I used to commercial fish for salmon in Alaska in pre-farming days, but I wasn't aware of the distinction.

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Lon
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by Lon » Wed Apr 23, 2014 12:43 pm

I eat on a regular basis, Coho Salmon, Alabcore Tuna, Sardines, Halibut, Baramundi

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VictoriaF
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by VictoriaF » Wed Apr 23, 2014 12:57 pm

protagonist wrote:
texasdiver wrote:
protagonist wrote:
VictoriaF wrote:

I used to buy a lot of frozen Alaskan salmon at Trader Joe's. Do you know if it's authentic? Pacific Ocean seems less polluted than the Atlantic, and the Alaska's waters seem cleaner than those further South.
"A 2006 Consumer Reports study concluded 56 percent of the salmon marketed as wild is actually farmed."
http://www.montereycountyweekly.com/new ... 7fe7e.html

I eat the "wild" (hehe) smoked sockeye salmon ($17.99/lb) from Trader Joe's almost every morning. It tastes better and is cheaper than the smoked salmon at Stop and Shop so whatever. I can't test its DNA, and I would bet the CEO at TJ's is as clueless as I am. At least I am confident that the bread I eat it on is freshly baked. I watch Jonathan and Cheryl do that.

I have noticed that what is labeled as "Pacific" salmon tastes a lot better than "Atlantic" salmon, wherever I buy it. It's also a lot more expensive, at least here in New England. They almost give away "Atlantic salmon" (whatever it really is) in the supermarkets here.


Almost all farmed salmon is Atlantic salmon, even if it is farmed in the Pacific. The 6 species of Pacific salmon are of a different genus then Atlantic salmon which is actually more closely related to brown trout than Pacific salmon. There have been limited attempts to farm raise Pacific salmon species (Chinook and Coho) but pretty much all the big commercial operations around the world use Atlantic salmon.

There are also very limited if any commercial wild fisheries for Atlantic salmon anymore.

What that means is that if the fish are properly labeled, then Pacific salmon species are almost certainly wild caught and Atlantic salmon is almost certainly farm raised.
Interesting. Thanks for the clarification. I used to commercial fish for salmon in Alaska in pre-farming days, but I wasn't aware of the distinction.
I, too, avoid farmed salmon, when I know that it's farmed; and I, too, have some faith in Trader Joe's. And so my frozen Alaskan salmon appears to be fine. The problem is that right now I don't live near a Trader Joe's and get my groceries from Costco.

In general, I don't eat canned food, but recently I decided to reconsider some of it. I came across Bob Blum's web site and particularly his piece about nutrition. Blum, MD, PhD, is an MIT classmate and friend of Ray Kurzweil who is outspoken in his analysis and critique of Kurzweil's approach to longevity and reliance on supplements. Most Blum's opinions resonate with my own, and so I am more inclined to pay attention to him where my opinions are different, or I just don't have an opinion. Among his food recommendations, Bloom has sardines, herring, and salmon. He writes:
Bob Blum wrote:1) SARDINES, HERRING, SALMON
Rationale: They're tasty. Those cans of sardines or herring are cheap. They kill my appetite. Sardines and herring are not top predators like salmon, so they are far less apt to contain mercury or halogenated hydrocarbons. I do eat wild-caught salmon, but it's expensive (unless you buy the cans), and is more apt to contain mercury. I dislike the fact that eating salmon is not globally sustainable. I'm convinced that fish has been part of a hominin diet for millions of years.

Fatty fish are high in omega-3 fatty acids. With all that DHA, fish is pure brain food. Or, as my mother used to say, "fish is bene-fish-al."
After reading that, I became interested in canned fish, which has led to my earlier questions about it.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

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dm200
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by dm200 » Wed Apr 23, 2014 1:36 pm

Chicken of the Sea canned mackerel has become a regular part of the rotation of fish that I eat. It costs less then $2.00 for a can (about 15 oz.) at the local grocery store where I do much of my grocery shopping. The "details" on the label change - sometimes "Jack Mackerel", sometimes "Chub Mackerel" and sometimes just "Mackerel".

http://chickenofthesea.com/products/mackerel

protagonist
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by protagonist » Wed Apr 23, 2014 4:57 pm

VictoriaF wrote: I, too, avoid farmed salmon, when I know that it's farmed; and I, too, have some faith in Trader Joe's. And so my frozen Alaskan salmon appears to be fine. The problem is that right now I don't live near a Trader Joe's and get my groceries from Costco.

Victoria
I buy a lot of things at Trader Joe's but as far as fish goes, only the smoked salmon. I'm not that impressed with their other fish. I buy most of my fish- halibut, tuna, sea bass, mahi mahi- "fresh" (??) at the fish market a few blocks from my house. Exception: Stop n Shop sells frozen "wild Alaskan" (??) salmon, I think usually about $15-20/lb but often on sale for $10/lb. I eat it at least once a week , seared carpaccio (30 secs-1 min/side)- different preparations (sometimes I coat it with herbs depending on what I have fresh, sometimes zaatar.....often I marinate it in Trader Joe's "Island Soyaki" and add lemon, ginger and wasabi - yum).....serve it on a bed of salad. It is always delicious, tastes very fresh, never any "fishy" smell. I'm surprised how consistently good it is.

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dm200
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by dm200 » Wed Apr 23, 2014 5:54 pm

As, I believe, I may have stated before - I also regularly eat Costco's "Wild Alaska Salmon Burgers". The burgers are 1/4 pound, frozen and do not have bread (or similar) filler. As far as I can tell, these are a very good and healthful value - and taste very good as well!

stoptothink
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by stoptothink » Wed Apr 23, 2014 6:08 pm

dm200 wrote:As, I believe, I may have stated before - I also regularly eat Costco's "Wild Alaska Salmon Burgers". The burgers are 1/4 pound, frozen and do not have bread (or similar) filler. As far as I can tell, these are a very good and healthful value - and taste very good as well!
They are parfried in a mixture of soy and canola oil.

rayout
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by rayout » Wed Apr 23, 2014 6:24 pm

Recently found out walmart has farmed mussels for a little over $2/lb in my area. Comes in a 2 lb bag, pre-cooked. Just poke some holes in the bag, microwave for 5 minutes and add to a dish or just enjoy with some butter. Great for an easy, nutritious meal: http://www.walmart.com/ip/Fishin-Mussels-2-Lb/14654146

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CommonCent$
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by CommonCent$ » Sun Jan 31, 2016 7:10 am

Munchkin Man wrote:Greetings:

There were many years when the Munchkin Man never ate fish.

The Munchkin Man didn't like fish.

The Munchkin Man has since learned to like fish.

The Munchkin Man now eats some type of fish every week.

The Munchkin Man enjoys a can of the 365 brand Wild Alaskan Red Sockeye Salmon for lunch twice a week.

The Munchkin Man buys this brand at the Whole Foods Market.

It goes well with sliced jalapeno peppers and a slice of whole grain bread with Trader Joe's hummus.

The Munchkin Man's favorite local restaurant offers a "fresh catch" chef's special every weekend.

That is what the Munchkin Man always orders.

In recent weeks these specials have included Alaskan halibut, wild red salmon, tile fish, and rockfish.

They have all been outstanding.

The Munchkin Man is now in the process of learning more about sushi.

The Munchkin Man has recently joined a sushi lover's social club.

They go out to a different sushi restaurant about twice a month.

This will help the Munchkin Man learn more about sushi and make some new friends as well.

The Munchkin Man is very glad that the Munchkin Man learned to like fish.

Bon Appetit!

Munchkin Man
Dear Munchkin Man,

I am curious if the Munchkin Man ever learned to fish after the Munchkin Man learned to like fish?

Thank You Munchkin Man

CS$
NNN = "Nobody Knows Nothing"

protagonist
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by protagonist » Sun Jan 31, 2016 7:59 am

If the fish market near you sells good, fresh fish, I would just experiment. Try it all and see what you like best. You will be able to establish a relationship with the owner who can advise you as to what looks best on any given day, you will be supporting your local economy, and you may find you get better fish, especially if you live somewhere where he has access to local catch. The downside is it may be a bit more expensive than the supermarket. I would think it would be cheaper than Whole Foods. At least that is the case where I live. The markups at Whole Foods seem exhorbitant, especially considering the volume they receive.

I shop at my local fish market most of the time (halibut, tuna, salmon, whatever looks good), though I also buy frozen, (allegedly) wild Alaskan salmon from Stop and Shop, which has always been delicious and is often on sale. The easiest thing to do with it is sear it for a minute or so on each side in some herbs and olive or canola oil (I also use zaatar from time to time) and slice it thin on top of a salad with lemon or a homemade vinaigrette. Very healthy if you don't heat the oil above its smoke point. Poaching in white wine and herbs is also very healthy and delicious if the fish is fresh.

protagonist
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by protagonist » Sun Jan 31, 2016 8:09 am

protagonist wrote:If the fish market near you sells good, fresh fish, I would just experiment. Try it all and see what you like best. You will be able to establish a relationship with the owner who can advise you as to what looks best on any given day, you will be supporting your local economy, and you may find you get better fish, especially if you live somewhere where he has access to local catch. The downside is it may be a bit more expensive than the supermarket. I would think it would be cheaper than Whole Foods. At least that is the case where I live. The markups at Whole Foods seem exhorbitant, especially considering the volume they receive.

I shop at my local fish market most of the time (halibut, tuna, salmon, whatever looks good), though I also buy frozen, (allegedly, though I don't believe it) wild Alaskan salmon from Stop and Shop, which has always been delicious and is often on sale. The easiest thing to do with it is sear it for a minute or so on each side in some herbs and olive or canola oil (I also use zaatar from time to time) and slice it thin on top of a salad with lemon or a homemade vinaigrette. Very healthy if you don't heat the oil above its smoke point. Poaching in white wine and herbs is also very healthy and delicious if the fish is fresh.

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blueblock
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by blueblock » Sun Jan 31, 2016 8:10 am

Last week we lucked upon a hefty, fresh steelhead trout fillet and baked it. Absolutely delicious.

I also love walleye, coated in pistachio "flour"--we have an old electric coffee grinder dedicated to this purpose--and baked with a pat of butter.

Ninnie
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by Ninnie » Sun Jan 31, 2016 8:57 am

Another common point of fraud in the grocery stores is "wild" shrimp, particularly from the Gulf.

In fact, 30% were found to be farm-raised in a recent look at the problem.
http://www.motherjones.com/tom-philpott ... ild-caught

I came across this because I got very sick from a few batches of "wild" Gulf shrimp from Whole Foods, which were, in fact, not wild at all. Without going off-topic into my medical condition (happy to PM anyone that's curious) my body's reactions are a reliable litmus test for wild versus raised shrimp and other fish.

I eat wild salmon, haddock, cod, squid, oysters and scallops. And shrimp when I can be sure of it.

cherijoh
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by cherijoh » Sun Jan 31, 2016 9:17 am

dm200 wrote: I am NO general expert on kids, but with food issues, sometimes it is what you call something that makes the most difference to kids. Many years ago, when our son was very young, we would have liver (I think beef) from time to time. Our son would turn up his nose and refuse to eat it. "Liver - YUK!!!"

So, one day my wife cut the liver into small cubes, cooked it and told our son at dinner these were "Liver NUGGETS" . He quickly gobbled them up, with a smile on his face! :wink:

Maybe Fish "Nuggets" (or whatever is the IN thing these days.
Very creative solution! :happy

Fish tacos are really popular where I live and might go over well with the kids.

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