Piano purchase

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Elysium
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Piano purchase

Post by Elysium » Mon Jun 24, 2013 7:39 pm

I am purchasing a Piano for my son who has been learning for the past 20 months. We are renting currently at $60 a month. We will get credit for 6 months rent towards the purchase from the same shop. We narrowed it down to a Cristofori which is the JKM house brand I believe. Not knowing much about a Piano was hard, but after listening to the sound of various pianos in the shop at various price ranges, this one sounded more than good enough for the money we intend to spend. They are offering $3200 for an upright traditional Cristofori in Cherry finish. Does anyone here have experience with this particular brand and is the price about right?

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tainted-meat
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by tainted-meat » Mon Jun 24, 2013 7:43 pm

You might check out Craigslist, there are a lot of free ones (at least where I am) if you're willing to pick it up.

lethean46
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by lethean46 » Mon Jun 24, 2013 7:54 pm

I would look for a used Baldwin Acrosonic piano manufactured in the 50s, 60s, maybe 70s. Baldwin was sold at some point in time to a much bigger company. You might be able to find the year with a google search. I would avoid Acrosonics after the sale date.

Consider the rent money a sunk cost. My recommendation is an older Acrosonic by Baldwin. Wonderful sound and touch. I have seen them advertised for sale, but I forget the price range. Not cheap. But nowhere near $3200. Music people appreciate the older Acrosonics and the price reflects a quality product.

Good luck.

justus
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by justus » Mon Jun 24, 2013 8:02 pm

Diaharder,

Pianoworld is the forum I'd use to ask about individual piano brands. http://www.pianoworld.com/forum/ There's a lot of great information about what to know, what not to know, and how not to get ripped off.

Daniel

Dave76
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by Dave76 » Mon Jun 24, 2013 8:18 pm

lethean46 wrote:I would look for a used Baldwin Acrosonic piano manufactured in the 50s, 60s, maybe 70s. Baldwin was sold at some point in time to a much bigger company. You might be able to find the year with a google search. I would avoid Acrosonics after the sale date.

Consider the rent money a sunk cost. My recommendation is an older Acrosonic by Baldwin. Wonderful sound and touch. I have seen them advertised for sale, but I forget the price range. Not cheap. But nowhere near $3200. Music people appreciate the older Acrosonics and the price reflects a quality product.

Good luck.
I'll second that. The Acrosonic is probably the best spinet piano ever made. Spinets are sneered at in the piano world, but it'll probably be good enough for your son's needs. Avoid the later Baldwins made in Asia. Pianos made from the 1920s to the 1960s are the best. I've seen old Acrosonics priced from $400-$800.

lethean46
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by lethean46 » Mon Jun 24, 2013 9:07 pm

I was told years ago - that a test was administered to piano teachers. They listened to Baldwin pianos being played but did not actually see the pianos. I believe I remember that those teachers chose the Baldwin Acrosonic over the Baldwin baby grand. IOW, they were comparable.

I grew up playing a Baldwin Acrosonic. My favorite. I now have a Steinway console, and it is very disappointing in both sound and touch. A big mistake made years ago. It's far inferior to the Baldwin Acrosonic. I cannot vouch one way or the other for the Baldwin console. My only exposure to that model (console) was a piano that I didn't like nearly as much as the Acrosonic (spinet).

Sometimes a good source for used pianos can be an old established piano tuner with many clients. He knows who is interested in upgrading and who might want to sell. Sometimes you can find them advertised in estate sales or tag sales. In our town, the tag sale people have a Baldwin Concert Grand piano (not baby grand) that didn't sell at the tag sale. It's still for sale. Price. $25,000. "Used". I forget the age. But probably decades old.

Pianos do not improve with age. But their good life span is about 100 years, I think. All to say, a piano does not become more expensive as it ages. But the instruments remain fine. More than fine.

lethean46
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by lethean46 » Mon Jun 24, 2013 9:30 pm

Here's the history of the Baldwin Piano Company. Interesting. First BK was in 1983. Were they cheapening the product prior to BK? Who knows. Therefore, I'd stick with pianos from the 50s, 60s, or 70s.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baldwin_Piano_Company

michaelsieg
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by michaelsieg » Mon Jun 24, 2013 9:37 pm

Dieharder
The price seems about right. Just checked the piano website referenced by justus, there are discussions about Cristofori pianos and opinions vary widely. (Amazing how uncivilized the discussuions get if there is no LadyGeek reminding people about having a civil tone...)
I would say, if you like the sound of the piano, I would go for it, the price seems to match what other people pay on the piano forum. Eventually if your son becomes advanced, you could consider upgrading to a Balwin or a Steinway, but it is too early for a large expense.
Just if you are interested, the original Cristofori probably invented the modern piano hammer mechanism- his original pianos are all in museums, here is some interesting information - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bartolomeo_Cristofori - obviously the piano you are looking at is made in have nothing to do with these antique ones.
I got a used upright Steinway from the 1930s a few years ago, absolutely love to tone and the mechanics, but paid much more than 3k. Still probably one of the best "investments" I have made.

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frugaltype
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by frugaltype » Tue Jun 25, 2013 12:07 am

Somewhere I read recently about there being so many surplus pianos that anyone wanting to get rid of one would find it headed to the junk yard. There was some website trying to find a home for pianos, with photos and so on.

This seems to be one website http://pianoadoption.com/

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RedJunglefowl
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by RedJunglefowl » Tue Jun 25, 2013 12:41 am

Get a nice digital piano such as the Yamaha P-95 which you can get for about $1300. Add in a sustain pedal and an una corda pedal for a bit more (and if necessary a sostenuto pedal) and you will have something that sounds really good and has nice touch for a fraction of the price of any piano that would sound or feel better. Also you save money on tuning, don't have to worry about humidity or breaking strings, and get the ability to record practice easily to give the performance feeling.

kayman
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by kayman » Tue Jun 25, 2013 1:31 am

Professional pianist here. I'm going to second the advice on a digital keyboard. A Yamaha P-105 or P-155 can be had for less than $1000, maybe even half that. Musician's Friend often has used or restock models and will ship them for free. The sound is excellent, and they are fully-weighted 88-key keyboards. Also, unlike with pianos, the volume can be turned down or your son can practice with headphones! (trust me, you will be grateful for this when he starts his Hanon exercises)

If you definitely want an acoustic piano, I would think of the make as a starting place but focus more on a piano that sounds and feels good to you/your son. There is tremendous variety from piano to piano, so don't get too hung up on the name.

That said, I can give you some general advice. I prefer a warm sound. There are some nice Baldwins, but I often find them to be a bit bright. Older Yamahas are also often bright, though newer ones (in the last 10-20 years) are much warmer and have a very smooth action. Kawais are very similar. I am not a fan of upright pianos - you get the high price tag, backache, tuning costs, and not a great sound for it. But if you are leaning that way (for space reasons) definitely look at the Yamahas.

I hope that helps. As a budget-conscious person, I think a keyboard is the best option. You'll save a fortune on moving and tuning costs. (very pricy!) There is always the chance that your son decides he doesn't want to play anymore in a year or two. Or, if he sticks with it and starts playing gigs, he'll have a nice keyboard that he can bring with him!

Dave76
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by Dave76 » Tue Jun 25, 2013 10:56 am

kayman wrote:Professional pianist here. I'm going to second the advice on a digital keyboard.
But a digital electronic keyboard cannot match the sound and feel of the real thing. For instance, the sound volume on an electronic keyboard stays the same whether you press down hard on the keys or press down softly. I think his son would be better off experiencing the key dynamics of a real piano, especially in this beginner stage.

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matjen
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by matjen » Tue Jun 25, 2013 11:29 am

I have done a little bit of research on this topic because I may get something for my wife eventually. It seems that digital is the way to go these days unless you have huge space and a large budget. This WSJ article is right on point. A professional tried a bunch out.

"Ms. Dinnerstein was pleased, however, with the Yamaha CLP-480 (about $5,600, yamaha.com ). "The way it sustains is much more similar to a piano," she said. "It has a lot of variety of touch and sound. I like this one." Her only complaint: The keys were too stiff. "But you could say the same about an acoustic piano; some are a bit brutal in how they make you play," she said."

"Ms. Dinnerstein started on the AvantGrand N2 (about $12,000), an upright piano with the action and sound of a grand. "I think this is kind of amazing actually. I could probably be fooled that this was a real piano," said Ms. Dinnerstein. "There's something a little bit freaky about it—but I love it. I would definitely consider having one of these."

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142 ... 32956.html

She can play: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EpqT_mJ0vK4
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Dave76
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by Dave76 » Tue Jun 25, 2013 11:41 am

matjen wrote:I have done a little bit of research on this topic because I may get something for my wife eventually. It seems that digital is the way to go these days unless you have huge space and a large budget. This WSJ article is right on point. A professional tried a bunch out.

But you don't need a lot of space and money. My parents had a spinet in the dining room of their Sears pre-fab house. You can get one for under $1k. Generations of people across all socio-economic strata have learned on real pianos. Why should your wife deserve less? Besides, the value of digital pianos drops like a brick. And repairs can be costly if it stops working.

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interplanetjanet
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by interplanetjanet » Tue Jun 25, 2013 11:47 am

lethean46 wrote:Pianos do not improve with age. But their good life span is about 100 years, I think. All to say, a piano does not become more expensive as it ages. But the instruments remain fine. More than fine.
It really depends on how they are maintained and used. Hammers wear down and need to be resurfaced. Strings (especially bass strings) suffer from age and have a finite life. Soundboards lose some of their flex and crown. Action parts wear.

It's entirely possible for a piano to give a century of good service, but much like with a car you need to stay on top of maintenance. Most older upright pianos tend to have not been maintained to a high standard and both the sound and action will suffer with time, and it's seldom worth putting the money into them to bring them back to good operating condition - you will not make your money back when you sell, and you'll get better value for your money by buying a newer instrument in better shape. There are exceptions, certainly - older Steinway uprights being one of them.

Whatever the OP seriously considers buying, I would have a technician (not just a tuner) do an evaluation of. Techs see many people buy instruments on their last legs without realizing it and will usually examine instruments for very reasonable fees.

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interplanetjanet
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by interplanetjanet » Tue Jun 25, 2013 11:50 am

kayman wrote:If you definitely want an acoustic piano, I would think of the make as a starting place but focus more on a piano that sounds and feels good to you/your son. There is tremendous variety from piano to piano, so don't get too hung up on the name.
You bring up something most other people aren't focusing on, the feel of the action.

It's nice to have an instrument with a beautiful tone, but when learning it's important to have an action that's responsive and *feels* good. Never choose an instrument just on sound. If it takes too much work to get that lovely sound, if dynamic shading is difficult to accomplish...playing it will be frustrating.

lightheir
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by lightheir » Tue Jun 25, 2013 12:33 pm

Don't know if you're wedded to an acoustic piano, but Yamaha electric pianos are very nice, not expensive, and have realistic feel and sound that's very, very hard to criticize.

Some of the huge plusses of these electrics:
- Headphones (!)
- Built in metronome
- Library of piano songs built in to enjoy (a surprisingly nice feature even if you're a stalwart player)
- Built in easy self-recording (REALLY helpful for analyzing your playing as your learn)
- Never goes out of tune!
- Hammer action is weighted, realistic. Do not fall for buying a cheaper e-piano that does not have properly 'weighted keys' that truly mimic a true acoustic piano if you are learning piano.

And a key feature not to be underestimated:
- LIGHTWEIGHT compared to regular pianos. My digital piano weighs 85 lbs fully assembled, and when I bought it used, disassembled within 30-40 minutes to fit into the backseat of a Honda Civic 4 door. Because of this small weight and footprint, it's been able to come with me through 3 moves without issue. If you sell it (pretty easy to do on Craigslist if the price is right), this ease of transport makes a huge difference.

As you can see, I love my digital piano.

FWIW - While I'm not a concert pianist, it wasn't my primary instrument - I was a conservatory-level musician on a different classical instrument, and thus I think I can judge fairly well whether an e-piano isn't up to par (some def are not.)
Last edited by lightheir on Tue Jun 25, 2013 12:55 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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matjen
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by matjen » Tue Jun 25, 2013 12:37 pm

Dave76 wrote:
matjen wrote:I have done a little bit of research on this topic because I may get something for my wife eventually. It seems that digital is the way to go these days unless you have huge space and a large budget. This WSJ article is right on point. A professional tried a bunch out.

But you don't need a lot of space and money. My parents had a spinet in the dining room of their Sears pre-fab house. You can get one for under $1k. Generations of people across all socio-economic strata have learned on real pianos. Why should your wife deserve less? Besides, the value of digital pianos drops like a brick. And repairs can be costly if it stops working.
Well because it is 2013. I feel this is much like the debate about digital vs. film 10+ years ago. This article goes into much more detail about the quality and advantages of a good digital piano including the physical keyboard. This is no mere synthesizer.

"I’m not a concert pianist, so I tend to play a lot of mediocre grands and uprights. The world is full of mediocre pianos, of course, largely because people (or institutions like universities without climate-controlled practice rooms) don’t practice good maintenance. It can get expensive keeping a decent upright or grand in tip-top shape, tuning, regulating, voicing and humidifying things. It’s worth bearing that in mind when talking about something like the AvantGrand. What are we comparing it to? A perfectly maintained $50,000 to $100,000 piano or more of an entry-level acoustic grand?

The AvantGrand N2 sells anywhere from $8,000 to $10,000 depending on dealer discounts. While I’d argue it offers a reasonable approximation of what various higher-end pianos can do sound-wise, we shouldn’t get so tangled in the academic debate over sample fidelity that we forget where it slots price-wise. In the $8,000 to $10,000 range, what you’re getting is the best acoustic piano action money can buy (found in acoustics priced twice as much, and superior to any upright if you’re looking for a grand feel) with a piano sound reproduction system that rivals the best piano sample libraries if you’re thinking about it in holistic “just sitting in a room playing” terms.

http://techland.time.com/2013/01/23/mos ... ear-later/
Last edited by matjen on Tue Jun 25, 2013 12:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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lightheir
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by lightheir » Tue Jun 25, 2013 12:38 pm

Dave76 wrote:
kayman wrote:Professional pianist here. I'm going to second the advice on a digital keyboard.
But a digital electronic keyboard cannot match the sound and feel of the real thing. For instance, the sound volume on an electronic keyboard stays the same whether you press down hard on the keys or press down softly. I think his son would be better off experiencing the key dynamics of a real piano, especially in this beginner stage.
BIG distinction between a digital piano (like the Yamaha kayman mentioned) vs electronic keyboards that aren't 'electric pianos.'

What you're describing is a electric keyboard, more akin to a synthesizer device for which the key action is often irrelevant so not emphasized (the sounds are usually heavily synthesized with these instruments, more for bands.)

For an electric piano like the Yamahas mentioned above, the hammer action of the keys is near-identical to a real piano. In some cases, BETTER than a real piano, especially if the real piano hasn't been maintained properly. The Yamahas are so good tonally that they even capture the subtle reverberations of different key combinations, and even change in accent if you hit it soft vs hard. It's a much more sophisticated and refined instrument for pure piano playing that an electric keyboard.

I have an older Yamaha model YDP-223(discontinued) http://usa.yamaha.com/products/musical- ... mode=model, which looks like an upright piano which I got used for $1000 a few years back, and it's been awesome. You can get similar deals on Craigslist pretty readily nowadays in most areas. And as said, these units almost all fit into the backseat of a compact car if you disassemble the stand.

Puakinekine
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by Puakinekine » Tue Jun 25, 2013 12:50 pm

Our story. We bought a used Baldwin Acrosonic about 12 years ago for a very fair price. Even at that time, people were saying an electronic keyboard would be better, but, like the OP, I wanted a real piano for the kids to learn on. I believe that the cost of moving it into the house was about $400 at the time. Tuning started off at about $80 per 6 month visit and is now about $100 every six months. The kids used it on a daily basis. Their friends, who had electronic keyboards at home, came over to use it and it was great fun to listen to them all. We got our money's worth and more out of it. But now, it is twanging a bit and is well past it's prime. The kids are gone and it is not played. We need to get rid of it. I think I will have to end up donating it to the local high school and have to pay for the moving, which will be expensive but, I guess, part of the deal.

To me it was all worth it. We got our money's worth out of it, just as my daughter did with the more expensive oboe that we bought for her. Oboes also have a short shelf life (shorter actually) but are much more portable. :D

Just try and find a place for it, where it can be easily moved in and out.

lightheir
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by lightheir » Tue Jun 25, 2013 1:05 pm

Here's actually a neat article from WSJ with a concert pro pianist testing out a bunch of e-pianos.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142 ... 32956.html

Interestingly, she actually deems acceptable the cheapest Casio Privia for hammer action (less so on sound) at the end of the article. Surprising, as I would have expected the keytouch to be the first to suffer with the cheaper models.

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Flobes
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by Flobes » Tue Jun 25, 2013 1:09 pm

First: kudos to you for encouraging music and giving lessons and a piano to your son. He may or may not always play, but he will always harbor an affection and appreciation for music in his soul... which is a life gift.

My suggestion: call a few local piano tuners and/or technicians. They are a hotline resource for local used pianos. They help families buy, sell and trade pianos. And they know which pianos do and don't fare well, with different players, in various conditions and climates.

BTW: I bought my baby baby (4') grand used, from a classified ad in the local newspaper, for $1000. It turned out to be the family piano of a Grammy-winning famous musician (not piano), and so I own an instrument with provenance. It is much easier to move than my previous upright.

As others have said, there are many many lovely pianos that are available for adoption. In my family, we had to put some effort into finding new homes for both my mother's and my aunt's pianos.

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matjen
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by matjen » Tue Jun 25, 2013 1:30 pm

lightheir wrote:Here's actually a neat article from WSJ with a concert pro pianist testing out a bunch of e-pianos.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142 ... 32956.html

Interestingly, she actually deems acceptable the cheapest Casio Privia for hammer action (less so on sound) at the end of the article. Surprising, as I would have expected the keytouch to be the first to suffer with the cheaper models.
See above!!! Beat you to it. :P
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RedJunglefowl
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by RedJunglefowl » Tue Jun 25, 2013 3:16 pm

Dave76 wrote:
kayman wrote:Professional pianist here. I'm going to second the advice on a digital keyboard.
But a digital electronic keyboard cannot match the sound and feel of the real thing. For instance, the sound volume on an electronic keyboard stays the same whether you press down hard on the keys or press down softly. I think his son would be better off experiencing the key dynamics of a real piano, especially in this beginner stage.

That isn't correct. Good digital pianos such as the ones being recommended in this thread are just that –– pianos. They mimic the feel of an acoustic piano and surpass the feel of cheap acoustic pianos. They have velocity sensitive keys so if you press harder the note will sound louder, just like an acoustic piano. To get something that feels or sounds better than a good digital piano will cost twenty times as much.

Dave76
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by Dave76 » Tue Jun 25, 2013 4:18 pm

RedJunglefowl wrote:
Dave76 wrote:
kayman wrote:Professional pianist here. I'm going to second the advice on a digital keyboard.
But a digital electronic keyboard cannot match the sound and feel of the real thing. For instance, the sound volume on an electronic keyboard stays the same whether you press down hard on the keys or press down softly. I think his son would be better off experiencing the key dynamics of a real piano, especially in this beginner stage.

That isn't correct. Good digital pianos such as the ones being recommended in this thread are just that –– pianos. They mimic the feel of an acoustic piano and surpass the feel of cheap acoustic pianos. They have velocity sensitive keys so if you press harder the note will sound louder, just like an acoustic piano. To get something that feels or sounds better than a good digital piano will cost twenty times as much.
But the keys are too light. They're not adequate for building finger strength.

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Re: Piano purchase

Post by lightheir » Tue Jun 25, 2013 4:35 pm

@DaveWC - actually, you are likely incorrect on that one.

There is a range of key weighting that varies from manufacturer to manufacturer for e-pianos, and some people actually find some models (even some high-end digitals) too heavy for their taste.

You might be thinking of lower-end digital pianos or even semiweighted keyboard/synthesizers which do not have the true hammer action feel of a real piano. For the hammer-action real piano feel on a digital piano, it's typically $700+ for the lowest entry level model that does it acceptably. (Casio Privia and the Yamaha Clavinova are the two most popular in that price range.) Anything cheaper (unless bought used) will likely not have that true piano hammer-action feel, even if it claims to have 'weighted keys.'

The action on my Yamaha YDP-223 is excellent. I have no problems transitioning seamlessly to normal acoustic pianos.

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Re: Piano purchase

Post by JupiterJones » Tue Jun 25, 2013 5:04 pm

Dave76 wrote:But the keys are too light. They're not adequate for building finger strength.
No offense, really, but I'm beginning to suspect that you haven't played a digital piano on a par with the models being discussed here. The weight of the action is definitely equal to an acoustic piano.

I used to work as a full-time professional pianist and still occasionally take paid gigs on the side (did one just this past weekend, in fact). Theses days I use a Yamaha P-250 (which is the previous version of what they now sell as the CP-300). Everyone has their own preference when it comes to key weight, but IMHO the action is plenty heavy. Heavier than many acoustics I've played, actually.

In fact, it even has a "graded" action, where the keys are weighted slightly heavier on the lower notes than on the higher ones, just like a "real" piano would be.

And not only does it play back notes differently with lower key velocities (not merely lower in volume, but with a slightly different timbre too), it also models the sound of the damper felt resting back on the "strings" and the sound of string resonance (you can quietly press down keys in the middle of the keyboard, then sharply strike a note up top... the undampened notes will ring appropriately).

So I agree with the other posters that today's digital pianos have a lot to recommend them. The real thing is nice too, of course. But the hassles of tuning, limited portability, inability to practice quietly, etc., need to be considered. I would almost always recommend a digital piano to someone who is dipping their toe in the water.

Whichever way you go, I recommend checking out this site: http://www.pianobuyer.com/index.html



JJ
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Dave76
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by Dave76 » Tue Jun 25, 2013 5:38 pm

I'm standing firm on this. Digital pianos just don't have the aesthetic value of a traditional piano. And when it comes time to sell or trade up, you'll get a better return on your investment.

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Re: Piano purchase

Post by lethean46 » Tue Jun 25, 2013 6:25 pm

Dave76 wrote:I'm standing firm on this. Digital pianos just don't have the aesthetic value of a traditional piano. And when it comes time to sell or trade up, you'll get a better return on your investment.
I agree. One is trying to mimic the touch and sound of the other? Kind of says it all, to me.

Dave. Have you ever heard a player piano that plays "with expression?" An old neighbor had one and walking down the street you'd swear someone was playing beautiful piano. Turns out, the rolls that the neighbor had were Chopin himself playing Chopin. Etc. Etc. Awesome. His player piano was a baby grand. Don't know the manufacturer. And don't know the action as I never tried to play it. But he had 100s of rolls.
Last edited by lethean46 on Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.

lightheir
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by lightheir » Tue Jun 25, 2013 6:47 pm

Dave76 wrote:
kayman wrote:Professional pianist here. I'm going to second the advice on a digital keyboard.
But a digital electronic keyboard cannot match the sound and feel of the real thing. For instance, the sound volume on an electronic keyboard stays the same whether you press down hard on the keys or press down softly. I think his son would be better off experiencing the key dynamics of a real piano, especially in this beginner stage.
Honestly, this comment is so far from the reality of even an entry level digital piano, that I seriously doubt you've even spent any time with one. I don't know ANY digital piano that has no change in sound volume when you push harder or softly on it.

Have you ever actually played an digital piano (not a synthesizer)?

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Re: Piano purchase

Post by Dave76 » Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:47 pm

Alright. Forget it. I swear I can hear the difference, even on the internet. But I give in.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9pS5xzOWbwo

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matjen
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by matjen » Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:58 pm

Dave76 wrote:Alright. Forget it. I swear I can hear the difference, even on the internet. But I give in.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9pS5xzOWbwo
I can as well. Especially when the video is uploaded 6 years ago and who knows how old that "piano" she is playing is. Edit: Actually that appears to be an Electone Organ. This is is like comparing apples to oranges. http://asia.yamaha.com/en/products/musi ... /electone/

This technology has evolved it seems to me. How about trying this on for size. Some unknown in his living room.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qjleoIQqE_Q
A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone.

lightheir
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by lightheir » Tue Jun 25, 2013 10:35 pm

Dave76 wrote:Alright. Forget it. I swear I can hear the difference, even on the internet. But I give in.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9pS5xzOWbwo
Wow. I hope that was a tongue-in-cheek link. Otherwise, you've got a LOT to learn about digital pianos....

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indexfundfan
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by indexfundfan » Tue Jun 25, 2013 11:23 pm

Here's one recent digital piano, Kawi CE220, released last year. Available for less than $2k.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lqMkq7yEMvI
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jimmyq
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by jimmyq » Wed Jun 26, 2013 2:24 pm

I own both a digital keyboard (Kurzweil 88 key controller with weighted action), and a real piano (an old 1906 upright Steinway). The digital piano does have the advantages that you can use it with a pair of headphones and never needs tuning. From a pure cost standpoint, I'm sure it's the cheapest option in the long run.

However, I find that I never touch the digital keyboard anymore and always play on the real piano. Can't put my finger on it, but to me there's something special about using the real thing instead of a digital re-creation of a piano. The sound comes from a large soundboard instead of a pair of speakers, plus I know that every time I push down a key, there is a real hammer that is striking a real string. Yes I agree that some digital pianos sound better than cheap pianos. But I'd personally always play the real piano instead of a digital one if there were two sitting side-by-side.

If you decide to get a real piano, I'd recommend contacting a piano tuner/technician in your area. They often know of good quality used pianos that may be available in your area. Used Yamahas and Baldwins are usually good options for getting a good piano at a reasonable price, but I strongly recommend having a piano technician check out a used piano before purchasing. It's money well spent because they can make sure there aren't any major problems that will cost you a lot of money down the road.

lightheir
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Re: Piano purchase

Post by lightheir » Wed Jun 26, 2013 2:59 pm

jimmyq wrote:I own both a digital keyboard (Kurzweil 88 key controller with weighted action), and a real piano (an old 1906 upright Steinway). The digital piano does have the advantages that you can use it with a pair of headphones and never needs tuning. From a pure cost standpoint, I'm sure it's the cheapest option in the long run.

However, I find that I never touch the digital keyboard anymore and always play on the real piano. Can't put my finger on it, but to me there's something special about using the real thing instead of a digital re-creation of a piano. The sound comes from a large soundboard instead of a pair of speakers, plus I know that every time I push down a key, there is a real hammer that is striking a real string. Yes I agree that some digital pianos sound better than cheap pianos. But I'd personally always play the real piano instead of a digital one if there were two sitting side-by-side.

If you decide to get a real piano, I'd recommend contacting a piano tuner/technician in your area. They often know of good quality used pianos that may be available in your area. Used Yamahas and Baldwins are usually good options for getting a good piano at a reasonable price, but I strongly recommend having a piano technician check out a used piano before purchasing. It's money well spent because they can make sure there aren't any major problems that will cost you a lot of money down the road.
I'm actually sure I'd play the acoustic exclusively with a 1906 steinway in my house!

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