Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

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Browser
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Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by Browser » Thu Mar 21, 2013 9:08 pm

I'm away from my condo for 6 months and usually turn off the empty refrigerator. Someone mentioned that a fridge repairman said you should leave the fridge on at the lowest setting instead of turning it off. I'm assuming that this is supposed to keep the fridge in better mechanical condition than letting it sit dormant for months and then turning it on. Anyone know if this is correct advice?
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by sport » Thu Mar 21, 2013 9:52 pm

If you do turn it off, be sure to leave the door(s) ajar. Otherwise, mold may take over the unit.
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Recommendation from GE

Post by Sheepdog » Thu Mar 21, 2013 11:01 pm

If you are going to be away for more than one month, or are going to place the refrigerator in storage, GE recommends the following:
Remove food, turn off breaker (or fuse) or unplug from wall receptacle.
See your owner's manual for temperature control features for your model.
Turn the temperature control to Off.
Clean the interior with baking soda solution (1 tablespoon baking soda per 1 quart of water).
Wipe dry.
Place an open box of baking soda in the refrigerator or put 2 cups of dry (unused) coffee grounds in a small paper bag and place in the refrigerator.
Important: Leave the doors open.
These last 2 steps are to prevent the formation of food odors, mold and mildew.

If your refrigerator has an icemaker, turn the icemaker off and then turn off the water supply valve to the refrigerator.

Note: If you have a water dispenser model and are going to be away for an extended time, it would be best to drain the reservoir (located behind the meat and vegetable bins). If storing in an unheated space, draining the water tank is a must. If not drained, the water will freeze, causing the tank to rupture and leak when it warms up. The refrigerator's water valve may also need to be removed. If the temperature can reach below freezing, have a qualified servicer drain the water supply system. If you would like to schedule a service appointment, please contact GE Consumer Service or schedule a service appointment on-line
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by SimonJester » Fri Mar 22, 2013 1:48 pm

I made the mistake of cleaning out my FIL's firdge after he passed away (removing all food and cleaning it down), I then turn the unit off but left the doors closed. Luckily we caught it two days later and were able to use bleach to clean out the mold that had formed.

What ever you do if you turn off the unit you want to leave the doors open!
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by Toons » Fri Mar 22, 2013 1:51 pm

No doubt , Turn it off , leave the door open :happy
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by tyrion » Fri Mar 22, 2013 1:59 pm

For a family getaway cabin (used one or two weekends a month) -

Turn the frigde temp control all the way to off
Unscrew the lightbulb
Shove a towel in fridge and freezer doors to keep them propped open

So far, so good. The fridge looks about 20 years old.

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by obgraham » Fri Mar 22, 2013 3:10 pm

tyrion wrote:For a family getaway cabin .

Why not just pull the plug?

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by wesleymouch » Fri Mar 22, 2013 3:25 pm

Most newer frigs have an annual electricity cost of circa $55 dollars. Let it run

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tyrion
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by tyrion » Fri Mar 22, 2013 3:43 pm

obgraham wrote:
tyrion wrote:For a family getaway cabin .

Why not just pull the plug?


That would require pulling the fridge out to get to the plug. Not terribly difficult, but since the current system works well and there are different families going up it's easiest to stick with the current process.

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by Gill » Fri Mar 22, 2013 4:01 pm

wesleymouch wrote:Most newer frigs have an annual electricity cost of circa $55 dollars. Let it run

Less than $5 a month? I find that hard to believe. That would be about 38 kw. where I live.
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by Valuethinker » Fri Mar 22, 2013 4:14 pm

MBMiner wrote:
wesleymouch wrote:Most newer frigs have an annual electricity cost of circa $55 dollars. Let it run

Less than $5 a month? I find that hard to believe. That would be about 38 kw. where I live.
Bruce


Bruce

US average electricity price (retail) is 10.5 cents/ kwhr last I checked. In the southern states (not Texas!) it is lower.

A modern fridge, if not too many fancy features, not opened too often, burns arournd 550-700 kwhr pa. (a 1980 fridge around 2000 kwhr). If you are not opening it at all, then indeed you could be at 500 kwhr pa (depending on how hot the house gets, of course!).

Hence the figure of c. $55.

Conversely with 'tiered' rates (Interplanetjanet is your local expert) that they have in California I gather it is possible to pay over 30 cents/ kwhr. I believe Connecticut (and presumably New York City) 22 cents is possible.

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by Valuethinker » Fri Mar 22, 2013 4:17 pm

tyrion wrote:For a family getaway cabin (used one or two weekends a month) -

Turn the frigde temp control all the way to off
Unscrew the lightbulb
Shove a towel in fridge and freezer doors to keep them propped open

So far, so good. The fridge looks about 20 years old.


Ahhh.. if it is pre 1992 it is probably burning over 1000kwhr pa. 1200 kwhr pa quite possible.

http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fus ... gw_code=RF

calculator (excel spreadsheet on the right hand side of the page) will tell you just how much IF you have the model number.

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by Alex Frakt » Fri Mar 22, 2013 4:27 pm

tyrion wrote:For a family getaway cabin (used one or two weekends a month) -

Turn the frigde temp control all the way to off
Unscrew the lightbulb
Shove a towel in fridge and freezer doors to keep them propped open.

An empty live socket would bother me. A quick check doesn't turn up medium socket base safety caps, but for a couple of bucks you could get a socket to plug adapter and cap that.

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by tyrion » Fri Mar 22, 2013 4:38 pm

Alex Frakt wrote:
tyrion wrote:For a family getaway cabin (used one or two weekends a month) -

Turn the frigde temp control all the way to off
Unscrew the lightbulb
Shove a towel in fridge and freezer doors to keep them propped open.

An empty live socket would bother me. A quick check doesn't turn up medium socket base safety caps, but for a couple of bucks you could get a socket to plug adapter and cap that.


It's just a few turns until the light goes out. The socket itself isn't exposed.

There are a hundred things I would fix if I could (it's my wife's parents cabin), but the fridge is not high on the list. Uninsulated walls and floors - check. Unwrapped pipes that can (and do) freeze - check. Single pane windows - check. You get the idea.

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by BKennyB » Thu Oct 19, 2017 11:38 pm

As far as electrical cost of leaving refrigerator off or running for extended period of time: My friend & I each have condos in the same Florida community. When we weren't there for several months this summer, he left his refrigerator running and I turned mine off (after taking out the food and leaving the doors open). Both our air conditioners were set to humidistat 60 & temp 78 & both refrigerators were similar double door/bottom freezer type. Bottom line: his electric bill was just $7 per month more than mine (so $21 more). If you're only going to be away for a couple months, it might pay to leave the refrigerator on; for longer periods, you might want to turn it off or unplug it if you want to save some money.

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by lthenderson » Fri Oct 20, 2017 8:42 am

At our cabin that gets used for about 1 month a year, we turn the main breaker off and leave the door of the refrigerator open. We've been doing that way for 25 years without problems.

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by soupcxan » Fri Oct 20, 2017 9:21 am

Alex Frakt wrote:
Fri Mar 22, 2013 4:27 pm
tyrion wrote:For a family getaway cabin (used one or two weekends a month) -

Turn the frigde temp control all the way to off
Unscrew the lightbulb
Shove a towel in fridge and freezer doors to keep them propped open.
An empty live socket would bother me. A quick check doesn't turn up medium socket base safety caps, but for a couple of bucks you could get a socket to plug adapter and cap that.
What exactly is the risk of an empty socket? 120V is not going to arc across that and start a fire.

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by Pajamas » Fri Oct 20, 2017 9:27 am

wesleymouch wrote:
Fri Mar 22, 2013 3:25 pm
Most newer frigs have an annual electricity cost of circa $55 dollars. Let it run
Disadvantages: wastes money, wastes electricity, harms the environment, could cause a fire or other problem, shortens useful life of refrigerator

Advantages: easier than unplugging the refrigerator or flipping the circuit breaker

:oops:

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by unclescrooge » Fri Oct 20, 2017 9:35 am

tyrion wrote:
Fri Mar 22, 2013 1:59 pm
For a family getaway cabin (used one or two weekends a month) -

Turn the frigde temp control all the way to off
Unscrew the lightbulb
Shove a towel in fridge and freezer doors to keep them propped open

So far, so good. The fridge looks about 20 years old.
What does unscrewing the light bulb accomplish?

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by barnaclebob » Fri Oct 20, 2017 10:06 am

unclescrooge wrote:
Fri Oct 20, 2017 9:35 am
tyrion wrote:
Fri Mar 22, 2013 1:59 pm
For a family getaway cabin (used one or two weekends a month) -

Turn the frigde temp control all the way to off
Unscrew the lightbulb
Shove a towel in fridge and freezer doors to keep them propped open

So far, so good. The fridge looks about 20 years old.
What does unscrewing the light bulb accomplish?
They are leaving the fridge powered on but with the compressor set to off. The light would still come on if the door was open.

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by littlebird » Fri Oct 20, 2017 10:16 am

Alex Frakt wrote:
Fri Mar 22, 2013 4:27 pm
tyrion wrote:For a family getaway cabin (used one or two weekends a month) -

Turn the frigde temp control all the way to off
Unscrew the lightbulb
Shove a towel in fridge and freezer doors to keep them propped open.
An empty live socket would bother me. A quick check doesn't turn up medium socket base safety caps, but for a couple of bucks you could get a socket to plug adapter and cap that.
The bulb doesn't have to be completely removed; just unscrewed to the point where electrical contact is lost and the light goes out.

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by Sandtrap » Fri Oct 20, 2017 10:27 am

For vacant rental units I've done the following:

Turn frig off. Unplug it. Pull out drawers or shelf to keep the door open a few inches.

Make sure stove is turned off. Unplug it.

Turn off all circuit breakers that are not for lighting.

This was in areas where winter was not a concern.

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by Valuethinker » Sat Oct 21, 2017 10:24 am

BKennyB wrote:
Thu Oct 19, 2017 11:38 pm
As far as electrical cost of leaving refrigerator off or running for extended period of time: My friend & I each have condos in the same Florida community. When we weren't there for several months this summer, he left his refrigerator running and I turned mine off (after taking out the food and leaving the doors open). Both our air conditioners were set to humidistat 60 & temp 78 & both refrigerators were similar double door/bottom freezer type. Bottom line: his electric bill was just $7 per month more than mine (so $21 more). If you're only going to be away for a couple months, it might pay to leave the refrigerator on; for longer periods, you might want to turn it off or unplug it if you want to save some money.
Did you have any problems with mold?

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by btenny » Sat Oct 21, 2017 11:07 am

I have two homes. I go back and forth in the spring and fall. I leave both refrigerators running full time and full of stuff. I might not open them for 3-4 months at a time. I have never had a problem in 17 years. I keep lots of condiments and candles and some frozen stuff in it. Many of my neighbors also keep stuff in there refrigerators as well when they are gone all winter or summer.

The only issue any of us has is the ice maker feed line freezing. And that is easy to thaw out.

Good Luck.

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by Sandtrap » Sat Oct 21, 2017 11:12 am

The big issue with leaving it running is if the power goes off or the breaker trips. Then the door will be closed and if there is food in it, , , yuck. . . or even if empty, it may mold and stink because the door is closed, depends on climate. Couple of boxes of baking soda helps.

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by JBTX » Sat Oct 21, 2017 11:34 am

Gill wrote:
Fri Mar 22, 2013 4:01 pm
wesleymouch wrote:Most newer frigs have an annual electricity cost of circa $55 dollars. Let it run
Less than $5 a month? I find that hard to believe. That would be about 38 kw. where I live.
Bruce
We just got a new fridge. I was shocked at how low the rated energy consumption was. Of course i don’t know how accurate those ratings are.

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by Bill Bernstein » Sat Oct 21, 2017 11:58 am

Interesting thread. We're currently away from home, but our electrical utility has a daily usage feature, which shows that we're using about 2kWh per day. I'm guessing almost all of that is the fridge.

So, that's about $50-60 per year, which is not worth the trouble of emptying everything out and turning it off every time we leave.

Bill

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by nisiprius » Sat Oct 21, 2017 1:31 pm

Hah! Reminds me of the endless discussions about whether it is better to turn a computer off when not in use or leave it running. Many years ago I worked for two scientists, each of whom had a PDP-11, and one of them was insistent that it not be turned off, ever. Based on an assumption that turning it on put it under special stress. The other was equally insistent that it be turned off at night, based on the argument that all the time it was on, it was putting hours on the fans, the disk drive motors and bearings, and putting more dirt into the HEPA filters for the disk drives thus requiring more frequent replacement.

This topic always generates controversy because there is such an opportunity for superstitious behavior.

1) Even if the stress created by turning on power is small, if a device that is almost ready to fail is turned on, the power-on transient may be what puts it over the edge. The result is that powering it on "causes" it to fail, but if it had been left running it might not have lasted much longer anyway.

2) If a device fails, for any reason, while it is powered off, you will not know. The instant you will discover it is when you turn it on. This leads to the superstitious belief that turning it on caused the failure.

I figure: devices with power switches are engineered to be turned on and off, and unless the owner's manuals says something about it, it should be assumed that it's OK to turn them off when they are not going to be in use for a while.
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by dm200 » Sat Oct 21, 2017 1:57 pm

Hah! Reminds me of the endless discussions about whether it is better to turn a computer off when not in use or leave it running. Many years ago I worked for two scientists, each of whom had a PDP-11, and one of them was insistent that it not be turned off, ever. Based on an assumption that turning it on put it under special stress. The other was equally insistent that it be turned off at night, based on the argument that all the time it was on, it was putting hours on the fans, the disk drive motors and bearings, and putting more dirt into the HEPA filters for the disk drives thus requiring more frequent replacement.
These debates have been going on for many, many decades.

I vividly remember one such "incident" in July of 1967, fresh out of college and learning computer programming for my new job. Programs, then, were input on IBM punched cards done at a keypunch machine. As I finished my "deck", and got up from the keypunch, I turned off the keypunch machine. This other, a few years older, real jackass student/employee in the programming class, proceeded to yel at me and delivered the "sermon" about not powering off the machine. I have no idea whether he was right; the only thing I know is that he was a real jackass/jerk.

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by nisiprius » Sat Oct 21, 2017 2:29 pm

dm200 wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 1:57 pm
I vividly remember one such "incident" in July of 1967, fresh out of college and learning computer programming for my new job. Programs, then, were input on IBM punched cards done at a keypunch machine. As I finished my "deck", and got up from the keypunch, I turned off the keypunch machine. This other, a few years older, real jackass student/employee in the programming class, proceeded to yell at me and delivered the "sermon" about not powering off the machine. I have no idea whether he was right; the only thing I know is that he was a real jackass/jerk.
The rational basis goes back to the days of vacuum tubes. There were two issues. The first is that hot filaments, in incandescent light bulbs and vacuum tubes, have a resistance that varies a lot with temperature: low when cold, high when hot. (Indeed, Hewlett-Packard's very first product, an audio oscillator, used an incandescent bulb as a circuit element in a feedback loop to stabilize the oscillator's output level). So, when a light bulb or a tube is turned on, there is an initial inrush current that is very high. It would blow fuses if fuses weren't designed to have thermal inertia. In the case of a light bulb, if you can find a nice old-fashioned one with a clear bulb so you can see the filament, sometimes you can actually see the filament move due to the magnetic fields produced in the filament by the inrush current. So there really is thermal stress and mechanical stress on power-on.

Vacuum tubes not only have the "inrush current" problem, but also take many, many minutes to thermally stabilize. Real old-timers will remember waiting for a radio or TV to "warm up," and even after it seemed to warm up, it would tend to "drift" (not stay tuned to the same frequency) and need to be slightly retuned. In computers, vacuum tubes were babied because the machine might not run properly until it was fully warmed up, and because if there were a thousand tubes and each one of them had a life of a year, well... do the math.

A keypunch machine? I'll personally bet that he was wrong. A keypunch machine is highly electromechanical. I think it's a clear case of the other way around. If I recall correctly, as in an electric typewriter, there is a quiet hum of a motor that is running constantly... and probably needs a few drops of lubrication a few times a year...
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by JBTX » Sat Oct 21, 2017 3:02 pm

dm200 wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 1:57 pm
Hah! Reminds me of the endless discussions about whether it is better to turn a computer off when not in use or leave it running. Many years ago I worked for two scientists, each of whom had a PDP-11, and one of them was insistent that it not be turned off, ever. Based on an assumption that turning it on put it under special stress. The other was equally insistent that it be turned off at night, based on the argument that all the time it was on, it was putting hours on the fans, the disk drive motors and bearings, and putting more dirt into the HEPA filters for the disk drives thus requiring more frequent replacement.
These debates have been going on for many, many decades.

I vividly remember one such "incident" in July of 1967, fresh out of college and learning computer programming for my new job. Programs, then, were input on IBM punched cards done at a keypunch machine. As I finished my "deck", and got up from the keypunch, I turned off the keypunch machine. This other, a few years older, real jackass student/employee in the programming class, proceeded to yel at me and delivered the "sermon" about not powering off the machine. I have no idea whether he was right; the only thing I know is that he was a real jackass/jerk.
Punch cards! Arrrgh!! My first 2 programming classes in college, including COBOL, which took about 3 times the amount of code, were on punch cards. I would type up a 3-4 inch stack of punch cards, go feed them, then wait at the computer center for an output that told me how many errors I had made, and then re punch the error cards, etc, etc. This was early mid 80's, so PC's were out there, I guess the university just hadn't gotten to the point where it had enough or strong enough computers to have that stuff on PC's.

As to the fridge, if you turn if off and keep it closed it starts getting musty within days, even if dried out. I noticed that with the old fridge we put in the garage during remodel.

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by dm200 » Sat Oct 21, 2017 3:16 pm

A keypunch machine? I'll personally bet that he was wrong. A keypunch machine is highly electromechanical. I think it's a clear case of the other way around. If I recall correctly, as in an electric typewriter, there is a quiet hum of a motor that is running constantly... and probably needs a few drops of lubrication a few times a year...
Oh yes, I would be quite sure he was wrong. BUT - whether back 50 years ago or today, when you ar dealing with jackasses who like to show off and bully others around - logic and facts are, often, irrelevant.

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by Valuethinker » Sun Oct 22, 2017 9:20 am

Bill Bernstein wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 11:58 am
Interesting thread. We're currently away from home, but our electrical utility has a daily usage feature, which shows that we're using about 2kWh per day. I'm guessing almost all of that is the fridge.

So, that's about $50-60 per year, which is not worth the trouble of emptying everything out and turning it off every time we leave.

Bill
There are all sorts of "vampires" out there-- phone chargers, DSL modems and old cable set top boxes can have scary draws (I think the USA under President Bush was ahead of EU in putting in "1 watt" laws on such devices i.e. draw in wait state).

700 kwhr pa would not be a latest model US fridge but probably one made in the 21st century. The Energy Star numbers are unfortunately largely reliant about the makers themselves, so apparently not particularly accurate.

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by Valuethinker » Sun Oct 22, 2017 9:24 am

JBTX wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 11:34 am
Gill wrote:
Fri Mar 22, 2013 4:01 pm
wesleymouch wrote:Most newer frigs have an annual electricity cost of circa $55 dollars. Let it run
Less than $5 a month? I find that hard to believe. That would be about 38 kw. where I live.
Bruce
We just got a new fridge. I was shocked at how low the rated energy consumption was. Of course i don’t know how accurate those ratings are.
They are pretty accurate *but* are based on "ideal" usage and of course that never happens (it might be as low as 2 x 1 minute openings a day).

But if we think an early 80s model could do 2000 kwhr pa (about $220 at US average retail electricity prices) and one now can do 500 kwhr pa, then we see how much the technology has advanced. This is sometimes short-formed the "Art Rosenfeld effect" for the California Energy Commissioner (and physicist) who in the 1970s persuaded the then-Governor, a guy named Jerry Brown ( what ever happened to him? ;-)), to use energy conservation as a tool rather than approve a new nuclear power station.

Remembering that the 2017 fridge is 50% larger by volume (at least).

My fridge (Bosch) is rated at 300 kwhr pa but European fridges are much smaller ("American style fridge" is short form for double doors etc.).

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by Valuethinker » Sun Oct 22, 2017 9:25 am

unclescrooge wrote:
Fri Oct 20, 2017 9:35 am
tyrion wrote:
Fri Mar 22, 2013 1:59 pm
For a family getaway cabin (used one or two weekends a month) -

Turn the frigde temp control all the way to off
Unscrew the lightbulb
Shove a towel in fridge and freezer doors to keep them propped open

So far, so good. The fridge looks about 20 years old.
What does unscrewing the light bulb accomplish?
Would save a bit of juice (this assumes you don't also unplug the fridge).

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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by Valuethinker » Sun Oct 22, 2017 9:28 am

Pajamas wrote:
Fri Oct 20, 2017 9:27 am
wesleymouch wrote:
Fri Mar 22, 2013 3:25 pm
Most newer frigs have an annual electricity cost of circa $55 dollars. Let it run
Disadvantages: wastes money, wastes electricity, harms the environment, could cause a fire or other problem, shortens useful life of refrigerator

Advantages: easier than unplugging the refrigerator or flipping the circuit breaker

:oops:
Thermodynamics says that if you fill the freezer with ice and the fridge with bottled water, it will slightly worsen the performance.

But I believe I have seen that as a suggestion, and it may be something to do with making the compressor run less (in a strictly thermodynamic sense I don't think it can). That is, the compressor will have fewer, longer runs, and that is more efficient?

If the fridge is turned off, the door *has* to be propped open. Otherwise once the mold has grown, it's almost impossible to get rid of it fully.

Valuethinker
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by Valuethinker » Sun Oct 22, 2017 9:30 am

Gill wrote:
Fri Mar 22, 2013 4:01 pm
wesleymouch wrote:Most newer frigs have an annual electricity cost of circa $55 dollars. Let it run
Less than $5 a month? I find that hard to believe. That would be about 38 kw. where I live.
Bruce
This is a 2013 post (THREAD RESTARTED) so be wary of that.

But 50 kwhr pcm x 10.1 c/ kwhr is not a bad estimate of the usage of an American-style fridge sold in 2017. However it is quite dependent on how it's used (there is a standard for that measurement, and I don't remember how many times a day the door is opened, etc., external air temperature and so on).

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Pajamas
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by Pajamas » Sun Oct 22, 2017 3:26 pm

Also wanted to add that if you have ever opened a refrigerator or freezer that had food in it after it stopped working for any reason, including a power outage, you won't want to leave one running with food in it when you are away for long periods of time. Basically, you would have to buy a new refrigerator because there is no way to get that stench out of the plastic even if you could get stains off, if any.

TravelGeek
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by TravelGeek » Sun Oct 22, 2017 5:27 pm

Pajamas wrote:
Sun Oct 22, 2017 3:26 pm
Also wanted to add that if you have ever opened a refrigerator or freezer that had food in it after it stopped working for any reason, including a power outage, you won't want to leave one running with food in it when you are away for long periods of time. Basically, you would have to buy a new refrigerator because there is no way to get that stench out of the plastic even if you could get stains off, if any.
So I am away from home for a week or two about five or six times a year. I agree with your concern, but emptying out the fridge and freezer five or six times a year seems impractical and over time potentially more expensive (throw away lots of perfectly good food items?) than taking the risk of buying a new fridge if it does happen.

(our fridge is a 2014 model, so I am assessing the risk as relatively small for the time being).

JBTX
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by JBTX » Sun Oct 22, 2017 6:28 pm

TravelGeek wrote:
Sun Oct 22, 2017 5:27 pm
Pajamas wrote:
Sun Oct 22, 2017 3:26 pm
Also wanted to add that if you have ever opened a refrigerator or freezer that had food in it after it stopped working for any reason, including a power outage, you won't want to leave one running with food in it when you are away for long periods of time. Basically, you would have to buy a new refrigerator because there is no way to get that stench out of the plastic even if you could get stains off, if any.
So I am away from home for a week or two about five or six times a year. I agree with your concern, but emptying out the fridge and freezer five or six times a year seems impractical and over time potentially more expensive (throw away lots of perfectly good food items?) than taking the risk of buying a new fridge if it does happen.

(our fridge is a 2014 model, so I am assessing the risk as relatively small for the time being).
Agree. We are on vacation at least one or two weeks a year for almost 2 decades and there has never been anything that has caused either fridge or freezer to permanently stink. Worst case I can ever recall our power being out is a few hours and that is very rare.

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Pajamas
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Post by Pajamas » Sun Oct 22, 2017 7:43 pm

One or two weeks may be worth the risk, but six months as stated in the original post in this thread is certainly not worth the risk to me. It may be to others who have not had to deal with a freezer that had food in it when the electricity was cut off for a few weeks.

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