Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

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interplanetjanet
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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by interplanetjanet » Tue Jan 22, 2013 9:25 pm

I went all-Unix for personal computing in the very early '90s. This was before Linux, when the state of WYSIWYG word processing (for example) on Unix was really dismal. I didn't own a PC until fairly recently, so I'd say that yes, going all Unix is certainly possible. You may or may not get the user experience you are after, though. Some things are much better than they used to be. Others, not so much.

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by 3CT_Paddler » Tue Jan 22, 2013 9:34 pm

lindisfarne wrote: Any opinions?
I am not a Linux expert by any means, but this worked well for me... http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/ ... -installer

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by LadyGeek » Tue Jan 22, 2013 9:43 pm

Actually, that's just about the easiest way to "try" Linux. In human readable form: Download the Windows installer for Ubuntu Desktop

Linux is installed as one large file inside Windows, so you don't have to worry about formatting your disk. I was an Ubuntu fan until they introduced the "unity" desktop. Then, I hopped over to Fedora (just updated to Fedora 18) with the XFCE desktop and have been with it ever since.

Fedora is the freeware version of Red Hat, which is a major distro and has been around for quite some time. We have it in work, so it's worthwhile to learn.

I'm dual-booting, as I need MS Windows for a few programs (like Quicken). If I need a license, I might as well use the real thing rather than run inside an emulator.
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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by tc101 » Tue Jan 22, 2013 9:53 pm

I am linux 99% of the time. I do have a windows computer that I use for iTunes and Turbo Tax. You can get these to run on Linux, but I could not get them to work quickly and easily so it was easier to run them on an old windows machine. I am running Ubuntu 12.04. I am very happy with it.
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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by tc101 » Tue Jan 22, 2013 9:55 pm

I was an Ubuntu fan until they introduced the "unity" desktop.
I felt that way at first, but now I have made the switch to Unity and I actually prefer it.
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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by investor1 » Tue Jan 22, 2013 10:23 pm

I have noticed some PDFs are not viewable using the latest version of whatever PDF viewer comes with Ubuntu. That's annoying when those PDFs are utility bills or finanical documents, etc. I tend to combat it by downloading the file on Windows and using PDFCreator to re-generate the file. Afterwards, it is viewable in Ubuntu.

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by lindisfarne » Tue Jan 22, 2013 10:41 pm

LadyGeek wrote:Actually, that's just about the easiest way to "try" Linux. In human readable form: Download the Windows installer for Ubuntu Desktop

Linux is installed as one large file inside Windows, so you don't have to worry about formatting your disk. I was an Ubuntu fan until they introduced the "unity" desktop. Then, I hopped over to Fedora (just updated to Fedora 18) with the XFCE desktop and have been with it ever since.

Fedora is the freeware version of Red Hat, which is a major distro and has been around for quite some time. We have it in work, so it's worthwhile to learn.

I'm dual-booting, as I need MS Windows for a few programs (like Quicken). If I need a license, I might as well use the real thing rather than run inside an emulator.
Thanks for the information. Why is there a freeware version of Red Hat? What does Red Hat add that inspires people to pay money for it? (This is a real question - perhaps there is good reason to pay for Red Hat?)

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by lightheir » Tue Jan 22, 2013 11:03 pm

lindisfarne wrote:
LadyGeek wrote:Actually, that's just about the easiest way to "try" Linux. In human readable form: Download the Windows installer for Ubuntu Desktop

Linux is installed as one large file inside Windows, so you don't have to worry about formatting your disk. I was an Ubuntu fan until they introduced the "unity" desktop. Then, I hopped over to Fedora (just updated to Fedora 18) with the XFCE desktop and have been with it ever since.

Fedora is the freeware version of Red Hat, which is a major distro and has been around for quite some time. We have it in work, so it's worthwhile to learn.

I'm dual-booting, as I need MS Windows for a few programs (like Quicken). If I need a license, I might as well use the real thing rather than run inside an emulator.
Thanks for the information. Why is there a freeware version of Red Hat? What does Red Hat add that inspires people to pay money for it? (This is a real question - perhaps there is good reason to pay for Red Hat?)
I'm not a CPU expert, but have been around long enough to know that Red Hat made a lot of money off commercial software support for big enterprise, which always needs some sort of customer support. It's not a big deal for consumers who can individually take whatever time is needed to look up how to solve their own problems at their own pace, but for mission-critical large scale software deployments, Red Hat had a ton of corporate customers for their customer support - they were one of the first to successfully do the model of open source free software + paid support on large scale, and it worked very well for them.

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by jpsfranks » Tue Jan 22, 2013 11:04 pm

For those unhappy with Unity (I don't much care for it myself), you can simply install the package of another desktop environment from the repositories (Xfce for example) and then choose the alternate environment by clicking the Ubuntu logo in the login box from the login screen. Takes about 10 seconds to switch.

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by LiamLC » Tue Jan 22, 2013 11:45 pm

I mostly use Linux because you can do anything on it with Wine and virtualization software. Once you get past the learning curve it's great!

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by rayout » Wed Jan 23, 2013 12:08 am

It's going to be hard to resist getting into Linux when I can build my next computer (a media PC) for around $100

System on a chip will run around $60 for shipping plus an enclosure: http://www.raspberrypi.org/faqs

After accounting for the other supplies (SD Card, wifi adapter, blue tooth adapter for remote, spare USB cables) I'll be ready to go. Might save $7 or so for the enclosure by modifying and altoids tin or something :P

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by ejvyas » Wed Jan 23, 2013 12:21 am

Ubuntu since last 3-4 yrs on personal computer. No issues. Except for some company VPN software (eg. Cisco) does not have compatible Linux version & no netflix. My work laptop needs Windows

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by interplanetjanet » Wed Jan 23, 2013 5:30 am

ejvyas wrote:Ubuntu since last 3-4 yrs on personal computer. No issues. Except for some company VPN software (eg. Cisco) does not have compatible Linux version & no netflix. My work laptop needs Windows
You may want to check out vpnc for Cisco VPN connectivity. It doesn't support every possible configuration that a Cisco VPN endpoint can be set up to demand, but it does a good job and is quite solid; it also allows you to do things such as split routing and supports more exotic network configurations than the Cisco client.

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by THY4373 » Wed Jan 23, 2013 8:30 am

lightheir wrote:
I'm not a CPU expert, but have been around long enough to know that Red Hat made a lot of money off commercial software support for big enterprise, which always needs some sort of customer support. It's not a big deal for consumers who can individually take whatever time is needed to look up how to solve their own problems at their own pace, but for mission-critical large scale software deployments, Red Hat had a ton of corporate customers for their customer support - they were one of the first to successfully do the model of open source free software + paid support on large scale, and it worked very well for them.
The paid for version of Red Hat is Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and it is quite different than Fedora Core (FC) which is what is freely available from Red Hat. FC is much more bleeding edge and is essentially a test bed for stuff that will/may be incorporated into RHEL in the future. Also FC is only supported with patches and updates (at least last I looked) for 18 months. While RHEL is supported for 10 years. RHEL is one of the most rock solid distros out there but the software tends to be older (more tested). If you want RHEL you can get free "de-branded" versions such a CentOS, Scientific Linux (version I use) and Oracle Linux (please don't). For my home server I run Scientific Linux and it is much more solid than Ubuntu or Mint were for me. I still use Mint as my desktop OS though because the software is more current. But for server use I'll use one of the free RHEL derivatives.

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by linuxuser » Wed Jan 23, 2013 8:39 am

lightheir wrote:
telemark wrote:As of a few months ago, there's an easy way to run Netflix on Linux.

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:ehoover/compholio
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install netflix-desktop

Then run the newly installed Netflix Desktop and enter your email address and password. It runs Microsoft Silverlight under WINE with a patched copy of Firefox, although you don't need to know that to use it.
Man, I love the idea of using Linux and all, but there is NOTHING user-friendly about the first line of that command chain. Makes me remember why GUIs are so much better for me (and I took the time to learn UNIX at one point.)
It isn't hard to copy and paste or just type the command line(s) in a Terminal window.
That first line is to add another place where Ubuntu would look for software. Maybe that is what you are wondering.

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by linuxuser » Wed Jan 23, 2013 8:46 am

jpsfranks wrote:For those unhappy with Unity (I don't much care for it myself), you can simply install the package of another desktop environment from the repositories (Xfce for example) and then choose the alternate environment by clicking the Ubuntu logo in the login box from the login screen. Takes about 10 seconds to switch.
I installed Gnome Tweak Tool and log into Gnome Classic.

Instructions for those interested. http://rbgeek.wordpress.com/2012/05/16/ ... %E2%80%8F/

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by dratkinson » Wed Jan 23, 2013 2:25 pm

It's time for me to do something about my old PC as TaxACT online no longer supports its browser (FireFox v2).

All I use this PC for is my Gmail account, reading this forum, information searches, tracking my investments (Excel97), taxes (online for the past few years), and access to my old Office97 records (documents, spreadsheets) and I must not lose them. I foresee no need for streaming data and my dialup connection is slow/cheap/fine with me.

My old PC is a '90s-vintage Dell P2, 64MB ram, 20/10GB partitioned IDE HDs (primary/data backup), Win98SE, dialup connection, DVD burner. It does not support USB stick memories. It has been rock-solid since new and SpinRite keeps the 15+ yo HDs in good condition.

I looked at LadyGeek's Ubuntu download and at ~4GB is un-doable for me.

Is it possible for me to buy/boot from a Linux CD, establish a dialup connection to TaxACT and do my taxes online? (The required browsers are Internet Explorer 6.0+, Firefox 3.6+, Google Chrome 17+, Safari 5+, AOL 9.0+.) Then reboot/revert to Win98 for everything else?

Or is it time to buy a cheap used Win7 machine with the current MS Office software? (I'm following the logic that Win7 was good, so Win8 will be bad.)

If I can convert my PC to Linux, how hard is it to convert my Excel files/macros/functions to OpenOffice/LibreOffice format? (I have not kept current with the Star/Open/Libre Office naming conventions. Is LibreOffice the most current? Or is it the Linux variant?)



If I do nothing, my current plan is to use my neighbors' Win7 PC to do my taxes online... and kick this can down the road for one more year. But I really hate being at MS's mercy when it comes to its orphaned OSs/customers and would like to escape permanently. Don't really want to spend another $1K+ just to continue renting access to my records via MS's latest OS/Office.

Suggestions for the least cost way to escape with my records/files intact greatly appreciated.
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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by lindisfarne » Wed Jan 23, 2013 2:43 pm

All I use this PC for is my Gmail account, reading this forum, tracking my investments (Excel97), and access to my old Office97 records (documents, spreadsheets) and I must not lose them. I foresee no need for streaming data and my dialup connection is slow/cheap/fine with me.
Why not burn those documents to a few DVDs? My Office 2007 is compatible with Office 97 - if you're worried about compatibility disappearing at some point, why not use someone's newer computer to simply "save as" those documents in a newer format (you could do this to a flash drive & then when all are converted, save to a several DVDs so you have backup copies).

If you're worried about something being lost in the conversion (there's no problem with relatively simple spreadsheets back to office 2000), is it possible to print the files, so you have a hard copy you can check? Depending on how big your spreadsheets are, you could use Adobe/CutePDF (free) to print to a PDF, but you'd have to do that on a newer computer, I'll bet.

Or did I not understand your question?

There are flash drives with encryption options & there probably is a way to burn a dvd that way, but I don't need that.

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by MathWizard » Wed Jan 23, 2013 2:50 pm

lightheir wrote:
telemark wrote:As of a few months ago, there's an easy way to run Netflix on Linux.

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:ehoover/compholio
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install netflix-desktop

Then run the newly installed Netflix Desktop and enter your email address and password. It runs Microsoft Silverlight under WINE with a patched copy of Firefox, although you don't need to know that to use it.
Man, I love the idea of using Linux and all, but there is NOTHING user-friendly about the first line of that command chain. Makes me remember why GUIs are so much better for me (and I took the time to learn UNIX at one point.)
And yet:

http://www.bogleheads.org/forum/viewtop ... st=1592391

is user-friendly?


ppa:ehoover/compholio is basically a web address, just not http, it is a personal package archive for

Eric Hoover.

Putiing this into google gets you that quite quickly.

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telemark
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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by telemark » Wed Jan 23, 2013 3:18 pm

dratkinson wrote: My old PC is a '90s-vintage Dell P2, 64MB ram, 20/10GB partitioned IDE HDs (primary/data backup), Win98SE, dialup connection, DVD burner. It does not support USB stick memories. It has been rock-solid since new and SpinRite keeps the 15+ yo HDs in good condition.
You can order Linux install DVDs, but the 64MB ram may be the biggest problem. Even the Raspberry Pi is shipping with four times that much. There's a browser named Opera that should work with Taxact, but I can't find any place on their web site that says if it will run on Windows 98. That's an old machine you've got there.

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by linuxuser » Wed Jan 23, 2013 3:47 pm

telemark wrote:
dratkinson wrote: My old PC is a '90s-vintage Dell P2, 64MB ram, 20/10GB partitioned IDE HDs (primary/data backup), Win98SE, dialup connection, DVD burner. It does not support USB stick memories. It has been rock-solid since new and SpinRite keeps the 15+ yo HDs in good condition.
You can order Linux install DVDs, but the 64MB ram may be the biggest problem. Even the Raspberry Pi is shipping with four times that much. There's a browser named Opera that should work with Taxact, but I can't find any place on their web site that says if it will run on Windows 98. That's an old machine you've got there.
64MB is the problem.

For that vintage PC, look at Puppy Linux. I have it running on a Thinkpad 600E laptop (288MB RAM = 256MB + 32MB)which I haven't used in a year.

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by Meta4 » Wed Jan 23, 2013 5:16 pm

dratkinson wrote: My old PC is a '90s-vintage Dell P2, 64MB ram, 20/10GB partitioned IDE HDs (primary/data backup), Win98SE, dialup connection, DVD burner. It does not support USB stick memories. It has been rock-solid since new and SpinRite keeps the 15+ yo HDs in good condition.
Like others have implied, it's probably time to get a newer computer. While your current system will likely accept more RAM , that's money better spent on a newer system. If you're in an urban area I'd check craigslist.org; I've seen newer systems than yours being given away for free! Certainly you'll find more than adequate desktop systems for under $100 listed, many that come complete with an LCD display, keyboard and mouse. If you want to stick with Windows I'd restrict my searches to systems that have Windows 7 installed as XP will see it's support dropped in the very near future and Vista is, well, Vista. As tablets & ultrabooks are all the rage these days, you can actually pick up a decent desktop new for under $300, or even a basic laptop of around $400.

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by cb474 » Wed Jan 23, 2013 10:01 pm

I've been exclusively using Linux for about eight or nine years. At first I dual booted Windows, in case I needed it for something, but it's been years since I haven't had any version of Windows on my machine. I've never run into any problems, for personal use. I started out with Ubuntu, then went to Debian, then Arch Linux, now I'm using Llinux Mint Debian Edition, but am thinking of trying out the new easier to install Arch based distro called Manjaro.

For those who don't like Unity in Ubuntu, or the way that Gnome has changed with Gnome 3, there is a fork of the old Gnome 2 desktop that was used in Ubuntu, called Mate. A lot of distros offer a version with Mate now. Linux Mint has both an Ubuntu based and Debian based version with Mate. You can install Mate in Arch. Fedora has Mate now. I think probably all the major distros offer a Mate version (or way to install it). Also Fuduntu, which was originally forked from Fedora, is still maintaining Gnome 2. Fuduntu has probalby the best out of the box Gnome 2 set up, but its package repositories can be a bit limited.

Anyway, I think Linux is on a par with, if not better than, Windows and OS X for several years now, unless there's some very specific professional piece of software you need. But for personal use the software is a good as anywhere (for email, web browing, office software, music and video, etc.). And of course, Linux is a lot more secure than Windows (and OS X is starting to become a target for trojans/viruses).

And one of the biggest advantages of Linux (which is why I originally switched to it) is that you have a lot more choices of desktop environments (Gnome, KDE, XFCE, Mate, Cinnamon, LXDE, Openbox/Fluxbox types of setups, and more).

It's also super easy now to try out different Linux distros by just installing them to a USB stick (you don't have to waste a CD). So anybody thinking about it can see how Linux would look on their computer without having to install it at all.

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by telemark » Wed Jan 23, 2013 11:11 pm

telemark wrote: There's a browser named Opera that should work with TaxACT, but I can't find any place on their web site that says if it will run on Windows 98.
Found a thread here that indicates that it can be made to work. I would try that first: Opera is supposed to work well with slow connections, so that would be a bonus. Their web site is http://www.opera.com/

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by ejvyas » Thu Jan 24, 2013 12:26 am

linuxuser wrote:
telemark wrote:
dratkinson wrote: My old PC is a '90s-vintage Dell P2, 64MB ram, 20/10GB partitioned IDE HDs (primary/data backup), Win98SE, dialup connection, DVD burner. It does not support USB stick memories. It has been rock-solid since new and SpinRite keeps the 15+ yo HDs in good condition.
You can order Linux install DVDs, but the 64MB ram may be the biggest problem. Even the Raspberry Pi is shipping with four times that much. There's a browser named Opera that should work with Taxact, but I can't find any place on their web site that says if it will run on Windows 98. That's an old machine you've got there.
64MB is the problem.

For that vintage PC, look at Puppy Linux. I have it running on a Thinkpad 600E laptop (288MB RAM = 256MB + 32MB)which I haven't used in a year.
Love Puppy Linux. I am using it on a first gen laptop without issues. Those dell laptops wont even run Chrome OS (may be it is not detecting some hardware)

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by dratkinson » Thu Jan 24, 2013 2:23 pm

Thanks, all. I'll play with Opera and Puppy Linux and see what I can do.

Agree this machine has got to be replaced at some point. Following your suggestion I checked and CL seems to be full of candidate machines. I just need to learn to decipher the new buzz words to understand installed components.


ejvyas wrote:... Love Puppy Linux. I am using it on a first gen laptop without issues. Those dell laptops wont even run Chrome OS (may be it is not detecting some hardware)
First gen laptop? Would that be Toshiba T1000 first gen old? (I've got one of those around here somewhere. It ran WordPerfect v5 (DOS) when I did my thesis. Still worked the last time I dusted it off and tried it a few years back.)
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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by linuxuser » Thu Jan 24, 2013 3:07 pm

dratkinson wrote:Thanks, all. I'll play with Opera and Puppy Linux and see what I can do.

Agree this machine has got to be replaced at some point. Following your suggestion I checked and CL seems to be full of candidate machines. I just need to learn to decipher the new buzz words to understand installed components.
What is the model of your Dell PC? My first Dell was a XPS P90, a 90MHz Pentium 1. I still have two sticks of 4MB RAM for it.


As for Craigslist for PCs, I would compare to prices on eBay and factor in the shipping cost difference and use that price to negotiate the Craigslist price.

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by dratkinson » Thu Jan 24, 2013 3:57 pm

linuxuser wrote:
dratkinson wrote:Thanks, all. I'll play with Opera and Puppy Linux and see what I can do.

Agree this machine has got to be replaced at some point. Following your suggestion I checked and CL seems to be full of candidate machines. I just need to learn to decipher the new buzz words to understand installed components.
What is the model of your Dell PC? My first Dell was a XPS P90, a 90MHz Pentium 1. I still have two sticks of 4MB RAM for it.


As for Craigslist for PCs, I would compare to prices on eBay and factor in the shipping cost difference and use that price to negotiate the Craigslist price.
My old Dell is an OptiPlex GXa, desktop. It's probably not worth any upgrading attempts.

In the late '80s, I remember *upgrading my 5" floppy-disk-based Radio Shack T-1000 (desktop) from its original 8088 processor to an NEC V20 processor (~$20), and adding a MiniScribe 20MB hard-card (hard drive mounted to proprietary interface card, ~$600). At the time I appreciated the increased speed. But now I understand it was a waste of money. That money would have been better spent toward a newer machine/technology. Such is hindsight. :)
  • *From this experience I came to believe, "Radio Shack, you may find higher quality elsewhere, but you'll never spend more."
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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by linuxuser » Thu Jan 24, 2013 5:45 pm

Your Dell Optiplex GXa which has maximum RAM of 384MB is the same generation as my IBM Thinkpad 600E, so yeah, unless you can find some old PC66 RAM lying around, it isn't worth it to upgrade. If you had maxed out the RAM originally, you would still be able to run Puppy Linux.

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by bawr » Thu Jan 24, 2013 6:15 pm

interplanetjanet wrote:I went all-Unix for personal computing in the very early '90s. This was before Linux, when the state of WYSIWYG word processing (for example) on Unix was really dismal.
There were some very nice WYSIWYG word processors for NEXTSTEP (the precursor to Mac OS X) in those days, which were arguably superior to offerings on any other platform. There was also FrameMaker for SunOS, and other UNIX platforms. Anyway, who needs WYSIWYG when there is TeX?

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by GammaPoint » Thu Jan 24, 2013 6:18 pm

All my computers (both work and personal) run Xubuntu. I boot into Windows using VirtualBox because I need to run iTunes to put music on my Touch, but that's all I use it for. If I didn't have to use iTunes I would never log onto anything but linux.

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by bawr » Thu Jan 24, 2013 6:20 pm

ejvyas wrote:Ubuntu since last 3-4 yrs on personal computer. No issues. Except for some company VPN software (eg. Cisco) does not have compatible Linux version & no netflix. My work laptop needs Windows
The old IPSec-only Cisco VPN Client, which has now been discontinued for all platforms, is still available for download for Linux.

The Cisco AnyConnect client, which is actively developed, is most certainly available for Linux.

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Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by interplanetjanet » Thu Jan 24, 2013 7:08 pm

bawr wrote:
interplanetjanet wrote:I went all-Unix for personal computing in the very early '90s. This was before Linux, when the state of WYSIWYG word processing (for example) on Unix was really dismal.
There were some very nice WYSIWYG word processors for NEXTSTEP (the precursor to Mac OS X) in those days, which were arguably superior to offerings on any other platform. There was also FrameMaker for SunOS, and other UNIX platforms. Anyway, who needs WYSIWYG when there is TeX?
Frame was certainly out there. It was also (digging in my memory here) more than $4k per seat, even with discounts. Applixware wasn't around yet and once it was, it was quite expensive until the mid '90s. StarOffice was obtainable in the mid '90s but only in German localizations and only through weird channels (at least here in the USA). EZ (Andrew/CMU) was probably the best early "open source" effort, but was still in early development and was much more "What You See Is What You Might Get". Dismal.

I make no value judgements about WYSIWYG, but it is what microcomputer users at the time were starting to expect as a baseline for productivity work.

NeXTSTEP was niche. Neat, but one of the more sticky-out branches on the Unix tree.

Edit: I forgot about Interleaf. My brain must be getting old.

Cash
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Joined: Wed Mar 10, 2010 10:52 am

Re: Anybody here go all-Linux for personal computing?

Post by Cash » Fri Jan 25, 2013 7:16 am

interplanetjanet wrote:
ejvyas wrote:Ubuntu since last 3-4 yrs on personal computer. No issues. Except for some company VPN software (eg. Cisco) does not have compatible Linux version & no netflix. My work laptop needs Windows
You may want to check out vpnc for Cisco VPN connectivity. It doesn't support every possible configuration that a Cisco VPN endpoint can be set up to demand, but it does a good job and is quite solid; it also allows you to do things such as split routing and supports more exotic network configurations than the Cisco client.
I recently formatted an old laptop that had become bloated and slow, and rather than reinstall Windows XP, I installed lubuntu onto it. Love it, and it works great as a netbook (I have another laptop with Windows 7). Only problem is I need to use a VPN for work and can't for the life of me figure out how to get Citrix to work. Perhaps I will try this.

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