Sources to learning the basics of investing?

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lhwerdyt*1791c
Posts: 299
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 12:04 am

Sources to learning the basics of investing?

Post by lhwerdyt*1791c »

Hi,

In retirement.

I understand the Bogle and related method of investing (Asset Allocation, Low Cost Index Funds, Rebalancing) and have enlightened several people about it since literally buying into it not too long ago, myself. I'm not looking to veer from it but need additional self-education on broader investing basics, such as terminology, types of funds, taxation on funds; fund performance measures; fund fact sheets, etc., without going too deep as I have limited personal time due to responsibilities.

Other than this helpful forum, including its Wiki pages, any recommendations?

What do you think of Investopedia, for example?

Many thanks,
W
ScubaHogg
Posts: 1548
Joined: Sun Nov 06, 2011 3:02 pm

Re: Sources to learning the basics of investing?

Post by ScubaHogg »

Bump. I’m sure someone has a pre made list, I’ll let them post

Edit to add:

The wiki has a comprehensive reading list that should take you pretty far

https://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Book_re ... nd_reviews
Pierre-Simon Laplace’s original phrase for expected value was “mathematical hope.”
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retiredjg
Posts: 49270
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2008 12:56 pm

Re: Sources to learning the basics of investing?

Post by retiredjg »

lhwerdyt*1791c wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 1:21 am What do you think of Investopedia, for example?
A mixed bag I'm afraid. I have not found Investopedia to be a reliable resource.
Nowizard
Posts: 4190
Joined: Tue Oct 23, 2007 5:33 pm

Re: Sources to learning the basics of investing?

Post by Nowizard »

The Wiki here will cover it very well.

Tim
MattB
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Joined: Fri May 28, 2021 12:27 am

Re: Sources to learning the basics of investing?

Post by MattB »

lhwerdyt*1791c wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 1:21 am Hi,

In retirement.

I understand the Bogle and related method of investing (Asset Allocation, Low Cost Index Funds, Rebalancing) and have enlightened several people about it since literally buying into it not too long ago, myself. I'm not looking to veer from it but need additional self-education on broader investing basics, such as terminology, types of funds, taxation on funds; fund performance measures; fund fact sheets, etc., without going too deep as I have limited personal time due to responsibilities.

Other than this helpful forum, including its Wiki pages, any recommendations?

What do you think of Investopedia, for example?

Many thanks,
W
I have learned a lot from reading this forum, and from posting and soliciting criticism and feedback on our own portfolio. "The basics" are sufficient for 99% of people to do well, and arguably a significant fraction of people would be better investors if they felt they knew less.

That said, you might read The Simple Path to Wealth by J.L. Collins, or similar books until you are comfortable with the vocabulary and can think critically about the suggestions they provide. Social Security Made Simple, by Mike Piper, is also a short and worthwhile read to begin familiarizing you yourself with the Social Security vocabulary.

That said, I'll emphasize my first point. You can be a very successful investor by following a list of rules that fit on an index card—
  • Live below your means.
  • Invest early, often, and consistently.
  • Invest in low-cost, broadly diversified index funds.
  • Work to increase your income over time.
  • Enjoy life.
It needn't be more complex than that.
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Sandtrap
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Location: Hawaii No Ka Oi , N. Arizona

Re: Sources to learning the basics of investing?

Post by Sandtrap »

lhwerdyt*1791c wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 1:21 am Hi,

In retirement.

I understand the Bogle and related method of investing (Asset Allocation, Low Cost Index Funds, Rebalancing) and have enlightened several people about it since literally buying into it not too long ago, myself. I'm not looking to veer from it but need additional self-education on broader investing basics, such as terminology, types of funds, taxation on funds; fund performance measures; fund fact sheets, etc., without going too deep as I have limited personal time due to responsibilities.

Other than this helpful forum, including its Wiki pages, any recommendations?

What do you think of Investopedia, for example?

Many thanks,
W
to OP: (original poster, you)
Aloha, welcome to "thee forum".

As others have suggested, you can go a long way by going through the "entire forum wiki" from the start, and even end up knowing and understanding as much as or more than many Financial Advisors with certificates.
For example:
A Start:
Here are links to the wiki's "Getting Started" and "Investing Startup Kit" pages:
https://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Getting_started
https://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Bogleh ... rt-up_kit
Define General Investment Goals and Objectives (what is your plan?)
https://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Invest ... statement
And so forth:......

That said, you are only going to get so much as you have and are willing to put the time into the reading, the absorbing, the understanding, etc.

Note: Financial knowledge and internalized understanding (important) is much like the concept of learning about law enough to know what questions to ask and where to find "law" where and when you need it. See?

to OP:
That said: question"
1
In what areas of personal investment finance, or business finance, or "what" finance, do you "need to apply to you personally and to optimize a personal long term financial strategy (life).?
2
Or, do you wish to improve an overall personal financial investment strategy, etc, education, and familiarity, to be able to discuss such matters with others?
3
Etc?

As to your "investopedia question", imho the forum wiki is highly condensed and efficient vs "investopedia" and many online similars can end up in "rabbit holes" with poor focus and direction. . and also may have bias and "sales agendas, etc, as well as media spin". *(what thee forum calls "noise")
j :D
Wiki Bogleheads Wiki: Everything You Need to Know
strummer6969
Posts: 450
Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2020 11:59 am

Re: Sources to learning the basics of investing?

Post by strummer6969 »

MattB wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 8:35 am
lhwerdyt*1791c wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 1:21 am Hi,

In retirement.

I understand the Bogle and related method of investing (Asset Allocation, Low Cost Index Funds, Rebalancing) and have enlightened several people about it since literally buying into it not too long ago, myself. I'm not looking to veer from it but need additional self-education on broader investing basics, such as terminology, types of funds, taxation on funds; fund performance measures; fund fact sheets, etc., without going too deep as I have limited personal time due to responsibilities.

Other than this helpful forum, including its Wiki pages, any recommendations?

What do you think of Investopedia, for example?

Many thanks,
W
I have learned a lot from reading this forum, and from posting and soliciting criticism and feedback on our own portfolio. "The basics" are sufficient for 99% of people to do well, and arguably a significant fraction of people would be better investors if they felt they knew less.

That said, you might read The Simple Path to Wealth by J.L. Collins, or similar books until you are comfortable with the vocabulary and can think critically about the suggestions they provide. Social Security Made Simple, by Mike Piper, is also a short and worthwhile read to begin familiarizing you yourself with the Social Security vocabulary.

That said, I'll emphasize my first point. You can be a very successful investor by following a list of rules that fit on an index card—
  • Live below your means.
  • Invest early, often, and consistently.
  • Invest in low-cost, broadly diversified index funds.
  • Work to increase your income over time.
  • Enjoy life.
It needn't be more complex than that.
Great post. You really can't go wrong with these principles. The only thing to add is to "never bear too much or too little risk." Bond index funds are not zero risk (as clearly indicated on Vanguard's website), so you have to be sure to factor that into your risk profile. Perhaps figure out what you need in a 'no risk' safety net to minimize sequence risk. If you're retired and have social security, maybe you don't need a big safety net. Straying from 'owning the haystack' is not worth my time and energy. Just my 2 cents.
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