Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?

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AerialWombat
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Re: Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?

Post by AerialWombat »

nigel_ht wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 8:30 am I thought about teaching English overseas in retirement and spoke with a few folks that did that. It's possible if you completely don't care about office politics, favoritism, idiotic policies, micromanagement and craptastic pay. Since it wouldn't be for the money maybe I could do that. Probably I'd get pissed off and quit in a few months or a year.
I know a number of people that have done this not for the money, but for the visa. In some countries, such as Japan and Thailand, it’s very difficult or even impossible to obtain a long-stay multi-entry non-work visitor visa. So, it’s easier logistically to teach English part-time and live there on a work visa. The money is just for beer. :sharebeer
lostdog
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Re: Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?

Post by lostdog »

Wanderingwheelz wrote: Wed Oct 28, 2020 1:09 pm
Trader Joe wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 8:11 pm "Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?"

No, not at all.
A lot of people are who have a spouse who is still working full-time and/or wealthy parents. I know a few people who are doing it but as far as I know they don’t have a name for it.
My wife is working part time for the insurance. I'm 44 and switch between retired and semi-retired. I'll do food deliveries and temp jobs for some play money. I spend a lot of my time at the gym and my hobbies.
Brokerage: VTI+VXUS || Retirement: VTWAX || Short-Term: Cash+BSV || 33x Expenses
EnjoyIt
Posts: 5311
Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2013 8:06 pm

Re: Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?

Post by EnjoyIt »

nigel_ht wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 8:30 am
EnjoyIt wrote: Thu Oct 29, 2020 9:18 pm
KyleAAA wrote: Thu Oct 29, 2020 2:03 pm
mmmodem wrote: Thu Oct 29, 2020 7:19 am
KyleAAA wrote: Wed Oct 28, 2020 12:19 pm

Yeah. I have to think people who believe they will do service jobs as a low-stress way to make some money in early retirement have never done a service job. I think most people will find they are more stressful than their office jobs ever were.
Speaking as someone who worked at McDonalds I know first-hand what it is. It is easily magnitudes of order more (for lack of a better word) work than my desk job. And it pays very little. However, that's not what Barista or Coast FIRE is.
The point is that a lot of people have a a plan that isn't at all well thought out. They have this thing they see as a backup plan that in reality is going to be much more stressful and much less lucrative than what they're currently doing. I've seen quite a few people explicitly say they will just get an easy job at Starbucks if they need the money.
My father knew a neurosurgeon who quite and opened up a Persian rug store. He said his life was less stressful.
Is it still less stressful?

I know a guy who quit his engineering job to open an ice cream store. It was great for a while then started struggling. I haven't been there since covid so no idea if its even still open.

I thought about teaching English overseas in retirement and spoke with a few folks that did that. It's possible if you completely don't care about office politics, favoritism, idiotic policies, micromanagement and craptastic pay. Since it wouldn't be for the money maybe I could do that. Probably I'd get pissed off and quit in a few months or a year.

Yah, there are a lot of stuff that folks talk about that don't work as well in reality as they might think. FI and done is best. Working part time in the same high paying career until your can FI is second best. Working a couple extra years in a high paying job and then FI is better than trying to coast in on one of these alternates. At least its the devil you know AND you get paid a lot.
He used to say it was. I’m pretty sure he wasn’t doing it for the money but who really knows other than him and his family.
A time to EVALUATE your jitters: | https://www.bogleheads.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=79939&start=400#p5275418
stoptothink
Posts: 8678
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Re: Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?

Post by stoptothink »

flyingaway wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 8:47 am
Ron Ronnerson wrote: Wed Oct 28, 2020 3:43 pm
marcopolo wrote: Wed Oct 28, 2020 2:13 pm
Ron Ronnerson wrote: Wed Oct 28, 2020 2:06 pm I call it easing-off-the-gas-pedal but I suppose coast FIRE is pretty much the same idea.

Our path has looked like this:
We worked full time until about age 35 and then began working less even though it meant having less income.
Age 35: My wife started working 32 hours/week and I worked 30 hours/week on average.
Age 40: My wife reduced hours a little further to 30 hours and I stayed at 30 hours.
Age 43: My wife became a stay-at-home parent and I continued to work the same hours. She may or may not get a job in the future.
Age 55 (9 years from now): I may go down to around 20 hours a week. We should be able to do this financially but I like my job so I’m not sure if I’ll want to reduce hours.
Age 59-61: Retire

The concept of compound interest largely drives our approach. We have saved enough to coast as of now but adding a bit more padding, especially as I like my job, doesn't hurt anything.
If I recall correctly you are a public school teacher in the Bay Area. I am a bit surprised you are allowed to scale your working hours like that. Is that common for public school teaching positions?
Yes, I'm a public school teacher in the Bay Area and many teachers in the district I work for do job-shares. This is regardless of age. I am at an elementary school and job share partners can decide to split up duties anyway that they wish. For example, teacher #1 might work Mondays-Wednesdays and their partner, teacher #2, might teach on Thursdays and Fridays. Teacher #1 would get 60% of the pay that a full-time teacher earns and teacher #2 would get 40% of the pay.

At the school where I work, many teachers work part time. It gets better once you're age 55 and work at least 50% of the time. If you can check off those two boxes, you would earn retirement credit toward the pension as if you had worked full time during that year despite working less than full time. Employees are still responsible for making pension contributions as if they were working full time, though. Another potential advantage of reducing hours (and thus the salary) is that it might help one's children qualify for financial aid if they are in college. It can also possibly help someone qualify for the premium tax credit on the health exchange. My district doesn't contribute anything toward health benefits. This also surprises some but is not uncommon in the area.
I'm interested in knowing how students are reacting to different teachers to teach the same class on different days of the week, or that is not a consideration?
FWIW, my step-dad's district also does this. Instead of cutting back, he chose to teach an extra 5 classes/week for extra pay. Since most things are remote now, and he's well known in the area as a debate coach, he's also gotten offers from a handful of other schools (which he's turned down) to oversee their debate programs (remotely). Been pretty interesting to hear how teachers can make some side money, or cut down their hours, recently.
Wanderingwheelz
Posts: 849
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Re: Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?

Post by Wanderingwheelz »

lostdog wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:02 am
Wanderingwheelz wrote: Wed Oct 28, 2020 1:09 pm
Trader Joe wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 8:11 pm "Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?"

No, not at all.
A lot of people are who have a spouse who is still working full-time and/or wealthy parents. I know a few people who are doing it but as far as I know they don’t have a name for it.
My wife is working part time for the insurance. I'm 44 and switch between retired and semi-retired. I'll do food deliveries and temp jobs for some play money. I spend a lot of my time at the gym and my hobbies.
Yep. You’re able to be retired because your wife is willing to work so you have health insurance. There are a lot of men out there just like you.
EnjoyIt
Posts: 5311
Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2013 8:06 pm

Re: Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?

Post by EnjoyIt »

Wanderingwheelz wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:55 am
lostdog wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:02 am
Wanderingwheelz wrote: Wed Oct 28, 2020 1:09 pm
Trader Joe wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 8:11 pm "Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?"

No, not at all.
A lot of people are who have a spouse who is still working full-time and/or wealthy parents. I know a few people who are doing it but as far as I know they don’t have a name for it.
My wife is working part time for the insurance. I'm 44 and switch between retired and semi-retired. I'll do food deliveries and temp jobs for some play money. I spend a lot of my time at the gym and my hobbies.
Yep. You’re able to be retired because your wife is willing to work so you have health insurance. There are a lot of men out there just like you.
We talk about it a lot on this forum. Health insurance is a huge uncertainty and a huge expense. We used to have a really good health insurance plan bought on the open market prior to ACA. Since then, our costs have tripled and out of pocket max has doubled.

We are financially independent but still work part time. The future of health insurance is a significant concern to us. I personally prefer for most ACA to finally go away except for the pre-existing condition clause.
A time to EVALUATE your jitters: | https://www.bogleheads.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=79939&start=400#p5275418
lostdog
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Joined: Thu Feb 04, 2016 2:15 pm

Re: Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?

Post by lostdog »

Wanderingwheelz wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:55 am
lostdog wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:02 am
Wanderingwheelz wrote: Wed Oct 28, 2020 1:09 pm
Trader Joe wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 8:11 pm "Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?"

No, not at all.
A lot of people are who have a spouse who is still working full-time and/or wealthy parents. I know a few people who are doing it but as far as I know they don’t have a name for it.
My wife is working part time for the insurance. I'm 44 and switch between retired and semi-retired. I'll do food deliveries and temp jobs for some play money. I spend a lot of my time at the gym and my hobbies.
Yep. You’re able to be retired because your wife is willing to work so you have health insurance. There are a lot of men out there just like you.
There was a very small amount of guilt in the beginning but I put in 60+ hours a week as a Systems Engineer for 20 years. I'm grateful my wife doesn't resent me and she is working part time instead of full time. We're fortunate her healthcare employer provides full benefits to part time employees. Dividends from the taxable account cover the full time salary loss.
Brokerage: VTI+VXUS || Retirement: VTWAX || Short-Term: Cash+BSV || 33x Expenses
nigel_ht
Posts: 1558
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2019 10:14 am

Re: Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?

Post by nigel_ht »

EnjoyIt wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 10:01 am
Wanderingwheelz wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:55 am
lostdog wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:02 am
Wanderingwheelz wrote: Wed Oct 28, 2020 1:09 pm
Trader Joe wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 8:11 pm "Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?"

No, not at all.
A lot of people are who have a spouse who is still working full-time and/or wealthy parents. I know a few people who are doing it but as far as I know they don’t have a name for it.
My wife is working part time for the insurance. I'm 44 and switch between retired and semi-retired. I'll do food deliveries and temp jobs for some play money. I spend a lot of my time at the gym and my hobbies.
Yep. You’re able to be retired because your wife is willing to work so you have health insurance. There are a lot of men out there just like you.
We talk about it a lot on this forum. Health insurance is a huge uncertainty and a huge expense. We used to have a really good health insurance plan bought on the open market prior to ACA. Since then, our costs have tripled and out of pocket max has doubled.

We are financially independent but still work part time. The future of health insurance is a significant concern to us. I personally prefer for most ACA to finally go away except for the pre-existing condition clause.
The only way I've figured out is to move overseas and buy expat insurance. Then stay in or near countries that folks go for medical tourism (Singapore, France, Germany, etc). Easy to say, harder to do.
AlwaysLearningMore
Posts: 78
Joined: Sun Jul 26, 2020 2:29 pm

Re: Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?

Post by AlwaysLearningMore »

Cross FIRE is when a poor sequence of market returns, under-funding of FIRE contributions, or unanticipated post-FIRE expenses leading to an under-funded retirement account places the retired-early-retiree in the cross-hairs of an angry spouse. It is among the most dangerous sequelae of poor retirement planning.
Wanderingwheelz
Posts: 849
Joined: Mon Mar 04, 2019 9:52 am

Re: Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?

Post by Wanderingwheelz »

EnjoyIt wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 10:01 am
Wanderingwheelz wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:55 am
lostdog wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:02 am
Wanderingwheelz wrote: Wed Oct 28, 2020 1:09 pm
Trader Joe wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 8:11 pm "Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?"

No, not at all.
A lot of people are who have a spouse who is still working full-time and/or wealthy parents. I know a few people who are doing it but as far as I know they don’t have a name for it.
My wife is working part time for the insurance. I'm 44 and switch between retired and semi-retired. I'll do food deliveries and temp jobs for some play money. I spend a lot of my time at the gym and my hobbies.
Yep. You’re able to be retired because your wife is willing to work so you have health insurance. There are a lot of men out there just like you.
We talk about it a lot on this forum. Health insurance is a huge uncertainty and a huge expense. We used to have a really good health insurance plan bought on the open market prior to ACA. Since then, our costs have tripled and out of pocket max has doubled.

We are financially independent but still work part time. The future of health insurance is a significant concern to us. I personally prefer for most ACA to finally go away except for the pre-existing condition clause.
Yes, the high cost of health insurance is what keeps many people working past a pony he here they’d be able to retire, otherwise.

My wife and I saw the same explosion in our health insurance cost after the ACA. Being self employed or retired has its benefits, but one of them most certainly is not the cost of health insurance.
Wanderingwheelz
Posts: 849
Joined: Mon Mar 04, 2019 9:52 am

Re: Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?

Post by Wanderingwheelz »

lostdog wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 10:25 am
Wanderingwheelz wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:55 am
lostdog wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:02 am
Wanderingwheelz wrote: Wed Oct 28, 2020 1:09 pm
Trader Joe wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 8:11 pm "Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?"

No, not at all.
A lot of people are who have a spouse who is still working full-time and/or wealthy parents. I know a few people who are doing it but as far as I know they don’t have a name for it.
My wife is working part time for the insurance. I'm 44 and switch between retired and semi-retired. I'll do food deliveries and temp jobs for some play money. I spend a lot of my time at the gym and my hobbies.
Yep. You’re able to be retired because your wife is willing to work so you have health insurance. There are a lot of men out there just like you.
There was a very small amount of guilt in the beginning but I put in 60+ hours a week as a Systems Engineer for 20 years. I'm grateful my wife doesn't resent me and she is working part time instead of full time. We're fortunate her healthcare employer provides full benefits to part time employees. Dividends from the taxable account cover the full time salary loss.
Do you carry life insurance on your wife? Or are you figuring in her absence you’d find a job like hers?
Ron Ronnerson
Posts: 1898
Joined: Sat Oct 26, 2013 6:53 pm
Location: Bay Area

Re: Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?

Post by Ron Ronnerson »

flyingaway wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 8:47 am
Ron Ronnerson wrote: Wed Oct 28, 2020 3:43 pm
marcopolo wrote: Wed Oct 28, 2020 2:13 pm
Ron Ronnerson wrote: Wed Oct 28, 2020 2:06 pm I call it easing-off-the-gas-pedal but I suppose coast FIRE is pretty much the same idea.

Our path has looked like this:
We worked full time until about age 35 and then began working less even though it meant having less income.
Age 35: My wife started working 32 hours/week and I worked 30 hours/week on average.
Age 40: My wife reduced hours a little further to 30 hours and I stayed at 30 hours.
Age 43: My wife became a stay-at-home parent and I continued to work the same hours. She may or may not get a job in the future.
Age 55 (9 years from now): I may go down to around 20 hours a week. We should be able to do this financially but I like my job so I’m not sure if I’ll want to reduce hours.
Age 59-61: Retire

The concept of compound interest largely drives our approach. We have saved enough to coast as of now but adding a bit more padding, especially as I like my job, doesn't hurt anything.
If I recall correctly you are a public school teacher in the Bay Area. I am a bit surprised you are allowed to scale your working hours like that. Is that common for public school teaching positions?
Yes, I'm a public school teacher in the Bay Area and many teachers in the district I work for do job-shares. This is regardless of age. I am at an elementary school and job share partners can decide to split up duties anyway that they wish. For example, teacher #1 might work Mondays-Wednesdays and their partner, teacher #2, might teach on Thursdays and Fridays. Teacher #1 would get 60% of the pay that a full-time teacher earns and teacher #2 would get 40% of the pay.

At the school where I work, many teachers work part time. It gets better once you're age 55 and work at least 50% of the time. If you can check off those two boxes, you would earn retirement credit toward the pension as if you had worked full time during that year despite working less than full time. Employees are still responsible for making pension contributions as if they were working full time, though. Another potential advantage of reducing hours (and thus the salary) is that it might help one's children qualify for financial aid if they are in college. It can also possibly help someone qualify for the premium tax credit on the health exchange. My district doesn't contribute anything toward health benefits. This also surprises some but is not uncommon in the area.
I'm interested in knowing how students are reacting to different teachers to teach the same class on different days of the week, or that is not a consideration?
I don't know if I could accurately make a generalization about students' reactions. I'm sure it varies.

I'm at an elementary school where students are with the same teacher for most of the day. Having two different teachers may be challenging for some kids as it can be confusing and the continuity from day to day may not be as smooth. On the other hand, there can be some benefits to students as well. For example, I know a couple of teachers (in upper elementary) who divide the subjects that each teaches. For the reading period, one of the teachers shows kids how to read informational text closely and take notes from it while the other, on the days that she happens to work, focuses on reading children's literature with the class. Also, one teaches science on her days and the other focuses on social studies (since these subjects are not taught daily anyhow). The additional days off provide these teachers more time to plan and grade while having fewer subjects to prepare for.

In any case, input is not required from administration or families to set up the arrangement. Those under 55 years of age need to find someone to job-share with if they are interested in working less than full time. A lot of people, especially those with young kids of their own, do this. Once someone is 55, they can just tell the district they will be going part time and the district is responsible for finding them a job partner.
lostdog
Posts: 3581
Joined: Thu Feb 04, 2016 2:15 pm

Re: Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?

Post by lostdog »

Wanderingwheelz wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 12:35 pm
lostdog wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 10:25 am
Wanderingwheelz wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:55 am
lostdog wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:02 am
Wanderingwheelz wrote: Wed Oct 28, 2020 1:09 pm

A lot of people are who have a spouse who is still working full-time and/or wealthy parents. I know a few people who are doing it but as far as I know they don’t have a name for it.
My wife is working part time for the insurance. I'm 44 and switch between retired and semi-retired. I'll do food deliveries and temp jobs for some play money. I spend a lot of my time at the gym and my hobbies.
Yep. You’re able to be retired because your wife is willing to work so you have health insurance. There are a lot of men out there just like you.
There was a very small amount of guilt in the beginning but I put in 60+ hours a week as a Systems Engineer for 20 years. I'm grateful my wife doesn't resent me and she is working part time instead of full time. We're fortunate her healthcare employer provides full benefits to part time employees. Dividends from the taxable account cover the full time salary loss.
Do you carry life insurance on your wife? Or are you figuring in her absence you’d find a job like hers?
We carry no life insurance. No kids/dependents. Our portfolio is at 30x expenses. I would go on ACA or find a job.
Brokerage: VTI+VXUS || Retirement: VTWAX || Short-Term: Cash+BSV || 33x Expenses
marcopolo
Posts: 3849
Joined: Sat Dec 03, 2016 10:22 am

Re: Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?

Post by marcopolo »

EnjoyIt wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 10:01 am
We are financially independent but still work part time. The future of health insurance is a significant concern to us. I personally prefer for most ACA to finally go away except for the pre-existing condition clause.
Without veering into politics. If you just require insurance companies to cover all pre-existing conditions, and don't have some of the incentives/requirements for people to signup, how will that resolve the adverse selection problem? That is, healthy people just wait until they get sick to go buy insurance?
Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right.
AlwaysLearningMore
Posts: 78
Joined: Sun Jul 26, 2020 2:29 pm

Re: Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?

Post by AlwaysLearningMore »

marcopolo wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 1:02 pm
EnjoyIt wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 10:01 am
We are financially independent but still work part time. The future of health insurance is a significant concern to us. I personally prefer for most ACA to finally go away except for the pre-existing condition clause.
Without veering into politics. If you just require insurance companies to cover all pre-existing conditions, and don't have some of the incentives/requirements for people to signup, how will that resolve the adverse selection problem? That is, healthy people just wait until they get sick to go buy insurance?
See "jumpers" in Massachusetts (jump off plans when well; jump on when ill)
User avatar
Kintora
Posts: 73
Joined: Sun Jan 12, 2020 5:21 pm
Location: Fargo, ND

Re: Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?

Post by Kintora »

KyleAAA wrote: Thu Oct 29, 2020 2:03 pm
mmmodem wrote: Thu Oct 29, 2020 7:19 am
KyleAAA wrote: Wed Oct 28, 2020 12:19 pm
Armoured wrote: Sat Oct 24, 2020 11:19 am
flyingaway wrote: Fri Oct 23, 2020 9:50 am My son's roommate, after graduating from college and 15 months on a software developer job, just quitted his job, calming it is too much stressful. He plans to find an easy job at McDonald's.
If he does this, he will be coasting for quite some time.
The worst job I ever had as a teenager. Whenever I go through a drive through I am especially courteous; people can be so rude. However, I do wish I had known about investing back then...we would probably be FIRE now. Oh well, at least I can advise our children and hopefully they will listen.
Yeah. I have to think people who believe they will do service jobs as a low-stress way to make some money in early retirement have never done a service job. I think most people will find they are more stressful than their office jobs ever were.
Speaking as someone who worked at McDonalds I know first-hand what it is. It is easily magnitudes of order more (for lack of a better word) work than my desk job. And it pays very little. However, that's not what Barista or Coast FIRE is.
The point is that a lot of people have a a plan that isn't at all well thought out. They have this thing they see as a backup plan that in reality is going to be much more stressful and much less lucrative than what they're currently doing. I've seen quite a few people explicitly say they will just get an easy job at Starbucks if they need the money.
A few things that come to mind here.

1. What is a stressful job for one person may be low stress for another. We should each try to understand what we personally find stressful and not make any assumptions about how stressful something may be if we have never done it before.

2. Two different jobs of the same kind could be completely different stress levels. One coffee shop, you may have a jerk for a manager, lazy co-workers and many rude customers. Another coffee shop, you could have a great owner/manager and staff, very few rude customers, and a friendly community of regulars.

3. There is a huge difference between Coast FIRE and Barista FIRE. With Barista FIRE, you are already FI, and do not need the money. You are just doing it for some financial icing on the cake, fun, a way to spend some time productively or whatever. If it ends up being stressful, not fun, or whatever, you simply quit and move on to a different PT job or no job at all. Coast FIRE to me seems risky in that your new "low stress" job may turn out unexpectedly bad and you are not financially independent yet. I would rather keep my foot on the gas until FI and then have options.
EnjoyIt
Posts: 5311
Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2013 8:06 pm

Re: Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?

Post by EnjoyIt »

marcopolo wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 1:02 pm
EnjoyIt wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 10:01 am
We are financially independent but still work part time. The future of health insurance is a significant concern to us. I personally prefer for most ACA to finally go away except for the pre-existing condition clause.
Without veering into politics. If you just require insurance companies to cover all pre-existing conditions, and don't have some of the incentives/requirements for people to signup, how will that resolve the adverse selection problem? That is, healthy people just wait until they get sick to go buy insurance?
Frankly, I don’t know. All I can tell is that we have now sucks unless of course you are one of those people that either don’t have to pay or just don’t pay for health care.

I know exactly how to fix healthcare in this country. It would work except insurance companies and pharma would make a bit less money. It would also cause many Masters and MBA type jobs to disappear. If you want I can tell you via PM. No point in posting it here.
A time to EVALUATE your jitters: | https://www.bogleheads.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=79939&start=400#p5275418
Cramerica
Posts: 263
Joined: Sat Oct 03, 2015 5:30 pm

Re: Anybody here trying Coast FIRE?

Post by Cramerica »

Yes, I am basically doing coast fire.

I am a specialist physician and have gone part time early in my career.
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