Retirees, share your epiphanies..

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Keenobserver
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Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Keenobserver »

I m looking for some wisdom from retirees and asking are some of your realizations. What would you do differently? What would you approach differently not only in job/ career or finances, but in life in general now that you are retired and have opportunities to reflect.
babapanda
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by babapanda »

1. Live below your means
2. Have an asset allocation that allows you to stay the course
3. know your expenses more than your income

I've been retired for 2 years now and am glad to have found bogleheads 10 years ago. Probably would have become FI earlier if I would have known about Boglehead philosophy earlier in my career.
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TheTimeLord
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by TheTimeLord »

I am a big know yourself guy. Know what you want and forget about the rest of it. People get caught up in needing to have what other people want (keeping up with the Joneses) even though those things bring them little joy or happiness. It is your 1 life, fill it with what you want in it. Just make sure you are willing to accept the consequences if your lifestyle choices are unique like living in a van or having a dozen cats.
IMHO, Investing should be about living the life you want, not avoiding the life you fear. | Run, You Clever Boy! [9085]
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Sandtrap
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Sandtrap »

You will have stress if you doubt your portfolio, so take the time to do it right for what fits “you”, not what someone else thinks is right for you.

Adjust your allocation for RBD’s.

Having a larger portfolio is better than “good enough” when the market falls.

Money cannot buy health or youth or wisdom.
But lacking those and in debt and/or poverty is worse yet.

j🌺
Wiki Bogleheads Wiki: Everything You Need to Know
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Watty
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Watty »

One big thing is that your life will take unexpected twists and turns that you cannot really plan for. Some of them may seem to be good or bad when they happen but then things may work out differently in the long run.

When you look back at your life there will likely a few key semi random events that changed your life. Like if I had not be five minutes late to a ski class because the ski equipment rental line took so long then I would not have met my wife. If I was not once laid off I would not have gotten a new job that basically made my career.

I have also traveled enough that I have occasionally gotten out of the tourist areas, often by accident, so see that there are a lot of people who struggle to live a very basic lifestyle so that I can appreciate just how lucky the typical middle class American is. If you do not need to worry about keeping a roof over your head and food on the table then you are doing really well compared to most people in the world.
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Sheepdog
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Sheepdog »

Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 10:40 am What would you approach differently not only in job/ career or finances, but in life in general now that you are retired and have opportunities to reflect.
May I be philosophical? My personal thoughts may be different after having already lived happily for over two decades in retirement and into my late 80s.... Finances are important in retirement, of course, but your spirit is most important. Don't live alone. Alone at 70, 80, 90 would be awful for me and my health. Live with a person who shares your values and wishes, especially your time and space. Be prepared to lovingly assist each other as you age. Live together, travel together, share the things you each enjoy together.
And, say "I love you" often to all you care about....living companion, friends and family. Even if one of you leave before the other, your memories will carry you through.

Woof Woof
Time is the school in which we learn, time is the fire in which we burn.~ Delmore Schwartz
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TheTimeLord
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by TheTimeLord »

Sandtrap wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 11:28 am You will have stress if you doubt your portfolio, so take the time to do it right for what fits “you”, not what someone else thinks is right for you.

Adjust your allocation for RBD’s.

Having a larger portfolio is better than “good enough” when the market falls.

Money cannot buy health or youth or wisdom.
But lacking those and in debt and/or poverty is worse yet.

j🌺
+100
IMHO, Investing should be about living the life you want, not avoiding the life you fear. | Run, You Clever Boy! [9085]
rich126
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by rich126 »

Sheepdog wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 12:03 pm
Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 10:40 am What would you approach differently not only in job/ career or finances, but in life in general now that you are retired and have opportunities to reflect.
May I be philosophical? My personal thoughts may be different after having already lived happily for over two decades in retirement and into my late 80s.... Finances are important in retirement, of course, but your spirit is most important. Don't live alone. Alone at 70, 80, 90 would be awful for me and my health. Live with a person who shares your values and wishes, especially your time and space. Be prepared to lovingly assist each other as you age. Live together, travel together, share the things you each enjoy together.
And, say "I love you" often to all you care about....living companion, friends and family. Even if one of you leave before the other, your memories will carry you through.

Woof Woof
I've been a loner much of my life and it hasn't bothered me but as I get older (50s) it bothers me much more. I'm glad I have some friends and a great GF. While everyone is different, I think aging is tough (people getting sick, friends/family passing away) if you are alone and you don't have someone to help you deal with things.

I recently lost a long time friend who was only slight older than me. I wonder if he would be still alive if he had someone with him. Sometimes you need someone to talk some sense into you (e.g., don't ignore warning signs, get your routine exams/tests, etc.)
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Keenobserver
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Keenobserver »

Does anyone here regrett not having kids, or not havijg enoguh kids ?
sailaway
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by sailaway »

Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 1:28 pm Does anyone here regrett not having kids, or not havijg enoguh kids ?
Nope. It was definitely the right choice for us.
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by ScubaHogg »

Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 1:28 pm Does anyone here regrett not having kids, or not havijg enoguh kids ?
Initial impression to this question. After being married 13 years we had our first child about a year ago. Turns out we liked it much much more than anticipated. If we were younger (early 40s now) we could see ourselves having like 4. As it is we are going for one more then done.

So all in all, I’d say I wish we would have started earlier.
“Unexpected Returns dominate the Expected Returns” - Ken French
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Sandtrap
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Sandtrap »

Sheepdog wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 12:03 pm
Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 10:40 am What would you approach differently not only in job/ career or finances, but in life in general now that you are retired and have opportunities to reflect.
May I be philosophical? My personal thoughts may be different after having already lived happily for over two decades in retirement and into my late 80s.... Finances are important in retirement, of course, but your spirit is most important. Don't live alone. Alone at 70, 80, 90 would be awful for me and my health. Live with a person who shares your values and wishes, especially your time and space. Be prepared to lovingly assist each other as you age. Live together, travel together, share the things you each enjoy together.
And, say "I love you" often to all you care about....living companion, friends and family. Even if one of you leave before the other, your memories will carry you through.

Woof Woof
+1000
Perfect!
Thanks!!

Meow
Meow😺

j🌺
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celia
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by celia »

Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 1:28 pm Does anyone here regrett not having kids, or not havijg enoguh kids ?
Since none of our adult kids have kids of their own, we don't have grandkids, so having another one or two of our own would have certainly increased our odds. And since most of them don't live anywhere near us, sometimes I wonder who will take care of us as we've been taking care of our parents.

What I would have done differently is traveled more to see where our family origins were (in other countries) while the kids were young. I don't think any of us appreciate where we live compared to what our lives would have been like had some ancestors had not been brave enough to come to this country by themselves. I've also never been in favor of traveling with tour groups (that make your visit "easy" as you see the popular tourist spots). That just shows you such a small part of the world where you have little chance to interact with the locals, IMO.
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Vanguard Fan 1367 »

Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 1:28 pm Does anyone here regrett not having kids, or not havijg enoguh kids ?
The wife and I agreed before we got married that we wanted 4 kids. That happened. I do regret not realizing the truth of the saying, "childhood is like driving through a small town, you blink and it is over." If I had it to do over again I would like to be more on task with child raising.
Upton Sinclair: "It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends on his not understanding it."
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GerryL
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by GerryL »

Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 1:28 pm Does anyone here regrett not having kids, or not havijg enoguh kids ?
Solo. No kids. No regrets.
Regret about anything you cannot change is a waste of time, so I really, truly do not think about "what might have been."

EDIT: But in answer to the original question, and reiterating what others have said, living below your means and understanding your expenses is paramount. And health!
xxd091
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by xxd091 »

UK Boglehead
17 years into retirement (74) -all good cash wise -thanks to John Bogle
Could not have done it with out him!
Looking back was lucky it all worked out
Always put family first though our jobs were good and satisfying-and paid reasonably well
Had 3 kids early and close together -all are now married-8 grandkids -oldest grandkid 17!
Founded a tribe!
People get their most satisfaction from other people and that seems to have been the right way for us
Having enough time and money to raise successful kids always seemed to be the most satisfying project life offered
Luckily for us -that is the way it turned out
Now will they reciprocate in our old age!
xxd09
scrabbler1
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by scrabbler1 »

Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 1:28 pm Does anyone here regrett not having kids, or not havijg enoguh kids ?
Not at all. Being childfree is the most important and best decision I have made in my life. It enabled me to retire 12 years ago at age 45. My life would have been so much worse if I had kids.
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Sconie »

Hmm.....I've lived a blessed life and that includes 8 years of retirement.

Thinking about retirement, I'd say that in addition to finances and health, it's important to stay active, to stay involved with people and to be intellectually stimulated---refuse to grow "old." As one BH opined, maintaining your spirit is important. Then too, it is important to change how you feel about aging-----don’t let negative stereotypes become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Rather, continually work on improving your attitude and outlook----don’t think of aging as decline and disability, but rather, in terms of growth and opportunity.
I know you think you understand what you thought I said but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. - Alan Greenspan
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tennisplyr
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by tennisplyr »

Actually, looking back we've made some good decisions during our lifetime I think largely because we've lived our life in balance. Lived in a modest house, in a popular area outside of NYC with lots of job opportunities. Took reasonable vacations and owned sensible cars, life has been good to us. Have a daughter (now grandson) whom we adore (best decision of our lives).

Some suggestions: get a good education, live within your means, enjoy life along the way, save early if you can, try to see the good in everything (I know it's not easy). :)
Those who move forward with a happy spirit will find that things always work out.
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by MathIsMyWayr »

Vanguard Fan 1367 wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 1:59 pm I do regret not realizing the truth of the saying, "childhood is like driving through a small town, you blink and it is over." If I had it to do over again I would like to be more on task with child raising.
:!: :!: :!: :!: :!:
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by RadAudit »

Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 10:40 am I m looking for some wisdom from retirees and asking are some of your realizations. What would you do differently? What would you approach differently not only in job/ career or finances, but in life in general now that you are retired and have opportunities to reflect.
If I'd known, I would like to believe I would of done a better job at child rearing. OTOH, I've also come to realize that I'm probably not as influential on others as I think I am. Resolving those two ideas would be nice.
FI is the best revenge. LBYM. Invest the rest. Stay the course. - PS: The cavalry isn't coming, kids. You are on your own.
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Wilderness Librarian »

Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 1:28 pm Does anyone here regrett not having kids, or not havijg enoguh kids ?
Medicare age. Zero kids. Zero regrets. This is one of several reasons I bought long term care insurance when I was in mid-50s
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by meowcat »

Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 1:28 pm Does anyone here regrett not having kids, or not havijg enoguh kids ?
My wife and I got married fairly late in life so kids were kind of off the table. We both knew that, and shared in that. I don't mind not having kids but I get this feeling as I age that later, when I'm lying on my death bed, I'll look back and reflect, only to realize it would be my biggest regret in life.
More people should learn to tell their dollars where to go instead of asking them where they went. | -Roger Babson
flyingaway
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by flyingaway »

I am not smart and cannot beat the market, so I don' trade stocks or try to time the market.
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by carolinaman »

I increased my pension and SS a lot by working until FRA. However, we would have been financially fine if I had retired a few years earlier. This would have enabled us to do more traveling and other things before the limitations of old age began to creep into our lifestyles. Being too focused on finances may deprive you of more satisfaction in your life.

Another thing to consider is risk tolerance. Risk tolerance is greater while you are working because human factors is working for you. If a bad market hits just before retirement which happened to me, you can just work longer to recover from it. Once you retire, human factors is no longer working for you and it will be much more difficult to recover from major market losses. This can be a subtle thing that you only realize after major market losses.
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by flyingaway »

Sandtrap wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 11:28 am You will have stress if you doubt your portfolio, so take the time to do it right for what fits “you”, not what someone else thinks is right for you.

Adjust your allocation for RBD’s.

Having a larger portfolio is better than “good enough” when the market falls.

Money cannot buy health or youth or wisdom.
But lacking those and in debt and/or poverty is worse yet.

j🌺
This (a larger portfolio) needs to work for a few OMYs to achieve.
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Keenobserver
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Keenobserver »

meowcat wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 9:30 am
Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 1:28 pm Does anyone here regrett not having kids, or not havijg enoguh kids ?
My wife and I got married fairly late in life so kids were kind of off the table. We both knew that, and shared in that. I don't mind not having kids but I get this feeling as I age that later, when I'm lying on my death bed, I'll look back and reflect, only to realize it would be my biggest regret in life.
Appreciate your honesty.
delamer
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by delamer »

Unusual for a Boglehead, but I wished we’d saved less money.

We could have done more traveling with the kids or bought a beach place or purchased a primary home with more privacy.
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by AerialWombat »

flyingaway wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 9:37 am
Sandtrap wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 11:28 am You will have stress if you doubt your portfolio, so take the time to do it right for what fits “you”, not what someone else thinks is right for you.

Adjust your allocation for RBD’s.

Having a larger portfolio is better than “good enough” when the market falls.

Money cannot buy health or youth or wisdom.
But lacking those and in debt and/or poverty is worse yet.

j🌺
This (a larger portfolio) needs to work for a few OMYs to achieve.
+1

It was from reading this forum that I changed my attitude about ejecting at low altitude. My original plan targeted a low (by BH standards) nest egg number and then going leanFIRE, in the style of ERE or MMM. BH convinced me to buy a couple more rentals to pad future cash flow, do a series of declining-income OMY’s, and double my liquidable asset target. The revised plan is working out well, and I thank this forum for steering me in that direction.
flyingaway
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by flyingaway »

Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 1:28 pm Does anyone here regrett not having kids, or not havijg enoguh kids ?
With two children, at least we don't have to worry about where our money should or will go after we die.

Also talking about any achievements in life, I am a top scientist and highly respected in my field, but I would say that have two children and loving them is my most honorable achievement in my life.
flyingaway
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by flyingaway »

carolinaman wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 9:36 am I increased my pension and SS a lot by working until FRA. However, we would have been financially fine if I had retired a few years earlier. This would have enabled us to do more traveling and other things before the limitations of old age began to creep into our lifestyles. Being too focused on finances may deprive you of more satisfaction in your life.

Another thing to consider is risk tolerance. Risk tolerance is greater while you are working because human factors is working for you. If a bad market hits just before retirement which happened to me, you can just work longer to recover from it. Once you retire, human factors is no longer working for you and it will be much more difficult to recover from major market losses. This can be a subtle thing that you only realize after major market losses.
So having a more conservative asset allocation will mitigate the risk. That, of course, may needs a larger portfolio and a few more years of work. So the balance of time and money is really difficult to determine until you are well into the retirement.
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cinghiale
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by cinghiale »

I’m going to plagiarize from a recent post. To wit:
My biggest surprise was in realizing how satisfying “negative freedom” was, in recognizing and celebrating all the pointless, meaningless, and inane work-related tasks that I no longer had to do or ever consider. That realization was as equally satisfying as “positive freedom,” having the time and energy to do all the things I dreamed of doing. But what bliss it was to know that all that busy work was a thing of the past.
This is the difference between “freedom to” (No one can stop me from doing something) and “freedom from” (No one can force me to do this.). What an exquisite condition it is to realize that “No, thank you” is a complete sentence and that no further comment is needed.
"We don't see things as they are; we see them as we are." Anais Nin | | "Sometimes the first duty of intelligent men is the restatement of the obvious." George Orwell
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Sheepdog
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Sheepdog »

flyingaway wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 10:05 am
.......but I would say that have two children and loving them is my most honorable achievement in my life.
Thank you for that comment. I agree. My two sons were special in our lives as they grew and flourished as adults
They did not have children for me to share in my senior years, though. I don't know why, but I wouldn't dare to ask.
Anyway, I get my child loving fix today by reading to Kindergartners and volunteering at the Children's Museum (Go away Covid-19 so I can get back to that.)
Time is the school in which we learn, time is the fire in which we burn.~ Delmore Schwartz
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GerryL
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by GerryL »

Wilderness Librarian wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 9:16 am
Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 1:28 pm Does anyone here regrett not having kids, or not havijg enoguh kids ?
Medicare age. Zero kids. Zero regrets. This is one of several reasons I bought long term care insurance when I was in mid-50s
We librarians seem to think alike.
flyingaway
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by flyingaway »

Sheepdog wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 12:08 pm
flyingaway wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 10:05 am
.......but I would say that have two children and loving them is my most honorable achievement in my life.
Thank you for that comment. I agree. My two sons were special in our lives as they grew and flourished as adults
They did not have children for me to share in my senior years, though. I don't know why, but I wouldn't dare to ask.
Anyway, I get my child loving fix today by reading to Kindergartners and volunteering at the Children's Museum (Go away Covid-19 so I can get back to that.)
Same here. My wife sometimes urges them to have a family. I am very sure that my wife would retire immediately if we had a grandchild.
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Redlion »

Wilderness Librarian wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 9:16 am
Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 1:28 pm Does anyone here regrett not having kids, or not havijg enoguh kids ?
Medicare age. Zero kids. Zero regrets. This is one of several reasons I bought long term care insurance when I was in mid-50s
I believe most people do the opposite, They buy Long Term care Insurance to leave a sizable inheritance for their kids, If you end up with Alzheimer's its not going to matter.
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Redlion »

Wilderness Librarian wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 9:16 am
Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 1:28 pm Does anyone here regrett not having kids, or not havijg enoguh kids ?
Medicare age. Zero kids. Zero regrets. This is one of several reasons I bought long term care insurance when I was in mid-50s
I believe most people do the opposite, They buy Long Term care Insurance to leave a sizable inheritance for their kids, If you end up with Alzheimer's its not going to matter unless your plan is to leave to siblings or charity.
bighatnohorse
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by bighatnohorse »

I guess my first epiphany was that I had tomorrow off. And the day after that, and the day after that. . .
And each day I remind myself that I have the day off.
Old Guy
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Old Guy »

How did I ever manage to get up five days a week, and some weekends, and go into work.
bck63
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by bck63 »

Redlion wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 2:14 pm
Wilderness Librarian wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 9:16 am
Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 1:28 pm Does anyone here regrett not having kids, or not havijg enoguh kids ?
Medicare age. Zero kids. Zero regrets. This is one of several reasons I bought long term care insurance when I was in mid-50s
I believe most people do the opposite, They buy Long Term care Insurance to leave a sizable inheritance for their kids, If you end up with Alzheimer's its not going to matter unless your plan is to leave to siblings or charity.
They may want to guarantee a reasonably comfortable end of life in a decent facility, as opposed to a dumpy, smelly Medicaid nursing home (che odori????). It is sad we live in a world that treats the elderly with no means as trash. The poster may wish to avoid that, which could happen if they run out of money.
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by retire2022 »

My epiphany is my 89 year old mother dying recently not of Covid. We did not see eye to eye, her passing, I’ve realized no more nagging, last one who is related to me.

She didn’t tell me happy birthday this year, because she couldn’t.

We were hard scrabble, my father dying at 76 when i was 18, my brother dying at 25. Now single with networth 2.3 million I’m a Horatio Alger story, two time homeowner consider myself lucky. Covid has made me think about retirement.

No point in my case to work anymore, targeting my departure in the winter of this year.
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by tealeaves »

Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 1:28 pm Does anyone here regrett not having kids, or not havijg enoguh kids ?
I might have some regrets about not having enough stocks in retrospect. Concerning kids, hard to answer in a vacuum without knowing in general how your kids will turn out. I have kids and of course do not regret having them (to turn the question around), but to be honest while I'd love to have grandchildren I would not encourage my kids to have kids of their own, due to my pessimistic view of where the world is going. Hard question.
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Wanderingwheelz »

TheTimeLord wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 11:05 am I am a big know yourself guy. Know what you want and forget about the rest of it. People get caught up in needing to have what other people want (keeping up with the Joneses) even though those things bring them little joy or happiness. It is your 1 life, fill it with what you want in it. Just make sure you are willing to accept the consequences if your lifestyle choices are unique like living in a van or having a dozen cats.
Hey, wait a second! Living in my van has hardly any consequences. I’d even do it permanently if I didn’t have an, umm.. wife. :) Or maybe that IS the reason to do it? But I digress.

Don’t own a cat though. Let alone a dozen.
THY4373
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by THY4373 »

Sheepdog wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 12:03 pm Don't live alone. Alone at 70, 80, 90 would be awful for me and my health.
I think this is going to vary a lot by individual. I was married for 16 years and I much prefer my my post divorce solo life (I am currently in my 50s). I have zero interest in living with anybody just totally not my thing and I do not see this changing as I age. As for my health I am in much better shape now then when I was married (though I wasn't in bad shape then either).
Dottie57
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Dottie57 »

Sheepdog wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 12:03 pm
Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 10:40 am What would you approach differently not only in job/ career or finances, but in life in general now that you are retired and have opportunities to reflect.
May I be philosophical? My personal thoughts may be different after having already lived happily for over two decades in retirement and into my late 80s.... Finances are important in retirement, of course, but your spirit is most important. Don't live alone. Alone at 70, 80, 90 would be awful for me and my health. Live with a person who shares your values and wishes, especially your time and space. Be prepared to lovingly assist each other as you age. Live together, travel together, share the things you each enjoy together.
And, say "I love you" often to all you care about....living companion, friends and family. Even if one of you leave before the other, your memories will carry you through.

Woof Woof
Great post! But not possible for some of us who have not found that someone to live with.

I did watch my parents live as you say. It was quite wonderful. They died 3.5years apart.
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Toons
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Toons »

Sheepdog wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 12:03 pm
Keenobserver wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 10:40 am What would you approach differently not only in job/ career or finances, but in life in general now that you are retired and have opportunities to reflect.
May I be philosophical? My personal thoughts may be different after having already lived happily for over two decades in retirement and into my late 80s.... Finances are important in retirement, of course, but your spirit is most important. Don't live alone. Alone at 70, 80, 90 would be awful for me and my health. Live with a person who shares your values and wishes, especially your time and space. Be prepared to lovingly assist each other as you age. Live together, travel together, share the things you each enjoy together.
And, say "I love you" often to all you care about....living companion, friends and family. Even if one of you leave before the other, your memories will carry you through.

Woof Woof
Once again
Sheepdog.
A supberb post
Thanks
:wink:
"One does not accumulate but eliminate. It is not daily increase but daily decrease. The height of cultivation always runs to simplicity" –Bruce Lee
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Keenobserver
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Keenobserver »

retire2022 wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 3:56 pm My epiphany is my 89 year old mother dying recently not of Covid. We did not see eye to eye, her passing, I’ve realized no more nagging, last one who is related to me.

She didn’t tell me happy birthday this year, because she couldn’t.

We were hard scrabble, my father dying at 76 when i was 18, my brother dying at 25. Now single with networth 2.3 million I’m a Horatio Alger story, two time homeowner consider myself lucky. Covid has made me think about retirement.

No point in my case to work anymore, targeting my departure in the winter of this year.
Any regrets?
retire2022
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by retire2022 »

Keenobserver wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 8:52 pm Any regrets?
No, the only regret was i wished been borned into a different family, met a significant other and the right career which did not materialize.

Nevertheless i consider myself fortunate to be part of the 10% of this country to be financially independent.

I don’t miss having kids, there is enough of my DNA floating around the world. It is not easy living in this world.
Dead Man Walking
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Dead Man Walking »

I am fortunate in that I have a defined benefit pension that will cover all of my necessities. My portfolio is my long term care insurance. I’ve lived longer than many medical professionals would have predicted. When you have to face your mortality, you can actually be at peace. Once you achieve your peace, life is a gift that you can appreciate everyday. I enjoy the birds that frequent my feeders and have learned to tolerate the squirrels, raccoons, and rabbits that steal the food intended for my feathered friends. My wife doesn’t appreciate the chipmunks that excavate our foundation plantings and eat her flowers in addition to the birdseed. I view the chipmunks as the “investment professionals” on Wall Street.

DMW
Chuck107
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Re: Retirees, share your epiphanies..

Post by Chuck107 »

Setting my AA according to what percentage I am willing to go down in account value during a 50% drop.

I read it on these forums, and it made sticking to my AA a piece of cake.
Alas, I find moderation of this forum too restrictive for my tastes, farewell.
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