How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

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JustinR
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How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by JustinR » Wed Mar 27, 2019 8:15 pm

Say you're retiring at 40. Your annual expenses are $50k.

You've "won the game" and have amassed a large net worth. You don't want to take any more risk, so you go 100% cash and walk away from investing completely.

How much money would it take for you to be comfortable doing this?

$4 million? $7 million?
Last edited by JustinR on Wed Mar 27, 2019 10:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Gill
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by Gill » Wed Mar 27, 2019 8:20 pm

Never. I would always want to remain invested, certainly not all in cash or cash equivalents.
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by pdavi21 » Wed Mar 27, 2019 8:21 pm

Other way around, IMHO. If you have zero risk of losing, you should be close to 100% stocks. 50k per year is probably going to be covered by SS and pensions (if you made millions in your lifetime).
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GerryL
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by GerryL » Wed Mar 27, 2019 8:23 pm

There is no serious energy expended to being passively invested, and the odds are good that the $$ would grow. So why walk away? Much good can be done with the extra $$ if you don't want to use them for yourself.

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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by DonIce » Wed Mar 27, 2019 8:24 pm

Cash doesn't keep up with inflation. Your cash pile will be devalued by a factor of at least 3 by the time you're in your 80s, possibly a lot more than a factor of 3 if we get another inflation spike like in the 70s.

At the very least, you'll need to keep investing in short term treasuries or TIPS unless you have an 8 figure sum and want to see it needlessly decay away in value.

If short term US treasuries/TIPS are ok and you just need 50k per year, I'd say 2.5 million (50 years * 50,000, and your investments just match inflation).

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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by sambb » Wed Mar 27, 2019 8:29 pm

If you won the game with X amount of dollars, (at maybe 3% SWR), it might be best to invets or spend the rest more agressively

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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by RickBoglehead » Wed Mar 27, 2019 9:56 pm

$50k x 55 years = $2.75 million. Round to $4 million. Invest the rest
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by z3r0c00l » Wed Mar 27, 2019 10:00 pm

There is no amount, I would always strive to earn more. More money to leave to charities and family at a minimum, not to mention living better like seeing the world via business class and having a few vacation spots around the world. Plus, the best food and wine runs you a few thousand a day. Maybe after $1.2 billion I might give up, but at that point, wouldn't it be tempting to dabble in VC or try to start companies?

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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by Jags4186 » Wed Mar 27, 2019 10:11 pm

Assuming no return, a 100 year lifespan and 4% inflation, you’d need just shy of $12 million.

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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by willthrill81 » Wed Mar 27, 2019 10:12 pm

I agree with the gist of most of the above posts. If you've truly 'won the game', then you can afford to not need the 'security' of fixed income investments at all. Take a look at Warren Buffet, who is at least 90% stocks despite being one of the wealthiest people on the planet. And by the way, the majority of his wealth was gained in the last several decades of his life because of his high stock allocation.

Boy, I really can't stand that saying (i.e. 'winning the game'). :annoyed It's definitely not Bernstein's best work. Stocks are not a roulette wheel, and bonds are not a haven from all dangers. Take a look at U.S. bonds' real returns from 1977-1981 for proof of that.

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Last edited by willthrill81 on Wed Mar 27, 2019 10:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by BogleMelon » Wed Mar 27, 2019 10:15 pm

You can never be risk free. Cash comes with inflation risk certainty.
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by TravelGeek » Wed Mar 27, 2019 10:49 pm

pdavi21 wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 8:21 pm
Other way around, IMHO. If you have zero risk of losing, you should be close to 100% stocks. 50k per year is probably going to be covered by SS and pensions (if you made millions in your lifetime).
OP seems to be considering an early retirement scenario - age 40. In that case, I don’t think SS would get you $50k and most careers (entrepreneur, high tech, bank robber, international art thief, ...) leading to FIRE at that age probably don’t come with pensions.

I personally would not be at 100% stock. I would likely be comfortable somewhere in the rage of 40/60 to 60/40.

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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by zeal » Thu Mar 28, 2019 6:41 am

Don't think I would ever walk away either. If I've amassed a fortune in investments by age 40, I've done a great job--why stop now? If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by livesoft » Thu Mar 28, 2019 6:45 am

My assets would have to go below $150,000 for me to walk away from investing. Anything above that, then I am investing in the OP's scenario.
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by UpperNwGuy » Thu Mar 28, 2019 6:57 am

The title of this thread asks a silly question. If I had lots of money, I would keep on investing. I might increase my allocation from 60/40 to 80/20. I certainly would not hold years of living expenses in cash or cash equivalents.

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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by mmcmonster » Thu Mar 28, 2019 7:08 am

UpperNwGuy wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 6:57 am
The title of this thread asks a silly question. If I had lots of money, I would keep on investing. I might increase my allocation from 60/40 to 80/20. I certainly would not hold years of living expenses in cash or cash equivalents.
Agree. In fact, a more interesting question would be "How much $$ would it take for you to walk away from fixed income?".

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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by stan1 » Thu Mar 28, 2019 7:12 am

If I had $5M I'd put $1-2M into CDs/treasuries and put $3-4M into a 60/40 portfolio.

If I had $10M I'd put $2M into CDs/treasuries and put $8M into a 60/40 portfolio.

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market timer
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by market timer » Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:07 am

45 years of expenses in a TIPS ladder
Assuming 0% real return after tax
That works out to 45 years x $50K/year = $2.25M
Less if you factor in Social Security

Annuitize what's left around age 65

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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by TN_Boy » Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:07 am

JustinR wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 8:15 pm
Say you're retiring at 40. Your annual expenses are $50k.

You've "won the game" and have amassed a large net worth. You don't want to take any more risk, so you go 100% cash and walk away from investing completely.

How much money would it take for you to be comfortable doing this?

$4 million? $7 million?
No amount. Why would I *increase* the risk of the portfolio by going to all cash? For an all cash portfolio the risk is inflation.

I might go pretty conservative -- 20 to 30% equity, the rest some mix of nominal treasuries and TIPS (though more likely at 40 I'd go with at least 40% equities). But I see no reason to go with a riskier one-asset portfolio versus a better one. There is no downside to doing it right.

It still surprises me that people assert/believe any one asset portfolio is the low risk choice.

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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by JoMoney » Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:10 am

https://www.immediateannuities.com/
says that it would take just a little bit over $1 million for a 40 year old male to buy a $50,000 a year lifetime annuity.
I'd probably want double that to help with the impact of inflation, and expect social security assist with some of that after around age 70
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by onourway » Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:11 am

Others have driven home the point but I need to say it again. Cash is incredibly risky. One of your first money management lessons should be to understand fully why this is.

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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by knpstr » Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:14 am

JustinR wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 8:15 pm
You've "won the game" and have amassed a large net worth. You don't want to take any more risk, so you go 100% cash and walk away from investing completely.
Going to 100% cash would be very risky.
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by CyclingDuo » Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:14 am

JustinR wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 8:15 pm
Say you're retiring at 40. Your annual expenses are $50k.

You've "won the game" and have amassed a large net worth. You don't want to take any more risk, so you go 100% cash and walk away from investing completely.

How much money would it take for you to be comfortable doing this?

$4 million? $7 million?
If you retire at 40, best to plan to live until 90 to figure amount the amount of cash you would need to survive those 50 years as inflation eats away the value of your cash.

Use 72 and divide by the rate of inflation to see how long it would take for your cash to lose 1/2 of its value. If we use the Fed's target rate of 2%, it would take 36 years for your cash to be worth 50% of what it is today. So your annual expenses will slowly rise from $50K per year to $100K per year in such a scenario. At 4% inflation, your money would be worth 50% of what it is today in 18 years. At 5% it would be cut in half in 14.4 years. So on and so forth. Run your numbers on a such a scale using 2%, 3% to get the low end of what you would need and perhaps 4-6%+ to get the mid to high end range.

2% looks something like this for your first decade...

Year 1: $50,000
Year 2: $51,000
Year 3: $52.020
Year 4: $53,060
Year 5: $54,122
Year 6: $55,204
Year 7: $56,308
Year 8: $57,434
Year 9: $58,583
Year 10: $59,755
Year 11: $60,950
....
.....
......
Year 47: $126,817
Year 48: $129,354
Year 49: $131,941
Year 50 in 2069: $134,579

https://smartasset.com/investing/inflation-calculator

Total up your numbers to get the range you will need accounting for inflation. There is your cash pile you will need to have won the game and leaving it in cash to support your expenses.

Without adding it up, I'd guess $4M at the low end of inflation if it was sitting in cash and not earning any return.
Last edited by CyclingDuo on Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:19 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by Jack FFR1846 » Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:17 am

I would need $6,397,654.88
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by JoMoney » Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:23 am

Jack FFR1846 wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:17 am
I would need $6,397,654.88
I appreciate the precision in your multi-decade out projection of future expenses ;)
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by Jack FFR1846 » Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:24 am

JoMoney wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:23 am
Jack FFR1846 wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:17 am
I would need $6,397,654.88
I appreciate the precision in your multi-decade out projection of future expenses ;)
It's a simply hyperbolic projection to an inflection point leading to a parabolic draw down. :greedy
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by wolf359 » Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:37 am

JoMoney wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:10 am
https://www.immediateannuities.com/
says that it would take just a little bit over $1 million for a 40 year old male to buy a $50,000 a year lifetime annuity.
I'd probably want double that to help with the impact of inflation, and expect social security assist with some of that after around age 70
Just a thought to illustrate the impact of inflation.

$50,000 a year sounds reasonable because it is. It's around the average household income in the US after taxes. Many households have a budget close to this amount in 2019.

The 40 year old male may survive for 55 years (according to current life expectancy tables for a white male with this income).

55 years ago was 1964. In 1964, the median income in the US was $4,900 (per the Census).

If we had started this experiment in 1964, using an annuity to buy $4,900 for life, we'd be pretty much living off of social security now, even if the annuity had been doubled to provide $10,000/year.

Obviously, past results don't indicate what will happen in the future, and no one knows what inflation rate we'll have over the next 55 years.

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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by JackoC » Thu Mar 28, 2019 10:04 am

wolf359 wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:37 am
JoMoney wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:10 am
https://www.immediateannuities.com/
says that it would take just a little bit over $1 million for a 40 year old male to buy a $50,000 a year lifetime annuity.
I'd probably want double that to help with the impact of inflation, and expect social security assist with some of that after around age 70
Just a thought to illustrate the impact of inflation.
$50,000 a year sounds reasonable because it is. It's around the average household income in the US after taxes. Many households have a budget close to this amount in 2019.
The 40 year old male may survive for 55 years (according to current life expectancy tables for a white male with this income).
55 years ago was 1964. In 1964, the median income in the US was $4,900 (per the Census).
If we had started this experiment in 1964, using an annuity to buy $4,900 for life, we'd be pretty much living off of social security now, even if the annuity had been doubled to provide $10,000/year.
Obviously, past results don't indicate what will happen in the future, and no one knows what inflation rate we'll have over the next 55 years.
OK, but putting your money in a fixed rate annuity is not putting it in cash, it's basically putting it in very long term non-inflation adjusted bonds. Which have a yield that compensates the market's expectation of inflation plus a real rate. The 30 yr rate in March 1964 was around 3.9% , below the subsequent realization of inflation from 1964 to 1994 (~4.5% pa) or even 1964 to now (~3.7% pa), but not zero, which is the assumption implicitly made by just applying inflation to the annuity payment without considering that the upfront amount for the annuity was much less than 55 times the payment.

But even sticking to OP's actual idea of putting the money in *cash*, it still would not have been nearly 0% nominal return historically nor would that be the expectation now. It would be irrational to put all your life savings in a 0% interest checking account or paper currency, you would put it in safe interest bearing short term instruments. Between 1964 and 2018 T-bills returned 4.7% nominal pre tax. Note that the bond return in the first link for that period is 6.3%, but that's a rolling investment in 10 yr Constant Maturity, not investing in one 30 yr in 1964 (~3.9%) and rolling to another in 1994 to now (~4.3%), see second link. That can often cause a big difference in historical bond results. The mid 60's was a particularly bad time to lock in long bond rates just before inflation greatly exceeded expectations in late 60's-early 80's, then also missing out all the times inflation undershot the expectations incorporated in bond yields from the early 1980's onward. Anyway, for comparison the S&P500 total return in the NYU link for 1964-2018 was around 9.6% nominal pre tax.
http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/Ne ... retSP.html
https://www.forecast-chart.com/rate-treasury-1.html

My point is that yes there's inflation and over some periods in the past a negative real pre tax return on 'cash', over *most* periods a negative real after tax return on cash if you'd had $millions, which would also be the expectation as of now. However simply applying inflation to the initial amount is an implicit assumption that you earn zero nominal return on cash, which is possible in the future but seldom happened in the past and is well below the market expectation right now.

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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by DanMahowny » Thu Mar 28, 2019 10:54 am

$50k annual expense, $4M, 100% TIPS.

How could this fail?
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by wolf359 » Thu Mar 28, 2019 2:18 pm

JackoC wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 10:04 am
wolf359 wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:37 am
JoMoney wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:10 am
https://www.immediateannuities.com/
says that it would take just a little bit over $1 million for a 40 year old male to buy a $50,000 a year lifetime annuity.
I'd probably want double that to help with the impact of inflation, and expect social security assist with some of that after around age 70
Just a thought to illustrate the impact of inflation.
$50,000 a year sounds reasonable because it is. It's around the average household income in the US after taxes. Many households have a budget close to this amount in 2019.
The 40 year old male may survive for 55 years (according to current life expectancy tables for a white male with this income).
55 years ago was 1964. In 1964, the median income in the US was $4,900 (per the Census).
If we had started this experiment in 1964, using an annuity to buy $4,900 for life, we'd be pretty much living off of social security now, even if the annuity had been doubled to provide $10,000/year.
Obviously, past results don't indicate what will happen in the future, and no one knows what inflation rate we'll have over the next 55 years.
OK, but putting your money in a fixed rate annuity is not putting it in cash, it's basically putting it in very long term non-inflation adjusted bonds. Which have a yield that compensates the market's expectation of inflation plus a real rate. The 30 yr rate in March 1964 was around 3.9% , below the subsequent realization of inflation from 1964 to 1994 (~4.5% pa) or even 1964 to now (~3.7% pa), but not zero, which is the assumption implicitly made by just applying inflation to the annuity payment without considering that the upfront amount for the annuity was much less than 55 times the payment.
My intent was to illustrate the impact of inflation in a way that was relatable. I wasn't really trying to come up for or against using annuities, or any other investment vehicle. The way you think of a $50,000 budget today is roughly the way someone thought of a $4,900 budget in 1964.

My guess is that what is currently a reasonable median income will similarly look low 55 years from now if returns don't keep up with inflation. I was simply going back 55 years because it's easier to do that than to predict what median income will be that far in the future.

Any one trying to answer this question needs to find a way to address this issue in a way that would be effective over a 55 year timeframe (or at least, whatever timeframe is appropriate for the person responding.)

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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by helloeveryone » Thu Mar 28, 2019 3:12 pm

JustinR wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 8:15 pm
Say you're retiring at 40. Your annual expenses are $50k.

You've "won the game" and have amassed a large net worth. You don't want to take any more risk, so you go 100% cash and walk away from investing completely.

How much money would it take for you to be comfortable doing this?

$4 million? $7 million?
If I had way more than 25x annual expense I would actually probably just put it in 50:50 stock:bond index fund rather than get away from investing.

ie- win the lottery - invest in 50:50 and live off dividends or 4% withdrawal rule. if need be take cash out for whatever I need and pay cap gains tax.

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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by Clever_Username » Thu Mar 28, 2019 3:26 pm

I wonder whether I'd have a significantly increased willingness to take risk or significantly decreased willingness to take risk if I had much more than I need. I suspect it's the latter, but I wouldn't walk away, but rather I might end up in something like age+20 in bonds.
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by ohai » Thu Mar 28, 2019 3:30 pm

Here's another question that maybe is relevant. How much money would you need to have to lose the ability to invest? Would you prefer to have $3 million, but you can buy anything, or $6 million, but you can only buy 2.5% CDs?

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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by willthrill81 » Thu Mar 28, 2019 4:16 pm

mmcmonster wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 7:08 am
UpperNwGuy wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 6:57 am
The title of this thread asks a silly question. If I had lots of money, I would keep on investing. I might increase my allocation from 60/40 to 80/20. I certainly would not hold years of living expenses in cash or cash equivalents.
Agree. In fact, a more interesting question would be "How much $$ would it take for you to walk away from fixed income?".
But if Warren Buffett lost 90% of his wealth, he'd only have about $9 billion left. I guess that's good for a start, but you can't really live on it. :mrgreen:
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by azanon » Thu Mar 28, 2019 4:26 pm

JustinR wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 8:15 pm
Say you're retiring at 40. Your annual expenses are $50k.

You've "won the game" and have amassed a large net worth. You don't want to take any more risk, so you go 100% cash and walk away from investing completely.

How much money would it take for you to be comfortable doing this?

$4 million? $7 million?
$10,638,297 tax free. (I used VG ST TIPS Admiral yielding 0.47% and 50K for required income. I think I did my math right(50k/.0047))...... That's still not completely "risk free", but it's fairly close to it, right?

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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by willthrill81 » Thu Mar 28, 2019 4:58 pm

azanon wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 4:26 pm
JustinR wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 8:15 pm
Say you're retiring at 40. Your annual expenses are $50k.

You've "won the game" and have amassed a large net worth. You don't want to take any more risk, so you go 100% cash and walk away from investing completely.

How much money would it take for you to be comfortable doing this?

$4 million? $7 million?
$10,638,297 tax free. (I used VG ST TIPS Admiral yielding 0.47% and 50K for required income. I think I did my math right(50k/.0047))...... That's still not completely "risk free", but it's fairly close to it, right?
Not if you believe those who suggest that we're on the verge of people living for hundreds of years or longer due to medical breakthroughs such as the world has never seen before. If the real yield on TIPS were to remain negative for a few hundred years, you could deplete your TIPS ladder prematurely. So you might have to return to work at the age of 249, but that's assuming that you'll be able to find work that robots aren't doing by then. It's probably better to just keep working until you die (assuming that the robots don't make you obsolete first). That solves all sorts of problems. :wink:

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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by Trader Joe » Thu Mar 28, 2019 5:11 pm

JustinR wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 8:15 pm
Say you're retiring at 40. Your annual expenses are $50k.

You've "won the game" and have amassed a large net worth. You don't want to take any more risk, so you go 100% cash and walk away from investing completely.

How much money would it take for you to be comfortable doing this?

$4 million? $7 million?
I would never walk away from investing. I think about myself and my heirs.

dave_k
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by dave_k » Thu Mar 28, 2019 5:20 pm

No amount of money would make me want to stop taking any risk. In fact, with enough money, I would likely set aside some for taking even more risk, like angel investing.

I'm already doing a bit of that by going with HEDGEFUNDIE's 3x leveraged strategy with 5% of investible assets, and investing in a few private equity real estate deals with another 5% or so.

If I lost interest at some point, I'd pick a balanced fund of indexes that was right for me at the time (likely over 50% equities) and just let it do it's thing. I'd never go 100% cash.

It's not only about the need to take risk, but also about the ability to.

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Clever_Username
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by Clever_Username » Thu Mar 28, 2019 7:10 pm

willthrill81 wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 4:16 pm
mmcmonster wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 7:08 am
UpperNwGuy wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 6:57 am
The title of this thread asks a silly question. If I had lots of money, I would keep on investing. I might increase my allocation from 60/40 to 80/20. I certainly would not hold years of living expenses in cash or cash equivalents.
Agree. In fact, a more interesting question would be "How much $$ would it take for you to walk away from fixed income?".
But if Warren Buffett lost 90% of his wealth, he'd only have about $9 billion left. I guess that's good for a start, but you can't really live on it. :mrgreen:
He needs to work a few more years so he can have a lower SWR.
"What was true then is true now. Have a plan. Stick to it." -- XXXX, _Layer Cake_ | | I survived my first downturn and all I got was this signature line.

Dottie57
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by Dottie57 » Thu Mar 28, 2019 7:19 pm

I don’t think I would ever walk away from investing - unless I was broke.

xenochrony
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by xenochrony » Fri Mar 29, 2019 8:39 am

JustinR wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 8:15 pm
Say you're retiring at 40. Your annual expenses are $50k.

You've "won the game" and have amassed a large net worth. You don't want to take any more risk, so you go 100% cash and walk away from investing completely.

How much money would it take for you to be comfortable doing this?

$4 million? $7 million?
No amount of uninvested cash would be protected from inflation risk, thus I would never go to 100% cash. I would always invest to protect from inflation at the minimum. Even with 4 -7 million, I'd still likely take a very conservative risk with some modest % of the money in both bond and equity markets.

CULater
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by CULater » Fri Mar 29, 2019 9:23 am

Buy a Chick-fil-a franchise, hire somebody to run it, and head for the beach!
Faced with the choice between changing one’s mind and proving that there is no need to do so, almost everyone gets busy on the proof. ~ John Kenneth Galbraith

carolinaman
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by carolinaman » Fri Mar 29, 2019 9:24 am

I would remain invested in a simple portfolio, probably the Boglehead 3 fund portfolio. I would not be concerned about making money for myself but to put my money to work and use income for charities and philanthropic purposes. Buffett has given more than $30B to charity. Steve Case, AOL founder has established an interesting endeavor to fund startup companies in rural and overlooked areas of the country, https://www.businessinsider.com/steve-c ... ure-2018-5

It would be wonderful to put your excess assets to work in worthwhile endeavors like these. A simple passive investment strategy would require little oversight and could fund some great assistance to others.

sid hartha
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by sid hartha » Fri Mar 29, 2019 12:33 pm

I don't see any reason to walk away from investing.

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Dale_G
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by Dale_G » Sat Mar 30, 2019 12:24 am

I'm firmly in the never quit camp. But if over the next twenty years, cash out performs both equities and bonds, I reserve the right to change my mind. :D

I've been investing for 57 years. There were a number of times when cash wasn't much good, but it was still better than equities or bonds. Unfortunately, I was unable to identify those periods except in retrospect. With a few minor interruptions, we have had a long bull market since 1982. So recency rules.

Dale
Volatility is my friend

3funder
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Re: How much $$ would it take for you walk away from investing?

Post by 3funder » Sat Mar 30, 2019 7:55 am

I don't think I'd ever walk away from investing.

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