Retreat to cash

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birdog
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by birdog » Sat Jan 27, 2018 6:33 am

Stormbringer wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 4:09 pm
marge-g wrote:
Tue Jan 03, 2017 6:56 pm
Well, let's see what happens. Unconvinced by the feedback here, I've decided to get out of the market for a while.

....

For those of you that want the opportunity to say “I told you so.”, today’s market indexes at the time I placed the orders:

Dow: 19,900
S&P: 2260
NAS: 5441
VTI: 116.34
I'm going to bookmark this thread and refer to it every time I contemplate doing anything other than rebalancing to my planned asset allocation.

Dow: 24,810
S&P: 2629
NAS: 6762.21
VTI: 135.30

Plus about 2% yield in 2017.
+1

A true case study.

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ruralavalon
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by ruralavalon » Sat Jan 27, 2018 8:01 am

birdog wrote:
Sat Jan 27, 2018 6:33 am
Stormbringer wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 4:09 pm
marge-g wrote:
Tue Jan 03, 2017 6:56 pm
Well, let's see what happens. Unconvinced by the feedback here, I've decided to get out of the market for a while.

....

For those of you that want the opportunity to say “I told you so.”, today’s market indexes at the time I placed the orders:

Dow: 19,900
S&P: 2260
NAS: 5441
VTI: 116.34
I'm going to bookmark this thread and refer to it every time I contemplate doing anything other than rebalancing to my planned asset allocation.

Dow: 24,810
S&P: 2629
NAS: 6762.21
VTI: 135.30

Plus about 2% yield in 2017.
+1

A true case study.
Since January 3, 2017 total return of Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund Admiral Shares (VTSAX) is up 29.85%, and $10,000 invested has become $12,985.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started

Tarkus
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by Tarkus » Sat Jan 27, 2018 2:38 pm

Since January 3, 2017 total return of Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund Admiral Shares (VTSAX) is up 29.85%, and $10,000 invested has become $12,985.
By my calculation it's only up 6.3%, and $10,000 is worth $10,630. Did you mean "January 3, 2016"?

libralibra
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by libralibra » Sat Jan 27, 2018 2:58 pm

Tarkus wrote:
Sat Jan 27, 2018 2:38 pm
Since January 3, 2017 total return of Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund Admiral Shares (VTSAX) is up 29.85%, and $10,000 invested has become $12,985.
By my calculation it's only up 6.3%, and $10,000 is worth $10,630. Did you mean "January 3, 2016"?
LOL get your years straight. We are up 6.3% this year alone.

letsgobobby
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by letsgobobby » Sat Jan 27, 2018 2:59 pm

Tarkus wrote:
Sat Jan 27, 2018 2:38 pm
Since January 3, 2017 total return of Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund Admiral Shares (VTSAX) is up 29.85%, and $10,000 invested has become $12,985.
By my calculation it's only up 6.3%, and $10,000 is worth $10,630. Did you mean "January 3, 2016"?
Better check your math.

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munemaker
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by munemaker » Sat Jan 27, 2018 3:31 pm

marge-g wrote:
Tue Nov 22, 2016 10:26 am
Markets do not like uncertainty, and it would appear that with the new president, 2017 will bring a period of uncertainty on some major issues.

...Essentially betting that returns will be negative or less than 1%.
OP, you really called this wrong! No period of uncertainty in 2017! Not sure why you felt that way. You were betting on negative returns (or less than 1%). If you were invested in the Vanguard Total Market Index Fund (VTSAX), your return for 2017 was 21.17% and it is up 7+% YTD 2018. Just goes to show, don't invest with your emotions or feelings.

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bottlecap
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by bottlecap » Sat Jan 27, 2018 4:05 pm

This thread is a cautionary tale to tune out the media. They are experts on neither economics nor politics. Yet they sway us so much.

Nobody knows nothin'.

JT

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JoMoney
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by JoMoney » Sat Jan 27, 2018 4:16 pm

letsgobobby wrote:
Sat Jan 27, 2018 2:59 pm
Tarkus wrote:
Sat Jan 27, 2018 2:38 pm
Since January 3, 2017 total return of Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund Admiral Shares (VTSAX) is up 29.85%, and $10,000 invested has become $12,985.
By my calculation it's only up 6.3%, and $10,000 is worth $10,630. Did you mean "January 3, 2016"?
Better check your math.
I don't think the math is the problem, it's their calendar
Jan 3 2016 - to Jan 27 2018 46.29%
Jan 3 2017 - to Jan 27 2018 29.85%
Jan 3 2018 - to Jan 27 2018 6.3%
"To achieve satisfactory investment results is easier than most people realize; to achieve superior results is harder than it looks." - Benjamin Graham

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goodenyou
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by goodenyou » Sat Jan 27, 2018 7:33 pm

I am 60/30/10 (s/b/cash). I wish in hindsight I was 100% stocks. I sleep well at night with 10% cash. Thankfully, my marginal utility of risk is small since I am at or near "my number". I am reminded of the quote "pigs get fat, and hogs get slaughtered".
"Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge" | "The best years you have left are the ones you have right now"

itstoomuch
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by itstoomuch » Sat Jan 27, 2018 7:47 pm

^ Marge-g, said she was financially fine in her 1st post.
Likewise, we are fine and just want to avoid having to be the hog. I'll root around a bit and we have in RE and just about pigged-out.
Rev012718; 4 Incm stream buckets: SS+pension; dfr'd GLWB VA & FI anntys, by time & $$ laddered; Discretionary; Rentals. LTCi. Own, not asset. Tax TBT%. Early SS. FundRatio (FR) >1.1 67/70yo

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jmndu99
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by jmndu99 » Sat Jan 27, 2018 7:47 pm

I'm so happy I didn't take the route suggested by OP. I wasn't uncertain as I have a while to go before I need my investment dollars.

Just my 2 pennies

J

bling
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by bling » Sat Jan 27, 2018 8:13 pm

i hope OP eventually returns to tell us whether they got back into the market or is still waiting for the crash.

Luckywon
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by Luckywon » Sat Jan 27, 2018 8:14 pm

livesoft wrote:
Tue Nov 22, 2016 11:48 am
marge-g wrote:I have been seriously considering getting out of the equity and bond markets and retreating to cash during the next year. )
I love, Love, LOVE to read statements like that. That's a signal to me that the markets will be going up very nicely. Thank you!

There haven't been many statements like that in a while, but there have been quite a few just this week.

More to the point: There will be a great sucking sound as all the world's money comes into the USA.
Saw this post from Nov. 22, 2016 and have to tip my hat to you. Nicely called!!

MoonOrb
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by MoonOrb » Sat Jan 27, 2018 8:15 pm

“Little upside risk” I think is how this strategy was described. Interesting—I never would have done this myself but I don’t know that I would have really disagreed with the “little upside risk” statement last November.

libralibra
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by libralibra » Sat Jan 27, 2018 9:03 pm

Luckywon wrote:
Sat Jan 27, 2018 8:14 pm
livesoft wrote:
Tue Nov 22, 2016 11:48 am
marge-g wrote:I have been seriously considering getting out of the equity and bond markets and retreating to cash during the next year. )
I love, Love, LOVE to read statements like that. That's a signal to me that the markets will be going up very nicely. Thank you!

There haven't been many statements like that in a while, but there have been quite a few just this week.

More to the point: There will be a great sucking sound as all the world's money comes into the USA.
Saw this post from Nov. 22, 2016 and have to tip my hat to you. Nicely called!!
Some Nobel prize winner in Economics said the market would crash around the same time - so much for their brand I guess. Of course, there was another team of Nobel prize winners who started a hedge fund, drove it off the cliff, and almost took the economy with it - so you really can't believe any of the 'experts'.

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munemaker
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by munemaker » Sat Jan 27, 2018 10:29 pm

libralibra wrote:
Sat Jan 27, 2018 9:03 pm
Luckywon wrote:
Sat Jan 27, 2018 8:14 pm
livesoft wrote:
Tue Nov 22, 2016 11:48 am
marge-g wrote:I have been seriously considering getting out of the equity and bond markets and retreating to cash during the next year. )
I love, Love, LOVE to read statements like that. That's a signal to me that the markets will be going up very nicely. Thank you!

There haven't been many statements like that in a while, but there have been quite a few just this week.

More to the point: There will be a great sucking sound as all the world's money comes into the USA.
Saw this post from Nov. 22, 2016 and have to tip my hat to you. Nicely called!!
Some Nobel prize winner in Economics said the market would crash around the same time - so much for their brand I guess. Of course, there was another team of Nobel prize winners who started a hedge fund, drove it off the cliff, and almost took the economy with it - so you really can't believe any of the 'experts'.
You mean this guy?: "If the question is when markets will recover, a first-pass answer is 'never'," Krugman wrote at the time."

GratefulinNC
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by GratefulinNC » Sat Jan 27, 2018 10:45 pm

bling wrote:
Sat Jan 27, 2018 8:13 pm
i hope OP eventually returns to tell us whether they got back into the market or is still waiting for the crash.
I would guess she is still in cash. At the very least, she no longer frequents Bogleheads. Otherwise, we would have heard a response by now.

wfrobinette
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by wfrobinette » Tue Jan 30, 2018 3:44 pm

james22 wrote:
Sat Sep 16, 2017 1:23 am
If frantic day-to-day attention to market movements serves to do anything, it is to convince investors that they cannot afford to miss any short-term rally; that they can't afford to miss the latest utterance from the Fed; that they can't afford to miss the latest “hot play” offered up to the masses. It does not, however, serve to earn investors sustainable profits.

...

At the other extreme is Papa Van Winkle, asleep beneath a shady tree. He's made just 11 trades in a half-century. He falls asleep for years at a time. I'd never recommend his approach in practice – there are far better ones, with less risk. Also, it would be excruciatingly difficult to live through at times, if you were awake, because it would seem that you were missing opportunities of a lifetime.

Nevertheless, old Rip has come out pretty well over the years. He's outperformed the S&P 500 since 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, and even over the past decade. And though he's earned over three times what the S&P 500 has achieved, including dividends, his deepest pullback over that period has been less than half of what the S&P 500 has periodically lost. He slept through most of the 1973-74 bear market, through the '87 crash, through the 2000-2002 bear market. Shhhhh. He's asleep now too.

What's Papa Van Winkle's secret? Simple. He doesn't overstay his welcome in overvalued markets.

Once the price/peak earnings multiple on the S&P 500 hits 19, he looks for minimal confirmation to get out – a decline in the S&P 500 below its 10-week moving average, and investment advisory bearishness (Investors' Intelligence) below 30% bears. Then he goes to sleep. Once he does, he snores through everything – even improvements in valuations – until the S&P 500 drops 30% from its highs on a weekly closing basis. No less. Sometimes he sleeps for years on end. Sometimes he misses enormous short-term advances. No matter. They're never retained by investors anyway.

Again, I wouldn't recommend old Rip's strategy in practice. It would be psychologically impossible to follow, and there are far better ones that capture greater gains with more controlled risk.

Still, the Rip Van Winkle strategy illustrates an essential point: advances in overvalued markets are regularly given back at great cost to investors who overstay, and can be avoided at no cost to long-term investors. I believe that there are ways to capture a reasonable portion of such advances at controlled risk. But there are also times when the attempt to capture speculative gains in overvalued markets would demand too much precision and leave risks poorly controlled. At those times, investors can and should sleep through them (or at least hedge their portfolios), comfortable that any missed, incremental market gains are unlikely to be retained over time.


http://www.hussmanfunds.com/wmc/wmc070220.htm
Hussmans funds have done terrible since inception. Would love to see his long term results.

WhiteMaxima
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by WhiteMaxima » Tue Jan 30, 2018 3:50 pm

One always needs some cash reserve. During financial crisis, you can buy equity for cheap.

TN_Boy
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by TN_Boy » Tue Jan 30, 2018 4:40 pm

wfrobinette wrote:
Tue Jan 30, 2018 3:44 pm
james22 wrote:
Sat Sep 16, 2017 1:23 am
If frantic day-to-day attention to market movements serves to do anything, it is to convince investors that they cannot afford to miss any short-term rally; that they can't afford to miss the latest utterance from the Fed; that they can't afford to miss the latest “hot play” offered up to the masses. It does not, however, serve to earn investors sustainable profits.

...

At the other extreme is Papa Van Winkle, asleep beneath a shady tree. He's made just 11 trades in a half-century. He falls asleep for years at a time. I'd never recommend his approach in practice – there are far better ones, with less risk. Also, it would be excruciatingly difficult to live through at times, if you were awake, because it would seem that you were missing opportunities of a lifetime.

Nevertheless, old Rip has come out pretty well over the years. He's outperformed the S&P 500 since 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, and even over the past decade. And though he's earned over three times what the S&P 500 has achieved, including dividends, his deepest pullback over that period has been less than half of what the S&P 500 has periodically lost. He slept through most of the 1973-74 bear market, through the '87 crash, through the 2000-2002 bear market. Shhhhh. He's asleep now too.

What's Papa Van Winkle's secret? Simple. He doesn't overstay his welcome in overvalued markets.

Once the price/peak earnings multiple on the S&P 500 hits 19, he looks for minimal confirmation to get out – a decline in the S&P 500 below its 10-week moving average, and investment advisory bearishness (Investors' Intelligence) below 30% bears. Then he goes to sleep. Once he does, he snores through everything – even improvements in valuations – until the S&P 500 drops 30% from its highs on a weekly closing basis. No less. Sometimes he sleeps for years on end. Sometimes he misses enormous short-term advances. No matter. They're never retained by investors anyway.

Again, I wouldn't recommend old Rip's strategy in practice. It would be psychologically impossible to follow, and there are far better ones that capture greater gains with more controlled risk.

Still, the Rip Van Winkle strategy illustrates an essential point: advances in overvalued markets are regularly given back at great cost to investors who overstay, and can be avoided at no cost to long-term investors. I believe that there are ways to capture a reasonable portion of such advances at controlled risk. But there are also times when the attempt to capture speculative gains in overvalued markets would demand too much precision and leave risks poorly controlled. At those times, investors can and should sleep through them (or at least hedge their portfolios), comfortable that any missed, incremental market gains are unlikely to be retained over time.


http://www.hussmanfunds.com/wmc/wmc070220.htm
Hussmans funds have done terrible since inception. Would love to see his long term results.
Spectacularly, amazingly bad. I won't post the links, but if you google something like "Hussman Strategic Growth Returns" you can find articles describing the performance in what used to be his flagship "growth" fund. The fund, which used to have several billion in assets, is down to about 300 million now.

Shareholders in Hussman Strategic Growth have been subject to a total catastrophe; a 10 year return of -6.63 .... annually.

His Strategic Total Return has done better, perhaps (I haven't actually checked) because it holds some bonds and other assets which were not subject to his utterly disastrous stock hedging strategies during a bull market.

Given his dismal track record over a long period of time (17 years total) it amazes me anyone would cite him as an authority on anything, including stock valuations. He has implemented strategies based on his beliefs, and the results with real money are incredibly bad.

wfrobinette
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by wfrobinette » Wed Jan 31, 2018 11:16 am

So much for market timing!

james22
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by james22 » Fri Feb 02, 2018 1:46 am

1. Hussman has done well thru the two complete market cycles ending in 2000 and 2008. This third cycle is yet incomplete.

2. There are times when Papa Van Winkle's results would have looked spectacularly, amazingly bad too.

Which is why:

... it would be excruciatingly difficult to live through at times, if you were awake, because it would seem that you were missing opportunities of a lifetime.

This is one of those times.

I believe the worm will turn and gains made in today's overvalued market will be given back. But we'll see.
This whole episode is likely to end so badly that future children will learn about it in school and shake their heads in wonder at the rank stupidity of it all... Hussman

david1082b
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by david1082b » Fri Feb 02, 2018 2:16 am

james22 wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 1:46 am
1. Hussman has done well thru the two complete market cycles ending in 2000 and 2008. This third cycle is yet incomplete.
Hussman Strategic Growth Fund HSGFX has returned a total of 9% since July 2000, so it would take a monumental turnaround by the end of the next market cycle to get more gains than could have been had from CDs, savings bonds or total bond market. Strategic Growth's total return chart is astonishingly symmetrical, I mean you couldn't get those returns if you tried, I don't know how Mr Hussman does it. HSGFX from inception versus Total Bond VBMFX for comparison: http://quotes.morningstar.com/chart/fun ... A%5B%5D%7D

On Papa Van Winkle:
I'd never recommend his approach in practice – there are far better ones, with less risk. [...] He's outperformed the S&P 500 since 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, and even over the past decade. [...] I wouldn't recommend old Rip's strategy in practice. It would be psychologically impossible to follow, and there are far better ones that capture greater gains with more controlled risk.
Mr Hussman, if only you had followed Papa Van Winkle's trades, you too would have outperformed the S&P 500 from 2007 to 2017 instead of posting a 40% loss. Who needs to go for "greater gains" than the S&P 500 though? Isn't that a little over-stretching?

B. Wellington
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by B. Wellington » Fri Feb 02, 2018 7:32 am

goodenyou wrote:
Sat Jan 27, 2018 7:33 pm
I am 60/30/10 (s/b/cash). I wish in hindsight I was 100% stocks. I sleep well at night with 10% cash. Thankfully, my marginal utility of risk is small since I am at or near "my number". I am reminded of the quote "pigs get fat, and hogs get slaughtered".
^^^We are in the same boat gooenyou. Very close to your AA although less in cash. We are very, very close to being able to "retire" and I really try not to get greedy here.

To be able to walk away from my career after all these years of hard work, diligent saving, and investing just is not worth the risk for us... :beer

cutehumor
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by cutehumor » Sat Feb 03, 2018 4:44 pm

bling wrote:
Sat Jan 27, 2018 8:13 pm
i hope OP eventually returns to tell us whether they got back into the market or is still waiting for the crash.
So she can be tarred and feathered? I'm at 25.82% one year return in my portfolio and that's counting the big drop the last week. This thread should be a sticky.

TN_Boy
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by TN_Boy » Sat Feb 03, 2018 7:52 pm

james22 wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 1:46 am
1. Hussman has done well thru the two complete market cycles ending in 2000 and 2008. This third cycle is yet incomplete.

2. There are times when Papa Van Winkle's results would have looked spectacularly, amazingly bad too.

Which is why:

... it would be excruciatingly difficult to live through at times, if you were awake, because it would seem that you were missing opportunities of a lifetime.

This is one of those times.

I believe the worm will turn and gains made in today's overvalued market will be given back. But we'll see.
How do you define "has done well?" If HSGFX has "done well," I would hate to see "done badly."

Also, what do you mean by "market cycles ending in 2000?" HSGFX did not exist in 2000. I assume you mean timeframe covering the crash starting in 2000 until now? I.e. 17 years with two crashes.

You can look at charts of HSGFX versus the total stock market, and it is difficult to see how anybody could think HSGFX did "well." Per morningstar HSGFX's 15 year record is -2.09 per year. Total stock market (in the form of vanguard's VTI) over 15 years +10.83 yearly.

I mean, even if you deeply believe market timing works, Hussman's record indicates the exact opposite!

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willthrill81
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by willthrill81 » Sat Feb 03, 2018 7:58 pm

WhiteMaxima wrote:
Tue Jan 30, 2018 3:50 pm
One always needs some cash reserve. During financial crisis, you can buy equity for cheap.
This makes some intuitive sense, but the data are clear that over the long-term, the cash has merely been a drag on returns.

In the same vein, the idea that one can achieve higher long-term absolute returns with portfolios like 80/20 than 100/0 due to a 'rebalancing bonus' is false as well. Note that this practice can improve risk-adjusted returns though.
“It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to.” J.R.R. Tolkien,The Lord of the Rings

dbr
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by dbr » Sun Feb 04, 2018 8:57 am

willthrill81 wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 7:58 pm
WhiteMaxima wrote:
Tue Jan 30, 2018 3:50 pm
One always needs some cash reserve. During financial crisis, you can buy equity for cheap.
This makes some intuitive sense, but the data are clear that over the long-term, the cash has merely been a drag on returns.

In the same vein, the idea that one can achieve higher long-term absolute returns with portfolios like 80/20 than 100/0 due to a 'rebalancing bonus' is false as well. Note that this practice can improve risk-adjusted returns though.
Right. It just doesn't happen on average that staying out of stocks in order to buy cheap actually would work. To do it not on average you have to be able to figure out exactly when to get in and when to get out and even then the market may not offer the opportunity that is needed. It is indeed a classic case of something vaguely intuitive being wrong.

SimplicityNow
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by SimplicityNow » Sun Feb 04, 2018 10:43 am

cutehumor wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 4:44 pm
bling wrote:
Sat Jan 27, 2018 8:13 pm
i hope OP eventually returns to tell us whether they got back into the market or is still waiting for the crash.
So she can be tarred and feathered? I'm at 25.82% one year return in my portfolio and that's counting the big drop the last week. This thread should be a sticky.
No not tarred and feathered. Though it would be interesting for her to share her thinking during the period and if her resolve wavered at all. Maybe she decided she made a mistake and she got back in. Maybe she is still firm that she made the right decision. Maybe she views last week as the beginning of a big drop so she can get back in.

itstoomuch
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by itstoomuch » Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:42 am

dbr wrote: Right. It just doesn't happen on average that staying out of stocks in order to buy cheap actually would work. To do it not on average you have to be able to figure out exactly when to get in and when to get out and even then the market may not offer the opportunity that is needed. It is indeed a classic case of something vaguely intuitive being wrong.


Close may be is good enough. :annoyed
Last edited by itstoomuch on Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:48 am, edited 1 time in total.
Rev012718; 4 Incm stream buckets: SS+pension; dfr'd GLWB VA & FI anntys, by time & $$ laddered; Discretionary; Rentals. LTCi. Own, not asset. Tax TBT%. Early SS. FundRatio (FR) >1.1 67/70yo

dbr
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by dbr » Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:47 am

itstoomuch wrote:
Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:42 am
dbr wrote: Right. It just doesn't happen on average that staying out of stocks in order to buy cheap actually would work. To do it not on average you have to be able to figure out exactly when to get in and when to get out and even then the market may not offer the opportunity that is needed. It is indeed a classic case of something vaguely intuitive being wrong.


Close may be good enough.
If it can be done close would be good enough, but it remains to be proved that any close enough exists.

itstoomuch
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by itstoomuch » Sun Feb 04, 2018 12:04 pm

^ if I can get close to a BP of 140/80 instead of 180/90, I'd be very pleased. I've been 210/100 and that is close to my tolerance. I assure everyone, I'd rather be close to the former than the latter.
Rev012718; 4 Incm stream buckets: SS+pension; dfr'd GLWB VA & FI anntys, by time & $$ laddered; Discretionary; Rentals. LTCi. Own, not asset. Tax TBT%. Early SS. FundRatio (FR) >1.1 67/70yo

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climber2020
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by climber2020 » Sat Aug 11, 2018 8:46 am

Reviving this thread to hear of any updates of how this whole endeavor is going.

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ruralavalon
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by ruralavalon » Sat Aug 11, 2018 9:05 am

climber2020 wrote:
Sat Aug 11, 2018 8:46 am
Reviving this thread to hear of any updates of how this whole endeavor is going.
Since November 22, 2016 (when this thread started) total return of Vanguard Total Stock Index Fund Admiral Shares (VTSAX) is up 33%, and $10,000 invested has turned in to $13,307.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started

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munemaker
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by munemaker » Sat Aug 11, 2018 9:23 am

ruralavalon wrote:
Sat Aug 11, 2018 9:05 am
climber2020 wrote:
Sat Aug 11, 2018 8:46 am
Reviving this thread to hear of any updates of how this whole endeavor is going.
Since November 22, 2016 (when this thread started) total return of Vanguard Total Stock Index Fund Admiral Shares (VTSAX) is up 33%, and $10,000 invested has turned in to $13,307.
If we only knew that back in November 22, 2016, I would have mortgaged my house and bet the farm.

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friar1610
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Re: Retreat to cash

Post by friar1610 » Sat Aug 11, 2018 9:38 am

Woulda, coulda, shoulda... Or is it wooda, cooda, shooda...?
Friar1610

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