Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

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Boglenaut
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Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by Boglenaut »

Like most people here that spend a lot more time on investing than the Boglehead-style investing requires, I've researched plenty of funds that I don't own. Usually the fund gets my interest, but for one reason or the other I decided not to own.

Here are some of my favorite funds that I currently don't own:

Global ex-U.S. Real Estate Index Admiral Shares - Sounds very exotic and a natural diversifier. While .32% ER is low for this type of fund, the .25% buy and .25% redemption fees make me hesitate. I know that if I bought it, the .32 ER would nag at me (my average ER =.095%). Also, this fund seems overly concentrated in Asia. Finally, by the time I broke it out from my REIT allocation, it would be a very small part of my AA (probably 1%). And of course, this fund does not sit well in Taxable (heavy distributions) nor in Tax-Advantaged (Lost Foreign Tax Credit). So goodbye to my Hong Kong Skyscrapers.

Total International Bond Index Admiral Shares - My bonds are very heavily concentrated in the US, and it makes logical sense to diversify bonds internationally just like stocks. And Vanguard wrote a very good research paper supporting it. But at .2% ER, I have to justify paying double my current ER. With a SEC Yield of 1.60%, I don't see any special compelling reason to jump in. Add to that hedging costs (I'd prefer not hedged for currency diversification). My aggregate bond fund already has some intl, as well as a tiny portion as part of some other funds.

Emerging Markets Government Bond Index Admiral Shares - This again sounds like a natural diversifier, but with a .75% purchase fee and .35% ER, it seems like a lot to pay for a 4.87% yield. It's also a lot of risk for small upside gain. Finally, I'd prefer unhedged with no hedging cost.

Frontier Markets (various ETFs) - How exciting is that! It's like EM was 25 years ago. A great diversifier with huge gains potential. I've been watching these for quite some time, but so far cannot find a suitable vehicle to invest in. They seem to have high cost, low liquidity, and tend to be heavily invested in just a few countries or industries, or really be EM funds in disguise. Also, I generally avoid ETF's, and the most viable options in this space are ETFs.

High-Yield Corporate Admiral Shares - This one I may actually do someday. My investment policy document allows me to do it (but I have to count it half toward my equity AA). The ER of .13 is within my comfort zone, and it is a Vanguard fund. But to get the Admiral Shares, I'd have to take to big of a chunk... so I need my portfolio to grow a bit more. Also, I'd have to bring an IRA in from another company, and that has some inertia. At 4.45% SEC Yield, I do not see urgency in this. I will evaluate when my portfolio hits a certain size. In the meantime, I'll settle for reading Rick and Larry debate it.

So for now my most exotic items is a very small EM tilt after Total Intl, some US REIT, some TIPs, and a small cap tilt on Total US. I used to own Small Cap International, but dropped that when I got Tot Intl. I always hear Taylor's voice reminding me to keep it simple and that prevents me from adding too many more when I get tempted.

What are your favorite funds you don't own?
stan1
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by stan1 »

I would consider a DFA small value fund if it were available in my 401K without paying any additional advisory fees. I don't have access to DFA so I don't own their funds.
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by SpringMan »

Maybe LSBDX, Loomis Sayles Bond, expense ratio is around .63%. Dan Fuss has a very good reputation as a bond fund manager although he is getting up there in age. I used to own this multi-sector bond fund but have not owned it for a while. I guess it is still on my watch list. Vanguard does not offer a multi-sector bond fund.
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by RNJ »

Dodge and Cox International.
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by Boglenaut »

Someone once mentioned a Bridgeway mico-cap fund here that looked very interesting. But I know anytime a fund gets >.5% ER that it'll nag at me, even if it is a good ER for what the fund does. So I learned enough about myself to not buy anything over .5%.
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by Boglenaut »

While not a fund, another area I avoided was peer-to-peer lending. The concept is fascinating and it could be fun, but fees seemed high and I would take it personally when someone defaulted. Also, it was never really clear what tax paperwork would be like. I am also not sure if it was available in my state or not.
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by G-Money »

International Value Index. I like the idea behind Trev H's simplified 4 fund slice and dice. But there are no good vehicles for large cap international value. The Vanguard fund is not an index fund, has an ER on the high side, is light on emerging markets and Canada, and isn't particularly value-y. I considered EFV, which is more value-y, but it has roughly the same ER as Vanguard International Value, and it only tracks EAFE stocks. I use Vanguard Total International instead.

international Small Cap Value. Same problems as above, only more so. I use VFSVX/VSS.

intermediate Term Bond Index Fund (VBILX). I'd prefer to use this bond fund for fixed income. But due to limited attractive options in my 401(k), I use the Vanguard Balanced Index Fund there (the bond portion tracks TBM). The rest of my fixed income is moving to the new PenFed CDs. At this point, any additional fixed income would probably go to the Vanguard Intermediate Term Corporate Bond Index Fund (VICSX) since so much of my fixed income has no credit risk. But if I were retired and consolidated all of my accounts at Vanguard, I'd probably choose VBILX.
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by midareff »

Boglenaut wrote:Like most people here that spend a lot more time on investing than the Boglehead-style investing requires, I've researched plenty of funds that I don't own. Usually the fund gets my interest, but for one reason or the other I decided not to own.

Here are some of my favorite funds that I currently don't own:

Global ex-U.S. Real Estate Index Admiral Shares - Sounds very exotic and a natural diversifier. While .32% ER is low for this type of fund, the .25% buy and .25% redemption fees make me hesitate. I know that if I bought it, the .32 ER would nag at me (my average ER =.095%). Also, this fund seems overly concentrated in Asia. Finally, by the time I broke it out from my REIT allocation, it would be a very small part of my AA (probably 1%). And of course, this fund does not sit well in Taxable (heavy distributions) nor in Tax-Advantaged (Lost Foreign Tax Credit). So goodbye to my Hong Kong Skyscrapers.

I'm with you here and concluded the same. My REIT's are a 7.5% slice so splitting them makes no sense, and placement doesn't work for me either. It's like that really nice looking pair of shoes at a great price, that just don't fit.

Total International Bond Index Admiral Shares - My bonds are very heavily concentrated in the US, and it makes logical sense to diversify bonds internationally just like stocks. And Vanguard wrote a very good research paper supporting it. But at .2% ER, I have to justify paying double my current ER. With a SEC Yield of 1.60%, I don't see any special compelling reason to jump in. Add to that hedging costs (I'd prefer not hedged for currency diversification). My aggregate bond fund already has some intl, as well as a tiny portion as part of some other funds.

Ditto... just can't find a reason to add another layer of bonds. STIG, ITIG, HY in IRA, LT Tax-Ex & IT Tax-Ex in taxable.

Emerging Markets Government Bond Index Admiral Shares - This again sounds like a natural diversifier, but with a .75% purchase fee and .35% ER, it seems like a lot to pay for a 4.87% yield. It's also a lot of risk for small upside gain. Finally, I'd prefer unhedged with no hedging cost.

If I was going to add EM bonds, perhaps in a play ROTH, this funds ETF (VWOB) is a contender as is FIDO's FNMIX, which I owned for about 6 years with great results.

Frontier Markets (various ETFs) - How exciting is that! It's like EM was 25 years ago. A great diversifier with huge gains potential. I've been watching these for quite some time, but so far cannot find a suitable vehicle to invest in. They seem to have high cost, low liquidity, and tend to be heavily invested in just a few countries or industries, or really be EM funds in disguise. Also, I generally avoid ETF's, and the most viable options in this space are ETFs.

Love the concept too ... finding low cost with interesting possibilities is the issue, as is space, amount, more complexity, slice size that would have an effect coming from where?....... ...

High-Yield Corporate Admiral Shares - This one I may actually do someday. My investment policy document allows me to do it (but I have to count it half toward my equity AA). The ER of .13 is within my comfort zone, and it is a Vanguard fund. But to get the Admiral Shares, I'd have to take to big of a chunk... so I need my portfolio to grow a bit more. Also, I'd have to bring an IRA in from another company, and that has some inertia. At 4.45% SEC Yield, I do not see urgency in this. I will evaluate when my portfolio hits a certain size. In the meantime, I'll settle for reading Rick and Larry debate it.

Have it, like it.... I look as carefully at longer/steady distribution yield as I do to SEC. Distribution is presently running in the 5.8'%s and has been in that range for the last 8 months or so. I consider it 22% equity risk as recommended by the debate boys. If you M* plot it from 2008, about early to midyear, when Total Bond and this diverged, and the SP500 sank, and plot that forward to today noting the recovery time to catch Total Bond, and whether or not the SP500 or Total US has caught this fund YET, you might change your mind. Of course what was, and what will or could be next may be totally different.

So for now my most exotic items is a very small EM tilt after Total Intl, some US REIT, some TIPs, and a small cap tilt on Total US. I used to own Small Cap International, but dropped that when I got Tot Intl. I always hear Taylor's voice reminding me to keep it simple and that prevents me from adding too many more when I get tempted.

What are your favorite funds you don't own?
The funds I find interesting now, but not interesting enough to own @ this point in time are IDV, an international high dividend ETF stock fund, VWOB which is Vanguard's Emerging Market Government Bond ETF.... other than that I am setting aside cash from my monthly flow for when (not if, when) that Black Swan called opportunity flies by.
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by G-Money »

One more:

DFA Investment Grade Portfolio (DFAPX). I think this is an interesting fund. Essentially, it's a bond fund which seeks to increase maturity and/or credit risk when the premiums for one, the other, or both are high. Several impediments for me to use it: IRA bond money is going to CDs, don't want to use an advisor just for access to DFA funds. Also, it's not immediately clear to me whether the changes are made mechanically (e.g., increasing credit risk x% for every y increase in the credit risk premium), or if changes are made by some manager's gut/feelings about the premia. Finally, I'd prefer if index funds were used, particularly for the corporate bond allocations, though I understand why DFA does not do so. So, while I have no intention of ever actually using this fund, I am interested to see how it performs.
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by Boglenaut »

midareff wrote:
Boglenaut wrote:
High-Yield Corporate Admiral Shares - This one I may actually do someday. My investment policy document allows me to do it (but I have to count it half toward my equity AA). The ER of .13 is within my comfort zone, and it is a Vanguard fund. But to get the Admiral Shares, I'd have to take to big of a chunk... so I need my portfolio to grow a bit more. Also, I'd have to bring an IRA in from another company, and that has some inertia. At 4.45% SEC Yield, I do not see urgency in this. I will evaluate when my portfolio hits a certain size. In the meantime, I'll settle for reading Rick and Larry debate it.

Have it, like it.... I look as carefully at longer/steady distribution yield as I do to SEC. Distribution is presently running in the 5.8'%s and has been in that range for the last 8 months or so. I consider it 22% equity risk as recommended by the debate boys. If you M* plot it from 2008, about early to midyear, when Total Bond and this diverged, and the SP500 sank, and plot that forward to today noting the recovery time to catch Total Bond, and whether or not the SP500 or Total US has caught this fund YET, you might change your mind. Of course what was, and what will or could be next may be totally different.
Do you have a link to the 22% value? I pulled "half" out of the air, and if there is a value that mathematically better reflects equity risk I'd like to use it.
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by ruralavalon »

All of our investments are at Vanguard. The funds I might use, if I couldn't use Vanguard or other index funds, are:

Dodge & Cox Stock (DODGX)
Dodge & Cox International Stock (DODFX)
PIMCO Total Return (PTTRX)
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by bottomfisher »

Considering new job. If I change then benefits through Thrift Savings Plan. Most likely go with TSP Lifecycle 2040 fund for simplicity purposes. Also 0.027% ER (thats 27 cents per $1,000 invested)!
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by WhyNotUs »

Wellesley, sold it as part of portfolio simplification and I miss it.
I own the next hot stock- VTSAX
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by CyberBob »

The DFA Global Balanced 60/40 fund (DGSIX) always intrigued me as an interesting one-fund solution. Unfortunately, I can't buy it :(

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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by investor »

Mutual Discovery Z shares MDISX

Sold it when Michale Price sold out to Franklin funds. Big mistake

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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by Beat The Street »

Lord abbett growth leaders.
“Never ask anyone for their opinion, forecast, or recommendation. Just ask them what they have—or don’t have—in their portfolio.” -Taleb
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by gwrvmd »

Sequoia SEQUX
Probably the best mutual fund of the last 50 years. 10 yr average annual rate of return 9.04%, since origination on 7/15/70 is 14.55%, ER 1.03% , up 29% this year
Presently closed to new investors. Was open for a couple of years 2008-2010, prior to that closed for about 20 years 1985 - 2005.
Have watched it for 30 years, when it opened in 2008 I was fully invested and didn't do anything but I still watch it
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by aquifer »

Wellington. I wonder if there are any companies that have been held by the fund since 1929. Would be interesting to know. I owned Wellington in my 401k before becoming a boglehead and moved everything to TR 2035 for simplicity.
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by jackholloway »

ruralavalon wrote:All of our investments are at Vanguard. The funds I might use, if I couldn't use Vanguard or other index funds, are:

Dodge & Cox Stock (DODGX)
Dodge & Cox International Stock (DODFX)
PIMCO Total Return (PTTRX)
If I might ask, why DODGX? My 401k has both that and institutional VG index and completion.
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by bottomfisher »

jackholloway wrote:
ruralavalon wrote:All of our investments are at Vanguard. The funds I might use, if I couldn't use Vanguard or other index funds, are:

Dodge & Cox Stock (DODGX)
Dodge & Cox International Stock (DODFX)
PIMCO Total Return (PTTRX)
If I might ask, why DODGX? My 401k has both that and institutional VG index and completion.
1) Low expense ratio for an actively managed fund 2) Low turnover, its been described as a "closet index fund" by some 3) Value characteristics (if you believe in value as potential source for increased returns)
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by FillorKill »

Renaissance Technologies Medallion fund.
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by midareff »

Boglenaut wrote:
midareff wrote:
Boglenaut wrote:
High-Yield Corporate Admiral Shares - This one I may actually do someday. My investment policy document allows me to do it (but I have to count it half toward my equity AA). The ER of .13 is within my comfort zone, and it is a Vanguard fund. But to get the Admiral Shares, I'd have to take to big of a chunk... so I need my portfolio to grow a bit more. Also, I'd have to bring an IRA in from another company, and that has some inertia. At 4.45% SEC Yield, I do not see urgency in this. I will evaluate when my portfolio hits a certain size. In the meantime, I'll settle for reading Rick and Larry debate it.

Have it, like it.... I look as carefully at longer/steady distribution yield as I do to SEC. Distribution is presently running in the 5.8'%s and has been in that range for the last 8 months or so. I consider it 22% equity risk as recommended by the debate boys. If you M* plot it from 2008, about early to midyear, when Total Bond and this diverged, and the SP500 sank, and plot that forward to today noting the recovery time to catch Total Bond, and whether or not the SP500 or Total US has caught this fund YET, you might change your mind. Of course what was, and what will or could be next may be totally different.
Do you have a link to the 22% value? I pulled "half" out of the air, and if there is a value that mathematically better reflects equity risk I'd like to use it.
I don't right at hand.. I believe it was Larry who called it 22% equity like risk for the VG HY (not others junk funds), 11% for IT IG and 5% for ST IG. Rick was, if I recall right, in the same ball park. From my perspective, if the fund dropped 22%, it would be paying 7.4 + % and I would be buying more for the dividend and the price recovery time.

I look at some distribution yields and just wonder.. short term treasuries are distributing near .40% ... an Ally MM is .85% and checking is .40% .. all with no interest rate risk. IT Treasuries is paying 1.50% now, up from much less earlier in the year, but ST IG with less interest rate risk is paying 2.0%, with IT IG is distributing 3.3% .

I hold ST IG, IT IG and HY in my TIRA and it won't be touched until either the end of the year I am 70 1/2, or 71. That's 5 or 6 years from now. While we have no idea what the future may hold it is probably a reasonable assumption that at some point in time the stimulus will diminish or go away, and to some extent interest rates will rise. How much is anyone's guess and I certainly have no crystal ball but a rudimentary review tells me; IT Treasury paying 1.5%, interest rates go up 2%, fund goes down 10% and now pays 3.5% .. 3 year recovery time. IT IG paying 3.3%, 2% interest rate rise and the fund also drops 10% but now pays 5.3% and recovers in less than 2 years. If the IT IG has 10-12% equity like risk and I have a holding period looking like 5+ years, and then the rest of my life, how concerned am I with that? Realistically, a 10% drop in 20% of the portfolio is 2%, not even half a balance band. Same for HY... 22% of 10% is 2.2% .. together they still aren't a balance band and my planned holding time makes the yield (and I am not chasing yield) more attractive.
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by ruralavalon »

jackholloway wrote:
ruralavalon wrote:All of our investments are at Vanguard. The funds I might use, if I couldn't use Vanguard or other index funds, are:

Dodge & Cox Stock (DODGX)
Dodge & Cox International Stock (DODFX)
PIMCO Total Return (PTTRX)
If I might ask, why DODGX? My 401k has both that and institutional VG index and completion.
Dodge & Cox Stock (DODGX), er = 0.52%, turnover just 11%, value tilt, and outperformance over its long history (growth of $10k since 1965, $1,613k vs $967k for S&P 500), DODFX link. Also the Dodge & Cox firm has the highest degree of investor satisfaction after Vanguard, WSJ report of survey results , which is the reason I first began to take notice of their funds.
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by DueDiligence »

Boglenaut wrote:
midareff wrote:
Boglenaut wrote:
High-Yield Corporate Admiral Shares - This one I may actually do someday. My investment policy document allows me to do it (but I have to count it half toward my equity AA). The ER of .13 is within my comfort zone, and it is a Vanguard fund. But to get the Admiral Shares, I'd have to take to big of a chunk... so I need my portfolio to grow a bit more. Also, I'd have to bring an IRA in from another company, and that has some inertia. At 4.45% SEC Yield, I do not see urgency in this. I will evaluate when my portfolio hits a certain size. In the meantime, I'll settle for reading Rick and Larry debate it.

Have it, like it.... I look as carefully at longer/steady distribution yield as I do to SEC. Distribution is presently running in the 5.8'%s and has been in that range for the last 8 months or so. I consider it 22% equity risk as recommended by the debate boys. If you M* plot it from 2008, about early to midyear, when Total Bond and this diverged, and the SP500 sank, and plot that forward to today noting the recovery time to catch Total Bond, and whether or not the SP500 or Total US has caught this fund YET, you might change your mind. Of course what was, and what will or could be next may be totally different.
Do you have a link to the 22% value? I pulled "half" out of the air, and if there is a value that mathematically better reflects equity risk I'd like to use it.
FWIW VWEHX High-Yield Corporate had effective market equity loading of ~23% before 2008, been higher since then

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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by pinebarrens1 »

BBL wrote
Renaissance Technologies Medallion fund.
+1...... 35% annual returns after fees since 1989? That's crazy ridiculous
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by RyeWhiskey »

A while ago I looked into actively managed funds and here's what I came up with as my preferred bunch:

Small cap: Berwyn Fund BERWX
Mid cap: Baron Focused Growth Retail BFGFX
Large cap: Fidelity Contrafund FCNTX
Large cap: Matthew 25 MXXVX
International Large cap: Dodge & Cox International DODFX
Emerging Markets Bond: Fidelity New Markets Income FNMIX
International Asia: Matthews Asia Dividend Investor MAPIX

Obviously all are too expensive and don't fit into my IPS but it was fun to look them over. :beer
This post was brought to you by Vanguard Total World Stock Index (VTWSX/VT).
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by Boglenaut »

DueDiligence, thanks for the chart.

As expected, the number is not a constant. If I did ever buy High Yield, I'd probably use .31 (from your table) with it in my mind it could go up rapidly. I'll add that to my spreadsheet.

But, I have no immediate plans to buy...it's still my "Favorite Fund that I don't own".
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by FNK »

Vanguard Small Cap Index. I like the "bands" idea for "graduating" stocks. Not available in my 401(k), and the available Extended Market (S&P500 completion) is close enough.

I bonds. Not even exhausting my tax-deferred options at the moment.

TIPS. Will start adding these once my stock allocation goes down enough.
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by Boglenaut »

FNK wrote: I bonds. Not even exhausting my tax-deferred options at the moment.
Agreed. I have tons of tax-advantaged space so never bought them. Plus, I didn't want to open a Treasury Direct account to hold them. But they are quite interesting and I have considered them.
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by robertalpert »

gwrvmd wrote:Sequoia SEQUX
Probably the best mutual fund of the last 50 years. 10 yr average annual rate of return 9.04%, since origination on 7/15/70 is 14.55%, ER 1.03% , up 29% this year
Presently closed to new investors. Was open for a couple of years 2008-2010, prior to that closed for about 20 years 1985 - 2005.
Have watched it for 30 years, when it opened in 2008 I was fully invested and didn't do anything but I still watch it
If I were younger..............Gordon

I purchased Sequoiafund in 2008 when it first re-opened and have liked being invested in it. But have hesitated to increase my allocation due to it's 1% ER.
Sequoia closed to new investors at outside brokerages earlier this year. It just closed to all new investors about one week ago.

http://www.sequoiafund.com/images/sequo ... 0%2013.pdf
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by frugalhen »

Tweedy Browne global Value fund- held it for 10 years. And could not justify the expense ratio any longer.

Dodge and Cox stock and international
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by jackholloway »

ruralavalon wrote:
jackholloway wrote:
ruralavalon wrote:All of our investments are at Vanguard. The funds I might use, if I couldn't use Vanguard or other index funds, are:

Dodge & Cox Stock (DODGX)
Dodge & Cox International Stock (DODFX)
PIMCO Total Return (PTTRX)
If I might ask, why DODGX? My 401k has both that and institutional VG index and completion.
Dodge & Cox Stock (DODGX), er = 0.52%, turnover just 11%, value tilt, and outperformance over its long history (growth of $10k since 1965, $1,613k vs $967k for S&P 500), DODFX link. Also the Dodge & Cox firm has the highest degree of investor satisfaction after Vanguard, WSJ report of survey results , which is the reason I first began to take notice of their funds.
Thanks.
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by Sconie »

In addition to DODFX, I would add Harbor International Institutional---HAINX.
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by nedsaid »

I regretted not owning Fidelity Contrafund. Will Danoff has done a great job there.

American Century Equity Income. It did very well through the two bear markets of the 2000's and now is the flagship fund of that fund family. Its performance has fallen off recently and the stodgy old Value fund that I have owned for years has actually done a bit better over the last 10 years.

American Funds EuroPacific Growth. An excellent International Stock Fund that I have watched for years. It is even available at my workplace savings plan. I own an International Index fund instead. I own one of the large Fidelity International funds also through my workplace.

Fidelity Magellan and American Century Ultra. These were very popular in 401k plans, particularly during the 1990's. I was a big Peter Lynch fan. Good thing I didn't own Magellan as it was never the same after getting hit with asset bloat and the departure of Lynch. Ultra also got hit with asset bloat and was never the same. I did own Ultra for probably a couple years.

The Davis funds. I have forgotten the exact names of the funds that Chris Davis manages. As I recall, one is no-load and the other is a load fund. I have been a big fan of Chris Davis for years. The collapse of financial stocks in the 2008-2009 downturn took some of the luster off of Davis' record. The family fortune was in part built on investments in the financial sector.

Edit: The Wellington and Wellesley funds at Vanguard are also on the list.

There are others I can't think of right now. But over all, I am pretty happy with what I own. I have found that the best investments are often the ones that you already own.
A fool and his money are good for business.
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by InvestorNewb »

I like Vanguard's Total World fund (VT) based on its simplicity. I don't own it but I think it's great for any investor.
My Portfolio: VTI [US], VXUS [Int'l], VNQ [REIT], VCN [Canada] (largest to smallest)
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by linenfort »

Well(ington+esly)
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Re: Your Favorite Funds that You Don't Own

Post by beammeupscotty »

ruralavalon wrote:Dodge & Cox Stock (DODGX), er = 0.52%, turnover just 11%, value tilt, and outperformance over its long history (growth of $10k since 1965, $1,613k vs $967k for S&P 500), DODFX link. Also the Dodge & Cox firm has the highest degree of investor satisfaction after Vanguard, WSJ report of survey results , which is the reason I first began to take notice of their funds.
Looks like the out-performance is entirely due to the period between 2000-2002. Before and after that, performance is nearly identical to S&P 500 (which isn't shabby, but hardly worth paying 10x ER and taking the manager risk).

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