Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

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Francis42
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by Francis42 »

Not even a little bit. Market dropped and I tripled my contribution amounts. Been a great opportunity to rebalance my after tax account to the international and small value weights I’ve been endeavoring to build.
bearcub
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by bearcub »

Jack Bogle once said something like peep once a year at your portfolio. Stay the course.
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Fat-Tailed Contagion
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by Fat-Tailed Contagion »

Depression is Stage 4 of 5 of the Grief Process.

Stage 5 is Acceptance.
“The intelligent investor is a realist who sells to optimists and buys from pessimists.” | ― Benjamin Graham, The Intelligent Investor
tibbitts
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by tibbitts »

bearcub wrote: Fri Apr 03, 2020 5:29 am Jack Bogle once said something like peep once a year at your portfolio. Stay the course.
I think that advice has already been dismissed as irresponsible in this thread. If looking is that difficult for someone they should probably authorize someone they trust to log in and view their balances.
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KEotSK66
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by KEotSK66 »

not depressed about my portfolio/vwiax, already from ~20% down to 10% down

more or less behaving as expected, and a major reason I selected it

☘️☘️☘️ to all, eoy 📈📈📈

buy low, don't sell low
"i just got fluctuated out of $1,500", jerry
jnet2000
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by jnet2000 »

Stop looking at your portfolio... stop coming to Bogleheads for a while and focus on your work, hobbies, etc.

We are coping by believing in the American Economy this is part of investing.

100% stocks through the Great Recession. 50/50 with a large emergency fund now. I'm buying now to keep our asset allocation in check and staying the course. I'm sleeping well at night in terms of our portfolio because our asset allocation is perfect for our life situation.
"You really don't need leverage in this world much. If you're smart, you're going to make a lot of money without borrowing" Warren Buffet
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steve roy
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by steve roy »

I'm too busy sanitizing, washing my hands, social distancing and exercising to pay any attention or have much of an emotional reaction. If I'm dead, it won't matter what my investment totals are, and if I'm alive I'll peek at them sometime after they bottom.
JohnDindex
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by JohnDindex »

IF you are accumulating I'm not sure why you would be depressed, unless your portfolio is part of your emergency fund and your job is in jeopardy. In that case might want to hold more fixed income, fixed income has done exactly what it should do.

IF you retired in 2008 with $1m 50/50 stock/bond using 4% rule you have 1.261m right now, it seems like it's going to be OK...High water mark was 1.38m.

You have to take the RISK to receive the RETURN.

I look at my account everyday, mostly to make sure it is correct and there is no strange issues or fraud. I find it better stay in touch with it, if you are at the point where you cannot stomach looking then I think you are taking TOO much risk IMO.

Unrelated note, brokered CD's are looking really good compared to 1-5 year treasuries, obviously much worse than 3 mo ago, but still a big premium for the small investor.

To each their own.
Ambitious994
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by Ambitious994 »

kareysue wrote: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:04 pm My portfolio everyday when logging into vanguard is just red and red. Seems depressing just looking at it. How are you guys coping (for people who lost money) in the market now?
Well, I'm not because of my asset allocation. Overall, when taking into account my entire portfolio, I'm not down by 30% or so like the S&P 500 as a whole is this year. This is why asset allocation is very important because while someone at my young age "should" (quote, unquote) be 70% to 90% in stocks over bonds related investments, the problem comes when the market crash hits you and you freak out.

I made a post here about potentially selling my equities even with my current allocation, only because I thought timing the market this time was going to be spot on! I was just sure that DOW 15000 was going to come. But strange enough, I think we have bottomed out around DOW 18000-19000 level.

It just shows you can't time the markets in the short term, all you can do is develop a great asset allocation that you can stick with for 25 years :D ! I know that I cannot stomach a 70% plus equities holding, not my risk tolerance. I'm what is deemed "Moderately Conservative" which in my Balanced Portfolio still gives me a very good estimated CAGR over the upcoming years!
JD2775
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by JD2775 »

I keep track of my investments every month on a Google Sheets document. Nothing fancy, just name of account and total balance, and +/- total from the previous month. Usually done on the 1st of the month. Been doing this the last 5 years.

I skipped April, and will probably skip May/June.

I just don't want to look right now.
anoop
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by anoop »

I've been depressed for more than 10 years now since, being almost entirely in fixed income (money market in 401k, t-bills in roth and after tax), my balance has hardly moved. The depression was beginning to lift around 2018 but now it's back with a vengeance. I check my portfolio regularly to make sure the deposits are happening correctly. I just called and opted out of auto roll for all of my t-bill holdings. Have no idea what to do next.
lexor
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by lexor »

kareysue wrote: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:04 pm My portfolio everyday when logging into vanguard is just red and red. Seems depressing just looking at it. How are you guys coping (for people who lost money) in the market now?
Honestly not really (and I thought I would). I think if it lost another 30% I'd be fairly depressed
“The miracle of compounding returns is overwhelmed by the tyranny of compounding costs.” -Mr. John C. Bogle
dboeger1
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by dboeger1 »

3 things I like to keep in mind which help me stay calm:

First, unless your entire portfolio was lump-summed in at the bull market's peak, you probably haven't "lost" nearly as much as you think relative to your contribution amounts. If I put $10 in the market, it doubles to $20, and then the market has a 50% drop, I still have exactly what I put in. DCA over time does a wonderful job of smoothing out returns. There's a FIRE blogger "RB40" who periodically posts detailed net worth updates, and one of the interesting things you can see from them is that as you zoom out to see his investment performance over the course of his career, his net worth was mostly steadily up. Sure, there were drops here and there, but buying on the way down and then back up quickly recovers from such crashes. I say quickly because in the grand scheme of things, you should have reasonable a time horizon for any money in the stock market, but it can feel like an eternity when we're so used to having liquid assets ready to sell for a profit at a moment's notice in a bear market.

Second, I really do believe you don't lose anything until you sell. Some people will try to argue the opposite point, that this is just an excuse to ignore that the portfolio is worth less today than it was yesterday. But I think that's part of the point. It's just what somebody paid for it today. If I buy a can of soda and it goes on clearance sale tomorrow, I don't say I lost anything. Maybe that I wish I had waited for a better deal, but that's about it. It's still the same number of calories, the same grams of sugar, the same carbonation, just purchased at a different price. Nobody knows the future. The market value at any given time is the market's collective best estimate at what a stock is worth. But the market doesn't know if tomorrow will bring a pandemic or an economic boom. It's just guessing based on the information available. When new information comes out, the price will change again, but the shares themselves are no different than what they were before the new information came out. They were always going to return some unknown amount in the long run. So yes, I very much think it's fair to say you don't lose unless you sell. You wouldn't sell your big new TV to the first person who came along offering $5 for it. So why sell your stock? The fact that you're sad about the price means you think it's worth more than what's being offered. For a sufficiently long time horizon, you're probably right. The ability to see an exact dollar value of our portfolios in real-time has tricked millions of investors into treating their shares like a savings account, and that's just not how it works.

Third, speaking of savings accounts, if stocks always went up, they wouldn't be any riskier than savings accounts, and then people would pile into them to the point that their returns wouldn't be any better than savings accounts anyway. Japan's lost decade is a perfect example of that, only worse because unlike a savings account which is relatively safe and liquid, inflated stock prices create winners and losers, and the losers end up holding their overpriced shares for extended periods of time or being forced to sell for pennies on the dollar to cover short-term costs. In summary, if stocks keep going up and up uninterrupted, you should run for the hills (that's certainly partly to blame for the extent of this particular crash after the longest bear market in history, although there are of course many factors). These crashes are built into those long-term stock returns beginning investors drool over. You can't have one without the other. Stock investors don't want a 0.1% long-term return, otherwise they'd stick to FDIC-insured savings accounts and maybe bonds, so they need to accept these crashes as a natural part of getting those juicy 10% returns. And if they can't handle 100% equities, then there's a whole spectrum of different asset allocations which might work for their particular risk tolerance. Just being 50/50 stocks and bonds has been a significantly steadier asset allocation with solid returns in the past. And certainly for people about to retire, this is why asset allocation is so important in combatting sequence of returns risk.
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guwop
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by guwop »

OP: You haven't lost money, but here's what you did lose:

1. Value (of portfolio)
2. Time (spent checking your portfolio every day, when you could've used the time for something else)
3. Hair follicles (related to #2 above)

Find something/s to occupy your time in a productive manner.

Hope this helps!
stocknoob4111
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by stocknoob4111 »

kareysue wrote: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:04 pm My portfolio everyday when logging into vanguard is just red and red. Seems depressing just looking at it. How are you guys coping (for people who lost money) in the market now?
It doesn't affect me because I already mentally digested the fact that the portfolio could fall up to 50% in a worst case scenario. We are still quite above that at the moment. I would start feeling uneasy if the S&P 500 goes below the 50% mark though (1700 or so) but my thoughts are it will not get that bad. I do think that we will flirt with the 50% mark (around 1700-1800 or so) however this may take a few months to materialize.
lexor
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by lexor »

kareysue wrote: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:04 pm My portfolio everyday when logging into vanguard is just red and red. Seems depressing just looking at it. How are you guys coping (for people who lost money) in the market now?
Regarding coping - I'm continuing to invest what I can and also increased my leverage slightly (I had almost none prior to this crash).
“The miracle of compounding returns is overwhelmed by the tyranny of compounding costs.” -Mr. John C. Bogle
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ruralavalon
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by ruralavalon »

Googliebear wrote: Thu Apr 02, 2020 9:38 pm
Firemenot wrote: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:13 pm No and I’m 100 percent in stock and I’m down BIG money. Doesn’t phase me though as I lived through the Great Recession and I’ve spent years educating myself on stock market history. I’m also a scientist-type personality which probably helps too.
+1 to the T, except more the engineering type.
Clearly not an English major, the word is "faze".
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bo105954027
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by bo105954027 »

I highly urge Vanguard to add "customize color theme" function in settings.
Time in market beats timing the market.
RoboFan
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?(

Post by RoboFan »

I look at my portfolio frequently, very frequently when things are going bad, every day at the moment. I don’t change much based on what see, might spend a bit less if it’s really bad (now), but mostly I just max out my 401 and adjusting my asset allegation every 5 or 10 years (I’m getting older).

Why do I look at my portfolio so often? Why more often when things are going bad? Well, I think the minor downward adjustment in spending I do now when things are going bad is a habit I want to have firmly in place when I retire. Also, when I retire I want to be able to go to my account and not find any surprises. If I need to sell when it’s down 30%, I want to be able to say to myself it’s no big deal “I’ve seen this a hundred times before, the market will go back up”. If it’s up 30%, I want to be able to say to myself, don’t go crazy spending it “I’ve seen this a 100 times before, the market can go down too”.

As an analogy I might add that same principle apples to watching my weight. If I stopped weighing myself every day and went with the “close your eyes and check once a year” I’m guessing I would put on about 30lbs every year.

My advice, find what works for you. If looking every day is painful, with no positive upside don’t do it. If it causes to change your behavior in a positive way, go ahead and look every day. And always, no matter what, just keep going.
virginiabirdie
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by virginiabirdie »

Nope. If it makes you feel better, my family bought a very expensive commercial property and the tenant has stopped paying. (It was supposed to provide income for retirement. I thought it was a terrible idea, but no one listens to the baby of the family.) Commercial landlords with big mortgage balances and tax bills are in a lot of trouble.

My portfolio is what it is. My allocation was built for times like this, and I'm sure it'll bounce back. If not, I can still live with it b/c I have a good amount in cash and high-quality bonds. (Thanks Vanguard robo-risk questionairre that pegged me "very conservative." I've missed out on a lot of upside, but am ok during big downturns.)
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JonnyDVM
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by JonnyDVM »

HomeStretch wrote: Thu Apr 02, 2020 1:30 am No. My concern for my portfolio is dwarfed by my concerns about the pandemic and the economy.
Agree. It’s not my portfolio that’s making me depressed.
I’d trade it all for a little more | -C Montgomery Burns
Candor
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by Candor »

I plan to retire in a couple of years and while I was 52/24/24 at the start of this I have still lost a significant amount of money to me. I have taken it all in stride but earlier today I hesitantly plugged my "new" numbers into FIRECalc for the first time since the drop and was pleasantly surprised. I realize my previous numbers took into account past drops but it was nice to see things haven't changed that much if I were to retire now. That may change depending on what happens going forward but there's not too much I can do about that. If you have used retirement calculators before you may be surprised how little your long term outlook may have changed due to this downturn.
bltn
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Re: Anyone here depressed just looking at their portfolio?

Post by bltn »

arcticpineapplecorp. wrote: Thu Apr 02, 2020 8:52 am
The patient says, "Doctor, it hurts when I do this."
The doctor says, "Then don't do that!"

-- Henny Youngman
Very appropriate.

I m afraid I m finding myself now in that lunatic fringe of bogleheads who looks at his portfolio every day. While doing this recently and reading through the forums, I did some tlh for the second time in my investing career. Simply to transfer some money from long held actively managed stock funds into index stock funds. Finally got around some of those capital gains taxes.

During the dips in 1987,2000,and 2008, I was working so many hours , I didn t pay much attention to my accounts, I just kept saving.

Now I m glad that my bonds/cash portion is conservative enough to give us several years of income before I would have to consider selling stocks to meet expenses.j
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