Advice on Portfolio

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Topic Author
livelifealittle
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2016 4:01 pm

Advice on Portfolio

Post by livelifealittle »

Emergency funds: Yes
Debt: car $21k @1.49%
Tax Filing Status: Married Filing Jointly
Tax Rate: 25% Federal, 8-9.3% State
State of Residence: CA
Age: 34
Desired Asset allocation: 40% US stocks / 30% bonds?
Desired International allocation: 30% stocks?


Current retirement assets

Taxable 76%
$120k cash (for investing – do not include emergency funds)
$70k cash (house down payment)

Tax Advantaged total 24%
His Traditional IRA at Vanguard
$11.7k Vanguard Target Retirement 2045 Fund (VTIVX) (0.16%)
Company match? No

Her Traditional IRA at Fidelity
$5.5k not invested to anything yet
$6k HENNESSY GAS UTILITY INVESTOR CL (GASFX) (1.02%)

Her Rollover IRA at Fidelity
$15.6k FIDELITY SELECT BIOTECHNOLOGY (FBIOX) (0.73%)

His and Her HSA at Saturna
$9k Amana Mutual Funds Trust Growth Fund Investor (AMAGX) (1.09%)
$13k Amana Mutual Funds Trust Income Fund Investor (AMANX) (1.15%)


Contributions

2016 Contributions (not yet made)
$6,750 HSA
$11,000 his and her traditional IRA
$14,300 his SIMPLE IRA (include employer matching contributions)
$27,000 her solo 401k (include ~$9k employer portion)
$whatever left can go to taxable (for retirement, not short term goals)



I've been reading a lot of posts here and I have Bogleheads Guide to Investing that I just can't seem to digest. I definitely can use some guidance from bogleheads experts.
DH and I are planning to buy our first house next year so we're putting aside some cash for down payment ($300k max in neighboring state). We're pretty frugal and are savers but not familiar with investing. We don't need much and we both want to get financial independence (hopefully) at 45 so we're trying to aggressively maximize our savings now. We also plan to work part time after FI so we won't have to tap our savings if not necessary.


Questions:
- What would you suggest for asset allocation and what fund to invest? We're not attached to any of the fund we have so letting them go is an okay option.
- Should we do the 3 fund portfolio for mine (Fidelity FSTMX, FTIGX, FBIDX) and his (Vanguard VTSMX, VGTSX, VBMFX)?


Thank you,
livelifealittle



Also, can someone kindly let me know where in Fidelity/Vanguard site to look this up? I can update it once I know where to find it
Available funds

Funds available in his 401(k)
Fund name (ticker symbol) (expense ratio)

Funds available in her 403(b)
Fund name (ticker symbol) (expense ratio)
Last edited by livelifealittle on Thu Oct 06, 2016 8:49 pm, edited 2 times in total.
krow36
Posts: 2372
Joined: Fri Jan 30, 2015 6:05 pm
Location: WA

Re: Advice on Portfolio

Post by krow36 »

A SIMPLE IRA with Vanguard and an i401k with Fidelity have no restrictions on the funds available, so you can skip that part of the format. I don't think you have a 403b so that's also irrelevant.
Topic Author
livelifealittle
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2016 4:01 pm

Re: Advice on Portfolio

Post by livelifealittle »

Oh right! Thanks, I didn't see 403b there. Editing it shortly.
Topic Author
livelifealittle
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2016 4:01 pm

Re: Advice on Portfolio

Post by livelifealittle »

Bump. Anyone?
LeeMKE
Posts: 2045
Joined: Mon Oct 14, 2013 9:40 pm

Re: Advice on Portfolio

Post by LeeMKE »

It looks like you are backing into this and hopefully are getting the hang of our approach.

If the book is too much, have you read the Wiki? The basic idea is simple, but everyone struggles a bit when they are trying to get the hang of it.

You've edited an asset allocation of 70/30 (40 US stocks, 30 intl stocks/30 bonds) which is about right for your age IMHO.

Evaluate your plan as a whole, not in separate pieces. This is a big help when some accounts are too small to comfortably include the 3 funds (minimum $45,000). So, you may end up with one account that holds all bonds and another that holds all stock until each account is large enough to split it up into several funds. Otherwise, you end up paying a higher commission on all the funds, and that's not ideal.

And yes, move to the index funds for everything, where available as a choice.

A rule of thumb is that you need to save 15% of your gross income from your 20's to 65 to have enough to cover the same level of spending in retirement. You are starting late, and so saving more is a good idea. But I'm wondering if you have any other retirement accounts available to you? It is easier to grow your portfolio when it is in a tax deferred account. If not, you have another reason to be aggressive about saving for retirement.
The mightiest Oak is just a nut who stayed the course.
Lou354
Posts: 689
Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2016 10:51 pm

Re: Advice on Portfolio

Post by Lou354 »

A three fund portfolio would be fine. You don't have to have all three funds in each account. Instead you could implement the three fund portfolio concept across all accounts (IRAs, HSAs and taxable) viewed as a single portfolio. Look up the wiki on tax-efficient fund placement.

Does the HSA offer any lower-cost funds?
Topic Author
livelifealittle
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2016 4:01 pm

Re: Advice on Portfolio

Post by livelifealittle »

LeeMKE wrote:It looks like you are backing into this and hopefully are getting the hang of our approach.

If the book is too much, have you read the Wiki? The basic idea is simple, but everyone struggles a bit when they are trying to get the hang of it.

You've edited an asset allocation of 70/30 (40 US stocks, 30 intl stocks/30 bonds) which is about right for your age IMHO.

Evaluate your plan as a whole, not in separate pieces. This is a big help when some accounts are too small to comfortably include the 3 funds (minimum $45,000). So, you may end up with one account that holds all bonds and another that holds all stock until each account is large enough to split it up into several funds. Otherwise, you end up paying a higher commission on all the funds, and that's not ideal.

And yes, move to the index funds for everything, where available as a choice.

A rule of thumb is that you need to save 15% of your gross income from your 20's to 65 to have enough to cover the same level of spending in retirement. You are starting late, and so saving more is a good idea. But I'm wondering if you have any other retirement accounts available to you? It is easier to grow your portfolio when it is in a tax deferred account. If not, you have another reason to be aggressive about saving for retirement.
I read the wiki, but I will re-read it again. It's hard to understand because of the wordings are still foreign to me. When you say move to index funds, do you recommend we sell what we currently have?

Yes, we have late start. My early jobs didn't earn much and it was just enough to survive. I'm a sole proprietor so I only have access to solo 401k or SIMPLE plan. Are there any specific accounts you have in mind? We plan to drop our income after FI so the tax rate should drop pretty low and that's my reason to max tax deferred accounts now vs Roth. Is this not a good plan?
Topic Author
livelifealittle
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2016 4:01 pm

Re: Advice on Portfolio

Post by livelifealittle »

Lou354 wrote:A three fund portfolio would be fine. You don't have to have all three funds in each account. Instead you could implement the three fund portfolio concept across all accounts (IRAs, HSAs and taxable) viewed as a single portfolio. Look up the wiki on tax-efficient fund placement.

Does the HSA offer any lower-cost funds?
I searched and it seems that Saturna HSA has access to all Vanguard funds. The fee is $14.95 per trade but there is inactivity fee of $25/yr. Is this a better option?
Here's the thread where I got the information from: viewtopic.php?t=135513
Lou354
Posts: 689
Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2016 10:51 pm

Re: Advice on Portfolio

Post by Lou354 »

livelifealittle wrote:
Lou354 wrote:A three fund portfolio would be fine. You don't have to have all three funds in each account. Instead you could implement the three fund portfolio concept across all accounts (IRAs, HSAs and taxable) viewed as a single portfolio. Look up the wiki on tax-efficient fund placement.

Does the HSA offer any lower-cost funds?
I searched and it seems that Saturna HSA has access to all Vanguard funds. The fee is $14.95 per trade but there is inactivity fee of $25/yr. Is this a better option?
Here's the thread where I got the information from: viewtopic.php?t=135513
Yes. It will cost you $60 to do four trades in year 1, which is 0.27% ($60/$22,000 = 0.0027) of the value of both HSA accounts. In other years you'll incur $50 in inactivity fees, which is 0.23% ($50/$22,000 = 0.0023) of the value of both HSA accounts. Add in the expense ratio of the Vanguard funds you buy, and it's still less than the expense ratio you're paying now.
User avatar
ruralavalon
Posts: 20565
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 10:29 am
Location: Illinois

Re: Advice on Portfolio

Post by ruralavalon »

Welcome to the forum :) .

It's good to see that you are nearly debt free, with no high interest debt. Bogleheads' Guide to Investing is a good choice for where to start your reading. It's good to see that you are interested in using low expense ratio mutual funds..

Asset allocation.
The first decision to make is to settle on an asset allocation, the stock/bond mix and domestic/international mix that you want to aim for.
livelifealittle wrote:Age: 34
Desired Asset allocation: 40% US stocks / 30% bonds?
Desired International allocation: 30% stocks?

In my opinion at age 34 an asset allocation of 70/30 stocks/bonds is within the range of what is reasonable.

In my opinion 43% (30/70 = 43%) of stocks in international is too high. I suggest around 20 - 30% of stocks in international stocks. Vanguard paper (March 2012), "Considerations for investing in non-U.S. equities". Historically, allocating 20% of an equity portfolio to non-U.S. stocks would have captured about 84% of the maximum possible diversification benefit, and allocating 30% of an equity portfolio to non-U.S. stocks would have captured about 99% of the maximum possible diversification benefit (p. 6).

That would work out to about: 30 bonds; 15-20% international stocks; and 50-55% domestic stocks.


Accounts & priority.
livelifealittle wrote:Contributions

2016 Contributions (not yet made)
$6,750 HSA
$11,000 his and her traditional IRA
$14,300 his SIMPLE IRA (include employer matching contributions)
$27,000 her solo 401k (include ~$9k employer portion)
$whatever left can go to taxable (for retirement, not short term goals)
Total = $59k/yr

You are right to make it a priority to contribute to the taxable account only after fully funding the tax-protected accounts. Please see the wiki article "Prioritizing investments".

For ease of management I suggest that the accounts be consolidated at one location. In the example I give that is Fidelity. At Vanguard they do not offer Admiral Shares of their mutual funds in their solo (individual) 401k.

You could consider combing her traditional IRA and her rollover IRA, both now at Fidelity.


Fund selection.
In selecting funds strive for a combination of broad diversification (to reduce risk) and low expense ratios (to increase your net gain). To simply and easily achieve those two goals I suggest choosing funds to simulate the very well diversified, low expense ratio "three-fund portfolio". Wiki article "Three-fund portfolio". Forum discussion, "The Three-Fund Portfolio".

At Fidelity the three funds to use would be:
Fidelity® Total Market Index Fund - Premium Class (FSTVX) ER 0.045%
Fidelity® Global ex U.S. Index Fund - Premium Class (FSGDX) ER 0.11%
Fidelity® U.S. Bond Index Fund - Premium Class (FSITX) ER 0.05%

At Vanguard the three funds to use would be:
Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund Admiral Shares (VTSAX) ER 0.05%
Vanguard Total International Stock Index Fund Admiral Shares (VTIAX) ER 0.12%
Vanguard Total Bond Market Index Fund Admiral Shares (VBTLX) ER 0.06%

In the taxable account use only very tax-efficient funds, large cap stock index funds such as Fidelity® Total Market Index Fund - Premium Class (FSTVX) ER 0.045% and Fidelity® Global ex U.S. Index Fund - Premium Class (FSGDX) ER 0.11%. Both are very tax-efficient. Wiki article "Tax-efficient fund placement". Those funds are also well suited to any type of account. Both are very diversified with very low expense ratios.

The bond fund, Fidelity® U.S. Bond Index Fund - Premium Class (FSITX) ER 0.05%, should be placed in tax protected accounts.

I am not really familiar with the funds offered in the HSA at Saturna, but made some suggestions below. I ordinarily prefer an intermediate-term bond fund, but did not see a good intermediate-term fund offered. As stated I am not really familiar with their funds so may have missed something.

In addition to their $15 fee ($25 broker assisted) for buying outside funds, they indicate "VANGUARD FUNDS*
. . . . .
*Surcharges may apply." But I couldn't find what the surcharges are for using a Vanguard fund.


Example portfolio.
Here is an example portfolio that you could consider. This is a three-fund type portfolio. Current portfolio size = $179.8k. New annual contributions = about $59k. The asset allocation is: 30% bonds; 20% international stocks; and 50% domestic stocks. The percentages given are percentages of the total portfolio, not of a given account. The suggestion is to switch both the existing balances and the new contributions to the funds indicated. All percentages are rounded off so may not add up exactly. Sometimes I state 00% to indicate funds you might want to add in the future.

Taxable account @ Fidelity (67% of current total; $120k; add $????/yr)
47%, Fidelity® Total Market Index Fund - Premium Class (FSTVX) ER 0.045%
20%, Fidelity® Global ex U.S. Index Fund - Premium Class (FSGDX) ER 0.11%

His traditional IRA @ Fidelity (07% of current total; $11.7k; adds $5.5k/yr = 09% of new annual contributions)
07%, Fidelity® U.S. Bond Index Fund - Premium Class (FSITX) ER 0.05%

His SIMPLE IRA @ Fidelity (00% of current total; $0000; adds $14.4k/yr = 24% of new annual contributions)
00%, Fidelity® Total Market Index Fund - Premium Class (FSTVX) ER 0.045%
00%, Fidelity® Global ex U.S. Index Fund - Premium Class (FSGDX) ER 0.11%
00%, Fidelity® U.S. Bond Index Fund - Premium Class (FSITX) ER 0.05%

Her traditional IRA @ Fidelity (06% of current total; $11.5k; adds $5.5k/yr = 09% of new annual contributions)
06%, Fidelity® U.S. Bond Index Fund - Premium Class (FSITX) ER 0.05%

Her rollover IRA @ Fidelity (09% of current total; $15.6k)
09%, Fidelity® U.S. Bond Index Fund - Premium Class (FSITX) ER 0.05%

Her solo 401k @ Fidelity (00% of current total; $0000; adds $27k/yr = 46% of new annual contributions)
00%, Fidelity® Total Market Index Fund - Premium Class (FSTVX) ER 0.045%
00%, Fidelity® Global ex U.S. Index Fund - Premium Class (FSGDX) ER 0.11%
00%, Fidelity® U.S. Bond Index Fund - Premium Class (FSITX) ER 0.05%

His & her HSA @ Saturna (12% of current total; $21k; adds $6.7k/yr = 11% of new annual contributions)
03%, Amana Mutual Funds Trust Growth Fund Investor (large-cap growth stocks, primarily domestic stocks) (AMAGX) (1.09%)
09%, Sextant Short-term Bond Fund (avg. eff. duration = 1.53 yrs; avg. credit quality = BBB) (STBFX) ER 0.75%


Rebalancing.
Because the funds will grow at different and unpredictable rates, it may be necessary every year or two to rebalance in order to maintain the desired asset allocation. Wiki article, "Rebalancing". You can easily adjust the asset allocation by exchanging between funds inside his SIMPLE IRA or inside her solo 401k.

. . . . .

For additional reading I suggest another book on general investing. Wiki article, "Books: recommendations and reviews".

If you have any questions just ask.

I hope that this helps.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started
HeadSpinning
Posts: 121
Joined: Sun Mar 29, 2015 8:27 pm

Re: Advice on Portfolio

Post by HeadSpinning »

+1 to ruralavalon suggested portfolio, with a slight modification. I would use FTIPX instead of FSGDX for the international portion. It is a more complete fund.
Topic Author
livelifealittle
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2016 4:01 pm

Re: Advice on Portfolio

Post by livelifealittle »

ruralavalon wrote:Welcome to the forum :) .

It's good to see that you are nearly debt free, with no high interest debt. Bogleheads' Guide to Investing is a good choice for where to start your reading. It's good to see that you are interested in using low expense ratio mutual funds..

Asset allocation.
The first decision to make is to settle on an asset allocation, the stock/bond mix and domestic/international mix that you want to aim for.
In my opinion at age 34 an asset allocation of 70/30 stocks/bonds is within the range of what is reasonable.

In my opinion 43% (30/70 = 43%) of stocks in international is too high. I suggest around 20 - 30% of stocks in international stocks. Vanguard paper (March 2012), "Considerations for investing in non-U.S. equities". Historically, allocating 20% of an equity portfolio to non-U.S. stocks would have captured about 84% of the maximum possible diversification benefit, and allocating 30% of an equity portfolio to non-U.S. stocks would have captured about 99% of the maximum possible diversification benefit (p. 6).

That would work out to about: 30 bonds; 15-20% international stocks; and 50-55% domestic stocks.


Accounts & priority.
Total = $59k/yr

You are right to make it a priority to contribute to the taxable account only after fully funding the tax-protected accounts. Please see the wiki article "Prioritizing investments".

For ease of management I suggest that the accounts be consolidated at one location. In the example I give that is Fidelity. At Vanguard they do not offer Admiral Shares of their mutual funds in their solo (individual) 401k.

You could consider combing her traditional IRA and her rollover IRA, both now at Fidelity.


Fund selection.
In selecting funds strive for a combination of broad diversification (to reduce risk) and low expense ratios (to increase your net gain). To simply and easily achieve those two goals I suggest choosing funds to simulate the very well diversified, low expense ratio "three-fund portfolio". Wiki article "Three-fund portfolio". Forum discussion, "The Three-Fund Portfolio".

At Fidelity the three funds to use would be:
Fidelity® Total Market Index Fund - Premium Class (FSTVX) ER 0.045%
Fidelity® Global ex U.S. Index Fund - Premium Class (FSGDX) ER 0.11%
Fidelity® U.S. Bond Index Fund - Premium Class (FSITX) ER 0.05%

At Vanguard the three funds to use would be:
Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund Admiral Shares (VTSAX) ER 0.05%
Vanguard Total International Stock Index Fund Admiral Shares (VTIAX) ER 0.12%
Vanguard Total Bond Market Index Fund Admiral Shares (VBTLX) ER 0.06%

In the taxable account use only very tax-efficient funds, large cap stock index funds such as Fidelity® Total Market Index Fund - Premium Class (FSTVX) ER 0.045% and Fidelity® Global ex U.S. Index Fund - Premium Class (FSGDX) ER 0.11%. Both are very tax-efficient. Wiki article "Tax-efficient fund placement". Those funds are also well suited to any type of account. Both are very diversified with very low expense ratios.

The bond fund, Fidelity® U.S. Bond Index Fund - Premium Class (FSITX) ER 0.05%, should be placed in tax protected accounts.

I am not really familiar with the funds offered in the HSA at Saturna, but made some suggestions below. I ordinarily prefer an intermediate-term bond fund, but did not see a good intermediate-term fund offered. As stated I am not really familiar with their funds so may have missed something.

In addition to their $15 fee ($25 broker assisted) for buying outside funds, they indicate "VANGUARD FUNDS*
. . . . .
*Surcharges may apply." But I couldn't find what the surcharges are for using a Vanguard fund.


Example portfolio.
Here is an example portfolio that you could consider. This is a three-fund type portfolio. Current portfolio size = $179.8k. New annual contributions = about $59k. The asset allocation is: 30% bonds; 20% international stocks; and 50% domestic stocks. The percentages given are percentages of the total portfolio, not of a given account. The suggestion is to switch both the existing balances and the new contributions to the funds indicated. All percentages are rounded off so may not add up exactly. Sometimes I state 00% to indicate funds you might want to add in the future.

Taxable account @ Fidelity (67% of current total; $120k; add $????/yr)
47%, Fidelity® Total Market Index Fund - Premium Class (FSTVX) ER 0.045%
20%, Fidelity® Global ex U.S. Index Fund - Premium Class (FSGDX) ER 0.11%

His traditional IRA @ Fidelity (07% of current total; $11.7k; adds $5.5k/yr = 09% of new annual contributions)
07%, Fidelity® U.S. Bond Index Fund - Premium Class (FSITX) ER 0.05%

His SIMPLE IRA @ Fidelity (00% of current total; $0000; adds $14.4k/yr = 24% of new annual contributions)
00%, Fidelity® Total Market Index Fund - Premium Class (FSTVX) ER 0.045%
00%, Fidelity® Global ex U.S. Index Fund - Premium Class (FSGDX) ER 0.11%
00%, Fidelity® U.S. Bond Index Fund - Premium Class (FSITX) ER 0.05%

Her traditional IRA @ Fidelity (06% of current total; $11.5k; adds $5.5k/yr = 09% of new annual contributions)
06%, Fidelity® U.S. Bond Index Fund - Premium Class (FSITX) ER 0.05%

Her rollover IRA @ Fidelity (09% of current total; $15.6k)
09%, Fidelity® U.S. Bond Index Fund - Premium Class (FSITX) ER 0.05%

Her solo 401k @ Fidelity (00% of current total; $0000; adds $27k/yr = 46% of new annual contributions)
00%, Fidelity® Total Market Index Fund - Premium Class (FSTVX) ER 0.045%
00%, Fidelity® Global ex U.S. Index Fund - Premium Class (FSGDX) ER 0.11%
00%, Fidelity® U.S. Bond Index Fund - Premium Class (FSITX) ER 0.05%

His & her HSA @ Saturna (12% of current total; $21k; adds $6.7k/yr = 11% of new annual contributions)
03%, Amana Mutual Funds Trust Growth Fund Investor (large-cap growth stocks, primarily domestic stocks) (AMAGX) (1.09%)
09%, Sextant Short-term Bond Fund (avg. eff. duration = 1.53 yrs; avg. credit quality = BBB) (STBFX) ER 0.75%


Rebalancing.
Because the funds will grow at different and unpredictable rates, it may be necessary every year or two to rebalance in order to maintain the desired asset allocation. Wiki article, "Rebalancing". You can easily adjust the asset allocation by exchanging between funds inside his SIMPLE IRA or inside her solo 401k.

. . . . .

For additional reading I suggest another book on general investing. Wiki article, "Books: recommendations and reviews".

If you have any questions just ask.

I hope that this helps.
Thanks ruralavalon! Really appreciate the detail review, suggestions, and the links you provided. It really helps a lot.
50/20/30 sounds good to me. Is it wise to convert everything all at once or should we do it in phases?

What does combing mean? (I googled it up and couldn't find what it means?)
Should we move DH funds to Fidelity or he's fine at Vanguard?

I looked up Admiral and Premium funds you recommend and it looks like their min balance is higher, so in a sense, it's like buying in bulk and get more savings on the expense ratio, correct? And since we have enough money to get into Admiral/Premium funds, logically, those are the funds we should get vs Investor class?

Thank you again for the detailed review and suggestion. I can't tell you enough how much I appreciate your feedback :sharebeer
Topic Author
livelifealittle
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2016 4:01 pm

Re: Advice on Portfolio

Post by livelifealittle »

HeadSpinning wrote:+1 to ruralavalon suggested portfolio, with a slight modification. I would use FTIPX instead of FSGDX for the international portion. It is a more complete fund.
Got it. All 3 funds will match the Fidelity 3 funds suggested on https://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Three-fund_portfolio
Thank you!
User avatar
ruralavalon
Posts: 20565
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 10:29 am
Location: Illinois

Re: Advice on Portfolio

Post by ruralavalon »

livelifealittle wrote:Thanks ruralavalon! Really appreciate the detail review, suggestions, and the links you provided. It really helps a lot.
50/20/30 sounds good to me. Is it wise to convert everything all at once or should we do it in phases?
I suggest switching all at once.
livelifealittle wrote:What does combing mean? (I googled it up and couldn't find what it means?)
Should we move DH funds to Fidelity or he's fine at Vanguard?
It a typo, I meant combining.

I personally think having all accounts at one location is simpler, so think moving everything to Fidelity is the way to go.
livelifealittle wrote:I looked up Admiral and Premium funds you recommend and it looks like their min balance is higher, so in a sense, it's like buying in bulk and get more savings on the expense ratio, correct? And since we have enough money to get into Admiral/Premium funds, logically, those are the funds we should get vs Investor class?
Yes it's just buying in bulk, the content of the funds are identical. You should buy the Admiral and Premium funds.

By the way I agree with HeadSpinning that Fidelity Total International Index Fund Premium (FTIPX) is more diversified than Fidelity Global ex U.S. Index Fund (FSGDX) Premium which I had mentioned.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started
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