Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

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TheTimeLord
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Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by TheTimeLord » Mon Sep 14, 2015 12:02 am

As I prepare for retirement in the coming year or so I have begun mapping my income for the next decade+ to specific assets, be it pensions, CDs, I-Bonds or even some amount of equities. I guess in essence I am trying to guaranty the first decade's income and pinpoint it's exact source. Did anyone else take this approach to their retirement planning as oppose to focusing on a SWR? I would appreciate knowing how it worked out and if you have any advice.
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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by celia » Mon Sep 14, 2015 12:21 am

Although our pensions covered our basic living expenses, we did this for the purpose of finding out how much of our TIRAs we could convert each year without going into the next tax bracket (ie keeping a level taxable income). As the exact amount of dividends and capital gains became known each year, we adjusted the RMDs up or down a bit. It "worked" if that's what you're looking for but our situation was a bit different from yours.

I made a bar chart on graph paper with each graph paper square representing $1,000 and each income stream was a tall box of multiple squares. An income of $5,000 from one source was a box as tall as 5 graph squares. We made a column of income-boxes stacked up for each year and our ages were shown for each year. We calculated spousal SS starting mid-year and age 70 SS for partial and full years. We're about 5 years into the chart (started the chart off during last year of work). I've marked the column for each year showing the standand deduction (it increases the year each person reaches 65) and where each tax bracket falls along the column for the year.

For just covering expenses, you might consider charting the expenses too if you know they will vary--such as travel or downsizing. Dont forget that once you retire you probably aren't saving for retirement any more. At some time the mortgage, if there is one, will be paid off. And when your income drops, so do your taxes!
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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by bertilak » Mon Sep 14, 2015 7:14 pm

TheTimeLord wrote:As I prepare for retirement in the coming year or so I have begun mapping my income for the next decade+ to specific assets, be it pensions, CDs, I-Bonds or even some amount of equities. I guess in essence I am trying to guaranty the first decade's income and pinpoint it's exact source. Did anyone else take this approach to their retirement planning as oppose to focusing on a SWR? I would appreciate knowing how it worked out and if you have any advice.
TimeLord,

I match assets to income needs, but don't do it by time. Instead I do it by importance. I want to cover the essentials (food, clothing, shelter, health care, transportation) with income that is as reliable as possible. This I cover with pension and SS. (I am quite lucky that this works for me. If it didn't I would seriously consider an SPIA, or more likely an SPIA ladder.) Other things can come from my risky investments: a stock/bond portfolio. Inflation and entertainment of all types pretty much make up this category.

I don't want a guarantee for just the first decade, but for life.

One complication I addressed recently is what happens at my passing: the guaranteed income stream (pension+SS) gets cut by 40%. Here I did consider an annuity but instead decided to pay off my mortgage using a very big chunk of my portfolio. The savings in expense almost exactly makes up for the lost income. There is a tax cost but I calculate that it will be recovered in a year of not paying mortgage interest.
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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by Kevin M » Mon Sep 14, 2015 7:38 pm

This is similar to the Liability Matching Portfolio approach, except that the LMP approach doesn't limit it to a decade+, but is intended to cover one's residual living expenses throughout retirement. Are you familiar with the LMP approach?

A classic LMP would consist of a TIPS ladder, with each maturing TIPS being enough to fund your residual living expenses each year. In this case you would have an "exact source" for each year's residual living expenses (in excess of pension, social security, etc.). Using annuities is an alternative approach.

I don't do exactly LMP, but my intention is to hold at least enough in safe assets to cover my residual living expenses in retirement. I don't worry about the exact source. If stocks are over target allocation, sales of stocks could fund part of residual living expenses for a particular year (this has been the case in recent years for me), and proceeds from fixed income could just roll over into other fixed income instead of funding residual living expenses.

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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by TheTimeLord » Tue Sep 15, 2015 8:18 am

To clarify on why I am doing this. I will retire over a decade before I plan to take SS. I value these years very highly I want to make sure I am able to do the things I want. I also realize that to some extent the success of one's retirement is luck of the draw depending on how the market performs in the early years of retirement and if you are required to withdraw significant assets during a bear market. I have also committed to helping to support my MIL if she outlives her money which would fall with this period. As for the question why I am preparing for this decade+ instead of life, between pensions and SS our expenses our expenses should be covered and our investment portfolio will only be needed to generate income for fun activities. Since both my DW and I will have approximately equal SS and we have the option of taking our small pensions with a 100% survivor benefit and COLA I feel if one of us significantly outlives the other they will be in good shape whatever may come. So for me the real remaining difficulty in retirement planning is how to I insure my decade+ of highly valuable pre-SS retirement years is sufficiently funded no matter what Mr. Market decides to do.

Apparently I am incorrect but I would have thought this would be a fairly common situation for those retiring in their 50s to have to deal with.
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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by midareff » Tue Sep 15, 2015 8:47 am

Kevin M wrote:This is similar to the Liability Matching Portfolio approach, except that the LMP approach doesn't limit it to a decade+, but is intended to cover one's residual living expenses throughout retirement. Are you familiar with the LMP approach?

A classic LMP would consist of a TIPS ladder, with each maturing TIPS being enough to fund your residual living expenses each year. In this case you would have an "exact source" for each year's residual living expenses (in excess of pension, social security, etc.). Using annuities is an alternative approach.

I don't do exactly LMP, but my intention is to hold at least enough in safe assets to cover my residual living expenses in retirement. I don't worry about the exact source. If stocks are over target allocation, sales of stocks could fund part of residual living expenses for a particular year (this has been the case in recent years for me), and proceeds from fixed income could just roll over into other fixed income instead of funding residual living expenses.

Kevin

Very similar to our situation although I started SS @ 64, not wanting to sacrifice liquidity in taxable. Three and a half years retired now and the market's run has enabled me to place 18 to 20 years of draw in "safe" money, similar to Dr. Bernstein's LMP, except I use ST and IT Bond Funds since I have a cola'd pension that with SS pays all regular living expenses.

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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by pkcrafter » Tue Sep 15, 2015 10:15 am

TheTimeLord wrote:To clarify on why I am doing this. I will retire over a decade before I plan to take SS. I value these years very highly I want to make sure I am able to do the things I want. I also realize that to some extent the success of one's retirement is luck of the draw depending on how the market performs in the early years of retirement and if you are required to withdraw significant assets during a bear market. I have also committed to helping to support my MIL if she outlives her money which would fall with this period. As for the question why I am preparing for this decade+ instead of life, between pensions and SS our expenses our expenses should be covered and our investment portfolio will only be needed to generate income for fun activities. Since both my DW and I will have approximately equal SS and we have the option of taking our small pensions with a 100% survivor benefit and COLA I feel if one of us significantly outlives the other they will be in good shape whatever may come. So for me the real remaining difficulty in retirement planning is how to I insure my decade+ of highly valuable pre-SS retirement years is sufficiently funded no matter what Mr. Market decides to do.

Apparently I am incorrect but I would have thought this would be a fairly common situation for those retiring in their 50s to have to deal with.
I think it is a fairly common question, but you've worded it a little differently because of your goals. I certainly understand the feelings a person faces when retiring, but you cannot pinpoint anything, especially with the unknown variable you have with your M-I-L. Once you start SS, you won't have much need for withdrawing for necessities, and as for now, I'm not even sure the withdrawal rate is important but it may help if you provide that number. Will you be withdrawing from taxable or tax deferred? Knowing the withdrawal rate will determine the strategy. For instance, if it's 4-5%, then you should probably hold the AA you have now, If the WR is higher than 6%, you should reduce the equity allocation.

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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by TheTimeLord » Tue Sep 15, 2015 12:33 pm

pkcrafter wrote:
TheTimeLord wrote:To clarify on why I am doing this. I will retire over a decade before I plan to take SS. I value these years very highly I want to make sure I am able to do the things I want. I also realize that to some extent the success of one's retirement is luck of the draw depending on how the market performs in the early years of retirement and if you are required to withdraw significant assets during a bear market. I have also committed to helping to support my MIL if she outlives her money which would fall with this period. As for the question why I am preparing for this decade+ instead of life, between pensions and SS our expenses our expenses should be covered and our investment portfolio will only be needed to generate income for fun activities. Since both my DW and I will have approximately equal SS and we have the option of taking our small pensions with a 100% survivor benefit and COLA I feel if one of us significantly outlives the other they will be in good shape whatever may come. So for me the real remaining difficulty in retirement planning is how to I insure my decade+ of highly valuable pre-SS retirement years is sufficiently funded no matter what Mr. Market decides to do.

Apparently I am incorrect but I would have thought this would be a fairly common situation for those retiring in their 50s to have to deal with.
I think it is a fairly common question, but you've worded it a little differently because of your goals. I certainly understand the feelings a person faces when retiring, but you cannot pinpoint anything, especially with the unknown variable you have with your M-I-L. Once you start SS, you won't have much need for withdrawing for necessities, and as for now, I'm not even sure the withdrawal rate is important but it may help if you provide that number. Will you be withdrawing from taxable or tax deferred? Knowing the withdrawal rate will determine the strategy. For instance, if it's 4-5%, then you should probably hold the AA you have now, If the WR is higher than 6%, you should reduce the equity allocation.

Paul
The WR I calculated needing is 4.6% until SS, but I am taking what I think is sort of a Bernstein approach and instead of counting on say withdrawals of 4.6% in general, I am matching specific CDs or Emergency Fund savings account or I-Bonds and assuming a start date for my pension to target a specific year's expenses. What is left over is in a portfolio for which I will assign an AA appropriate for a 15 yearish timeframe. Now if somewhere along the road we get a couple big stock market years great, but I want at least 80% of the funds I plan on needing from now to SS to be in very, safe, secure, non-volatile investments. i hope that provides a clearer picture.
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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by itstoomuch » Tue Sep 15, 2015 12:45 pm

Yes. Using deferred GLWB VA and FI annuities, 2008-2012. I know Exactly what the minimum income would be from these annuities for the guaranteed periods and beyond. We pay for the "option". Our Indexes and trading accounts are big unknowns but they have done well since 2008. We purchased a "pension plan" in these annuities which have also done very well since 2008. I expect 2015 and possible beyond that Market will not be as kind as the previous 7 years. We are seriously considering taking Income from some of these annuities because the marginal guaranteed future income increases are small in comparison to the total income. We took SS when first eligible primarily for immediate income, use it or lose it philosphy, and believed the Market will outpace the SS deferrals.
YMMV. GL
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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by itstoomuch » Tue Sep 15, 2015 1:02 pm

At 65/68, We have positioned the trading accounts primarily into utilities (targeting 4% divs); A set of dVA have 5% GLW.; Another set will have 6.5% GLW at age 70 (2 more years). I plan to extinquish the Index Accounts fairly rapidly because they are the unknowns regardless of AA. We desire a bequest motive. Have LTCi. No debts. SWR target is 4.5%. Spurts of higher withdrawals from trading accounts. YMMV.
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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by Watty » Tue Sep 15, 2015 1:23 pm

TheTimeLord wrote: I would have thought this would be a fairly common situation for those retiring in their 50s to have to deal with.
There is another thread about this going on where the poster is trying to figure out a strategy he or she was trying to think through.

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=173812&newpost=2623852

Where I posted this.
I just retired and somewhat like you I will have at least a six year gap until I start both medicare and Social Security when my finances will be much different.

I am looking at my money as being two separate portfolios,

1) Money that I will spend in the next few years before I am getting Medicare and Social security which is invested more conservatively. Similar asset allocation to the Vanguard Retirement Income fund

2)The rest of my money which I will not need for at least six years. This has a bit higher stock allocation which will decrease as I get closer to needing it. Similar asset allocation to the Vanguard 2020 target retirement fund.

This of course is still one combined portfolio that in a market downturn the impact on portfolio 1 would be a lot less than the other so the overall impact would be less.
With my wife and I starting social security and medicare at different times there will be a lot years with different income needs, and early in retirement we will be doing things like more traveling too. This make a safe withdrawal rate pretty meaningless.

What I did was to make a spreadsheet to model our finances year by year with a different row for each year and a column for each entry like each of our social security, health insurance, etc and then a projected spending and ending balance. It is a lot simpler than it sounds. I then played with a the investment growth assumptions and spending to see what would work. I will likely start Social security at 70 to get the largest benefit but for this spreadsheet I assumed I started it at 65 as the worst case because that is when I start medicare.

This was pretty straightforward to do but it is using steady market returns. To see what impact the market swings might have I then entered my result into firecalc to see how that came out. It takes a while to figure out how to enter some of the additional information on the extra screens in firecalc but after playing with it for a while I was able to get a simplified version entered and that looked OK.

All that was mostly just to cross check my plan to make sure that it was not unrealistic. There is so much that is unknowable that even more sophisticated planning it would not give you a lot better picture of how things will play out.

The margin of safety is that even though we are not wealthy we could cut back our expenses a lot and still be more than comfortable if we had to. With a paid off house in a relatively low cost of living area the things like food and utilities are pretty easy to cover if you are only looking at the real necessities.

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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by TheTimeLord » Tue Sep 15, 2015 1:54 pm

Watty wrote:What I did was to make a spreadsheet to model our finances year by year with a different row for each year and a column for each entry like each of our social security, health insurance, etc and then a projected spending and ending balance.
Actually I am working from a similar spreadsheet. Year by year showing spending assumptions, accounting for possible MIL expenses, reflecting when our pensions start and then matching various assets to the year they would be liquidated and utilized. Can something go astray, of course, but this really gives me a sense of security and the likely outcome is my portfolio will end up adding to the funds available during this period. Although I am not counting on any contributions from any sources beyond those defined in the plan for each specific year.
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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by itstoomuch » Wed Sep 16, 2015 11:59 am

When I started to examine this in 2008, I came to the conclusion that future retirees and current retirees, who can do LMP, are those solely on SS and /or defined benefits ie Pension.

On the other extreme are those who have just a portfolio of self managed assets.

By the fall of 2008, I came to the conclusion that I had to rethink our MF and SS allocation to a more flexible yet more secure plan. We already had derisked to LTCi in our early 50's which essentially protected what ever assets remained the extreme end of our lives. I had to derisk from our 59/62 age to the age where we might expect LTC.
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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by heyyou » Wed Sep 16, 2015 2:27 pm

Separate the two problems mentally, but we all know that money is fungible.

Consider having a fully budgeted amount for you two in fixed income assets for the decade (ladders of maturing CDs early, and TIPS for the second half), expecting to spend them. But knowing that you can alternatively spend from rebalancing equity gains from the taxable account, when and if, the gains are there. Shall we call that "bucket with a ladle" for the dipping from the other asset class?

Your bucket for MIL holds 6-8 years of her spending. Reassess in five years when more is known, since you will get some warning about the end of her assets.

My retirement was such a relief from work, that the spending was secondary to us just joyously living without jobs. We were happy whether we were at home or away. I wish the same joyous retirement to you two.

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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by pkcrafter » Thu Sep 17, 2015 9:34 am

TimeLord wrote:
The WR I calculated needing is 4.6% until SS, but I am taking what I think is sort of a Bernstein approach and instead of counting on say withdrawals of 4.6% in general, I am matching specific CDs or Emergency Fund savings account or I-Bonds and assuming a start date for my pension to target a specific year's expenses. What is left over is in a portfolio for which I will assign an AA appropriate for a 15 yearish timeframe. Now if somewhere along the road we get a couple big stock market years great, but I want at least 80% of the funds I plan on needing from now to SS to be in very, safe, secure, non-volatile investments. i hope that provides a clearer picture.
You may be just framing your approach in a different way. For instance, I'm retired and I could say I'm separating income for the next 10 years from the rest of my portfolio, but really, there is only one portfolio. If I separate and draw down non-stock, the stock may increase in the rest of the portfolio and I might end up with higher drawdown risk in 10 years. The point is, if you mentally separate, you should still maintain your target AA in the whole portfolio, and if you do that, then have you really separated anything?

Your withdrawal rate is a bit higher than what might be considered "safe" but your position in 10 years resets the the safety factor. You didn't mention your AA, but it's probably most optimal at around 50% equity. Need - yes some. Ability - fair, especially considering reset in 10 years.

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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by TheTimeLord » Thu Sep 17, 2015 11:11 am

pkcrafter wrote:TimeLord wrote:
The WR I calculated needing is 4.6% until SS, but I am taking what I think is sort of a Bernstein approach and instead of counting on say withdrawals of 4.6% in general, I am matching specific CDs or Emergency Fund savings account or I-Bonds and assuming a start date for my pension to target a specific year's expenses. What is left over is in a portfolio for which I will assign an AA appropriate for a 15 yearish timeframe. Now if somewhere along the road we get a couple big stock market years great, but I want at least 80% of the funds I plan on needing from now to SS to be in very, safe, secure, non-volatile investments. i hope that provides a clearer picture.
You may be just framing your approach in a different way. For instance, I'm retired and I could say I'm separating income for the next 10 years from the rest of my portfolio, but really, there is only one portfolio. If I separate and draw down non-stock, the stock may increase in the rest of the portfolio and I might end up with higher drawdown risk in 10 years. The point is, if you mentally separate, you should still maintain your target AA in the whole portfolio, and if you do that, then have you really separated anything?

Your withdrawal rate is a bit higher than what might be considered "safe" but your position in 10 years resets the the safety factor. You didn't mention your AA, but it's probably most optimal at around 50% equity. Need - yes some. Ability - fair, especially considering reset in 10 years.

Paul
Here we differ. In two ways. First I would say by separating the portfolio and coming to appropriate AA for each separate portfolio you actually end up with a more appropriate AA for your overall portfolio if you view it as a whole. Second, my income needs from my portfolio will dramatically change once I start drawing SS. They will be minimal except for over and above fun and lifestyle. Essentially my risk drops dramatically at that point so I can be pretty much anywhere between 20/80 and 80/20. But for the decade+ before my risk is quite real and dramatic given the relatively short time frame so I need to make sure I have an approach that will meet my needs during that period without virtually no risk. Returning to work with my current earning power will definitely not be an option. Two totally different financial landscapes in my retired life.
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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by Kevin M » Thu Sep 17, 2015 3:25 pm

One difference between using an LMP/RP framework and a traditional risky/safe AA target is that you will not rebalance into stocks beyond the point at which your LMP is threatened. I keep both frameworks in mind, with the intention of rebalancing back to my (conservative) stock allocation based on my policies, but not beyond the point where I believe I would be dropping safe assets below the LMP level.

It's a good point that the portfolio withdrawal rate can be reduced once SS benefits kick in. The LMP can be constructed with this in mind, as TheTimeLord basically seems to be doing.

As I've said elsewhere, I think you get to basically the same position either by using the ability, willingness and need to take risk framework or by using the LMP/RP framework. Your ability and need to take risk are impacted by reliable income sources, like pension and SS, as is the size and structure of your LMP.

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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by pkcrafter » Thu Sep 17, 2015 7:41 pm

All in all, we are saying the same thing, and Kevin has summarized nicely. In the end it's just a difference in the way we frame the issues. You say you can have an 80/20 portfolio in 10 years, and I'm saying you should not, and will not have an 80/20 portfolio now, but in 10 years you can, although I would not recommend it. You are going to take 10 years worth of withdrawals in non-equity and spend it down. I'm saying, take annual portfolio withdrawals and rebalance when necessary to maintain your overall AA.

In the end, you'll do fine because you will have a lot of ability, but you don't have it right now.

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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by Dandy » Fri Sep 18, 2015 7:54 am

My plan when I was retired at age 60 was to delay pensions and SS until they reached their maximum. That was 5 years for a small second pension and 10 years for SS. I made sure I had enough "safe" money to get me to that goal - assuming no major surprises.
That resulted in a CD ladder, Ltd Term Tax Exempt Fund and a Savings account.

Each year I load up the Savings account with at least enough drawdown money for a year. I then automatically have my monthly needs sent to my checking account along with my main pension, SS, etc. I didn't have the full amount dedicated on day one of retirement but gradually I would top it off with taxable distributions, tax refunds etc. I also reduced my drawdown when my wife collected SS at 62, when I took a spousal SS on her SS, and when a second small pension hit at age 65. At age 67 I have more than enough 'Safe" money to reach age 70 and collect full SS as well as my RMD.

So, obviously I think your approach has merit. I see retirement, when your earning power reaches almost zero, is a time for a total review of your finances. The goal shifts from accumulation of assets to assuring the assets cover your full retirement. If you have enough assets, or really a decent amount more than enough, I like Wm Bernstein's approach of having enough "safe" assets to last 20 to 25 years (I modified that to age 90) and the rest invest any way you like. You build your portfolio from "the bottom up" i.e. what is needed to fund your retirement safely, and then decide how to allocate the rest. In my case it resulted in almost no change in my overall equity/fixed income allocation. What changed was the fixed income was allocated more toward CDs, short term bond funds and Savings accounts. While market volatility is still unsettling, I sleep well.

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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by TheTimeLord » Fri Sep 18, 2015 8:40 am

Dandy wrote:In my case it resulted in almost no change in my overall equity/fixed income allocation. What changed was the fixed income was allocated more toward CDs, short term bond funds and Savings accounts.
One thing that I can take advantage if I want using this 10+ time frame is longer duration CDs. Since I am actually mapping from early years to later exhausting already taxed savings accounts I can buy CDs of longer duration that actually pay interest. Normally it would be very difficult for me to pull the trigger on a CD with a duration longer than 5 years but with a plan in front of me that takes care of the expenses until X date is it much easier.
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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by Kevin M » Fri Sep 18, 2015 11:13 am

TheTimeLord wrote: One thing that I can take advantage if I want using this 10+ time frame is longer duration CDs. Since I am actually mapping from early years to later exhausting already taxed savings accounts I can buy CDs of longer duration that actually pay interest. Normally it would be very difficult for me to pull the trigger on a CD with a duration longer than 5 years but with a plan in front of me that takes care of the expenses until X date is it much easier.
My concern with longer-duration CDs, especially if you are talking about brokered CDs or any CDs without decent early withdrawal terms, would be high unexpected inflation. Even with decent early withdrawal terms, I'd be cautious about depending solely on longer-term CDs as part of a liability matching portfolio, since most terms and conditions allow denial of early withdrawals or changing the terms of existing CDs.

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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by TheTimeLord » Fri Sep 18, 2015 1:21 pm

Kevin M wrote:
TheTimeLord wrote: One thing that I can take advantage if I want using this 10+ time frame is longer duration CDs. Since I am actually mapping from early years to later exhausting already taxed savings accounts I can buy CDs of longer duration that actually pay interest. Normally it would be very difficult for me to pull the trigger on a CD with a duration longer than 5 years but with a plan in front of me that takes care of the expenses until X date is it much easier.
My concern with longer-duration CDs, especially if you are talking about brokered CDs or any CDs without decent early withdrawal terms, would be high unexpected inflation. Even with decent early withdrawal terms, I'd be cautious about depending solely on longer-term CDs as part of a liability matching portfolio, since most terms and conditions allow denial of early withdrawals or changing the terms of existing CDs.

Kevin
There is some risk there but unless it was to occur very soon the accumulated extra interest earned over short term instruments should mitigate that to an extent it is very manageable.
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Kevin M
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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by Kevin M » Fri Sep 18, 2015 2:32 pm

TheTimeLord wrote: There is some risk there but unless it was to occur very soon the accumulated extra interest earned over short term instruments should mitigate that to an extent it is very manageable.
This is always the case with longer-term, higher-yield fixed income. If inflation is high enough, it wipes out the advantage of the higher yields. Conversely, shorter-term fixed income can be rolled over at the higher rates. For this reason, shorter-term fixed income is considered a better hedge against inflation (or so say the likes of Fama and French): Q&A: Protecting Purchasing Power
EFF/KRF wrote:TIPS and short-term bonds are good inflation hedges.
Kevin
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Re: Mapping specific assets to retirement income requirements

Post by OffGridder » Fri Sep 18, 2015 8:02 pm

I am struggling with similar situation. Rebalance of my taxable vs IRA after receipt of a large lump sum payment. Going into early retirement at age 58. My primary concern is if I load my taxable up with equities and it takes a deep dive causing early depletion of my taxable account, the need to tap my rollover IRA before the optimum time to do so. See post below for details.

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=170073&p=2624038#p2624038
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