Mike Piper

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Mike Piper, aka Oblivious Investor

Mike Piper: Mike is the author of several personal finance books as well as the popular blog ObliviousInvestor.com. He is a Colorado licensed CPA. Mike’s writing has been featured in many places, including The Wall Street Journal, Money Magazine, Forbes, MarketWatch, and Morningstar. Mike lives with his wife in Manitou Springs, Colorado, where they enjoy hiking and rock climbing.


Books

  • Accounting Made Simple: Explained in 100 Pages or Less ISBN 978-0981454221
  • Taxes Made Simple: Income Taxes Explained in 100 Pages or Less ISBN 978-0981454214
  • Independent Contractor, Sole Proprietor, and LLC Taxes Explained in 100 Pages or Less ISBN 978-0981454269
  • LLC vs. S-Corp vs. C-Corp Explained in 100 Pages or Less ISBN 978-0981454276
  • Investing Made Simple: Index Fund Investing and ETF Investing Exlained in 100 Pages or Less ISBN 978-0981454245
  • Can I Retire? How Much Money You Need to Retire and How to Manage Your Retirement Savings: Explained in 100 Pages or Less ISBN 978-0981454252
  • Social Security Made Simple: Social Security Retirement Benefits and Related Planning Topics Explained in 100 Pages or Less ISBN 978-0981454283
  • Microeconomics Made Simple: Basic Microeconomic Principles, Explained in 100 Pages or Less (coauthored with Austin Frakt, PhD) ISBN 978-0981454290
  • Oblivious Investing: Building Wealth by Ignoring the Noise ISBN 978-0981454238 [Now out of print.]

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Blog

Mike Piper - Oblivious Investor

A reader writes in, asking: “I currently use three Schwab ETFs for my portfolio: Schwab U.S. Broad Market, Schwab International Equity, and Schwab Short-Term U.S. Treasury. But I’ve been reading about their Fundamental Index Funds and ETFs as well. The idea of allocating to companies according to sales and cash flow makes a lot of sense to […]
This week, I enjoyed three articles about buying insurance. Karen Haywood Queen shares a strategy for saving money on life insurance. Jim Dahle warns against a common (but poorly-reasoned) sales pitch for life insurance. And Michael Kitces offers a guiding overall philosophy on when and when not to buy insurance. Saving with a Life Insurance Ladder from Karen […]
Last week’s article about tax-gain harvesting with bonds drew quite a bit of correspondence from readers. (To recap, the general idea is to sell a bond that has increased in value since you bought it — and which you have held for more than one year – and reinvest the proceeds in a similar, newly-issued bond with a […]
The retirement planning concept of “safe withdrawal rates” (and the accompanying “4% rule” concept) can be traced back to an article by financial planner Bill Bengen — an article that was published 20 years ago this month (October, 1994). This week, the Journal of Financial Planning published a piece by financial planner Jonathan Guyton (with additional perspectives […]
Tax-loss harvesting is a very common tax strategy in which you sell a holding when its value is less than the amount you paid for it, then reinvest the proceeds from the sale in a similar (though not “substantially identical”) investment. The idea is that you then get to use the capital loss (up to $3,000 per year) […]

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