Bill Schultheis

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Bill Schultheis

Bill is a bogleheads.org reading list author


In 1998 Bill Schultheis created the Coffeehouse Investor in an effort to bring a simpler and smarter investment philosophy to individuals and corporations across the nation and around the world. He has appeared regularly on Seattle’s PBS Serious Money program, is a guest contributor on NPR’s Morning Edition and wrote a syndicated investment column for eight years.

For 13 years he worked with retail and institutional accounts for Smith Barney in Seattle, WA. For the past eight years he has been a principal and fee-only financial adviser, currently with Soundmark Wealth Management in Kirkland, WA.

Schultheis grew up on a wheat farm in eastern Washington, attended Washington State University, and graduated from Texas A&M University in 1982.

When he’s not working, he can be found on the golf course, camping on Mt. Rainier, cooking in the kitchen, writing his next book, and enjoying the company of his wonderful family and friends.

Bill's book, The Coffeehouse Investor

Blog

Bill Schultheis - The Coffeehouse Investor

Believe it or not, it is already December — and before you know it, we will be looking back on 2014.

You still have a few weeks, however, to do some end-of-the-year maintenance that can help you both now and in the long run.
It's our turn to share our shameless plug on the most perfect gift (in our opinion) to give this year. The Coffeehouse Investor book provides a wealth of advice on investing with common sense, financial planning long term, and how to get on with your life while ignoring Wall Street. Bill’s quick wit and simple strategies are perfect for the beginning investor or the "expert" who continues to try and beat the market.
In the latest issue of 425 Business, Bill reminds readers of the lessons learned attempting to beat the market. He references the work of Nobel Prize recipient Eugene Fama, “his study on the efficiency of markets should be a reminder to all of us that when you purchase stock in a publicly traded company, you aren’t really betting on the future success of the company. Instead, you are betting on your own power to predict the emotions of other investors and their expectations of a company’s success.”

The holidays are upon us, and for some lucky people, that means a little extra money is headed their way, too.

Whether it’s a year-end bonus at work, a cash gift from a family member or even the annual cash-back award from your credit card, how you handle a windfall can have a big impact on your financial future.
It’s the time of year to discuss pies – your “money pie” that is. If you are unsure of what I'm referring to, you missed chapter five of The Coffeehouse Investor. Bill writes extensively about the biggest piece of the investment pie, compounding.

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