Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

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Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby trapped959 » Fri Jul 12, 2013 12:16 pm

I work as a senior analyst in corporate finance and am starting to feel trapped in my current career path. I don't really find the work interesting or challenging anymore, but I'm having trouble transitioning to something else. I was a math major at an Ivy with poor grades and a 3.1 overall GPA. I didn't know enough about finance in undergrad to work towards getting a summer internship at an investment bank or some other analyst-type position, so now I feel locked out of that career track entirely. I was planning on going to graduate school to do research in math, but the classes were just too hard, so I had to settle for my current job. I'm 28 and only make around $50k, and I feel like all my peers are surpassing me. I've thought about getting an MBA, but I think it's pretty useless if you can't get into Harvard, Stanford, or Wharton, which I doubt I will with my grades and work experience. The same goes for shelling out $100k to take accounting courses to get the CPA. Maybe I could study and take the CFA? I'd like to do business development, but I can't seem to get interviews from any of the companies I apply to. It seems they all want ex-MBB consultants or investment bankers. Any thoughts on what I should do? Thanks for your help.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby Andyrunner » Fri Jul 12, 2013 12:39 pm

Sounds like you need to figure out what you want to do. CFA/CPA are completely different things. Applying for jobs is one thing, working contacts will get you much farther.

Getting your MBA at a lower-tier school isn't worthless, if anything it helps you establish contacts. I got into my current company because some of the other students and professors work full time at my company and was able to get my name in the door. Also most of these MBA programs are for people without business undergrads so you don't so much learn hard skills but learn how to work with people from different skill sets as you work on projects together (example: HR people think differently then engineers).

Have you spoke to your manager on moving around within the company? Former coworkers? Old college buddies?
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby mathwhiz » Fri Jul 12, 2013 12:44 pm

Are there opportunities within your current company to get experience on other projects? Have you looked at the big 4 accounting firms. You may not be a CPA but they all have consulting operations where your business experience might be valuable.

Also, you might have to push yourself out of your comfort zone to get ahead. Are you willing to relocate geographically to a less desirable area to gain experience? Take less desirable jobs with heavy travel but a lot of experience to boost your resume? etc. etc. etc.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby trapped959 » Fri Jul 12, 2013 1:35 pm

Andyrunner wrote:Sounds like you need to figure out what you want to do. CFA/CPA are completely different things. Applying for jobs is one thing, working contacts will get you much farther.


I'm just trying to hit the reset button on a terrible undergrad experience. If I can do that by gaining new job experience then that's what I'd prefer. I'd rather not deplete my entire life savings for another degree that may or may not help me find a new job.

mathwhiz wrote:Are you willing to relocate geographically to a less desirable area to gain experience? Take less desirable jobs with heavy travel but a lot of experience to boost your resume? etc. etc. etc.


I'm pretty much stuck in the Boston area due to family.

Andyrunner wrote:Have you spoke to your manager on moving around within the company?


How would that conversation go?
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby ensign_lee » Fri Jul 12, 2013 1:39 pm

Re: convo with manager

Just be upfront with him. Pull him aside and basically summarize what you said in your OP. That you want to try something different and that you were hoping he could help you move somewhere else within the company instead of outside the company altogether.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby Grt2bOutdoors » Fri Jul 12, 2013 2:27 pm

You're not too clear on exactly what function you fill at your employer? Are you truly working in corporate finance evaluating capital projects and/or acquisitions? or is your function more of a reporting type role? It sounds like the latter, only because your salary is quite low, but that may also be indicative of the industry you are in.

Before you make any moves including speaking with current employer, you should evaluate if you want to remain working in the industry currently in. You could transfer your skill set into other industries if they are similar. Corporate finance is corporate finance for most companies, you are evaluating NPV and IRR's. You can leverage your Ivy degree, have you spoken with career services/alumni office yet? I realize the economy is tough, but leveraging that network may get you an introduction to target firms and/or alumni that are currently employed there. Informational interviews are not a waste.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby JupiterJones » Fri Jul 12, 2013 2:35 pm

trapped959 wrote:I'm 28 and only make around $50k, and I feel like all my peers are surpassing me.


I know plenty of 28-year-olds who would kill to be making $50k. [Ignore --admin LadyGeek] your "peers". Your happiness in life is to a great extent inversely proportional to the amount of time you spend comparing yourself to other people.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby Grt2bOutdoors » Fri Jul 12, 2013 2:37 pm

ensign_lee wrote:Re: convo with manager

Just be upfront with him. Pull him aside and basically summarize what you said in your OP. That you want to try something different and that you were hoping he could help you move somewhere else within the company instead of outside the company altogether.


That could be a dangerous conversation if the OP and manager do not have a good working relationship or the timing is off. It's a signal to management that employee will leave if help is not granted and can potentially damage the relationship. Not all managers are accepting of such "I want to explore other opportunities" conversations - to the manager it translates into "I'm not happy, I want to leave" or "this is a dead-end job, being with you can only hurt my career" :oops: The time to have the discussion about career advancement is at the time of performance review - it's much easier to bring up the conversation in the context of "I've excelled at my job, my performance review reflects that, I'd like to explore potential opportunities in the company which would be mutually beneficial".
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby trapped959 » Fri Jul 12, 2013 2:44 pm

Grt2bOutdoors wrote:You're not too clear on exactly what function you fill at your employer? Are you truly working in corporate finance evaluating capital projects and/or acquisitions? or is your function more of a reporting type role? It sounds like the latter, only because your salary is quite low, but that may also be indicative of the industry you are in.

Before you make any moves including speaking with current employer, you should evaluate if you want to remain working in the industry currently in. You could transfer your skill set into other industries if they are similar. Corporate finance is corporate finance for most companies, you are evaluating NPV and IRR's. You can leverage your Ivy degree, have you spoken with career services/alumni office yet? I realize the economy is tough, but leveraging that network may get you an introduction to target firms and/or alumni that are currently employed there. Informational interviews are not a waste.


I'm in more of a strategic role, modeling and evaluating capital projects and acquisitions. A low salary is simply the reward for being loyal and staying with my company for the past 5 years. Any outside hire would be offered at least $25k more.

How hard would it be to switch to a different industry? That's ideally what I'd like to do, but what I've been struggling with. My best bet is probably trying to leverage my alumni network, so I'll focus more on doing that. Informational interviews seem like a great way to meet the right people in the industry. How receptive are people to meet with someone who emails them out of the blue? I guess I just need to be very persistent.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby mathwhiz » Fri Jul 12, 2013 2:47 pm

I'm pretty much stuck in the Boston area due to family.


I mention relocation because your Ivy league degree might hold more "cachet" outside of the northeast. Family is important but the tradeoff to staying in Boston may mean less opportunities for advancement compared to someone that is "mobile." It's a personal decision but one that you may have to come to terms with if you don't find the opportunities you want in Boston.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby Grt2bOutdoors » Fri Jul 12, 2013 2:57 pm

trapped959 wrote:
Grt2bOutdoors wrote:You're not too clear on exactly what function you fill at your employer? Are you truly working in corporate finance evaluating capital projects and/or acquisitions? or is your function more of a reporting type role? It sounds like the latter, only because your salary is quite low, but that may also be indicative of the industry you are in.

Before you make any moves including speaking with current employer, you should evaluate if you want to remain working in the industry currently in. You could transfer your skill set into other industries if they are similar. Corporate finance is corporate finance for most companies, you are evaluating NPV and IRR's. You can leverage your Ivy degree, have you spoken with career services/alumni office yet? I realize the economy is tough, but leveraging that network may get you an introduction to target firms and/or alumni that are currently employed there. Informational interviews are not a waste.


I'm in more of a strategic role, modeling and evaluating capital projects and acquisitions. A low salary is simply the reward for being loyal and staying with my company for the past 5 years. Any outside hire would be offered at least $25k more.

How hard would it be to switch to a different industry? That's ideally what I'd like to do, but what I've been struggling with. My best bet is probably trying to leverage my alumni network, so I'll focus more on doing that. Informational interviews seem like a great way to meet the right people in the industry. How receptive are people to meet with someone who emails them out of the blue? I guess I just need to be very persistent.


Those skills are transferable - NPV and IRR analysis requires the same inputs.

You don't e-mail your contact out of the blue. You contact your alumni office and see who/if anyone that has graduated or has a connection to the school has placed themselves on a list saying it's okay to be contacted for informational interviews. You speak with career services at your school - doesn't matter that you already graduated, even the second tier school I attended offers those services to its alumni. If that doesn't work, then you target the industry/company you desire to obtain the informational interview with, however, your letter to them is going to require a bit of resourcefulness on your part, a standard cookie-cutter letter will not get their attention - they are likely being bombarded with these types of requests.

I'm not exactly buying the "reward for being a loyal employee thing" and I should know, been at my employer longer than that - some rewards are intangible, being pegged as only a "gun for hire, sold to the highest bidder" is not the kind of reputation one wants to be known for if you are seeking to build a career within a company or industry (it can be a small world). I know you are posting on here for advice, but my biggest piece of advice is to be mindful of how you speak/act/write because it will be very apparent as you state in your post "feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job" and no future employer will want to interview/hire someone who may exhibit the same type of feelings later on after you've been in the position and the "honeymoon" period has elapsed.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby Grt2bOutdoors » Fri Jul 12, 2013 3:02 pm

mathwhiz wrote:
I'm pretty much stuck in the Boston area due to family.


I mention relocation because your Ivy league degree might hold more "cachet" outside of the northeast. Family is important but the tradeoff to staying in Boston may mean less opportunities for advancement compared to someone that is "mobile." It's a personal decision but one that you may have to come to terms with if you don't find the opportunities you want in Boston.


When I think of Boston, the following comes to mind, industry wise: Finance - banking,insurance and investment management, Consulting, Education, Technology, Healthcare/BioTech (surrounding areas - Cambridge) and Publishing. Those are the 6 target industries.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby billern » Fri Jul 12, 2013 3:26 pm

OP, for what it is worth, I went from a math degree and a minor in economics from a small liberal arts school, got an entry level job in public accounting, and took classes at a JC and state university to become a CPA. If you are in a state the requires a masters degree to be a CPA, the costs certainly could be higher but I think your $100K estimate for the schooling is very high.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby swaption » Fri Jul 12, 2013 3:31 pm

Way too much negativity my friend. First of all, at the age of 28 and presumably single it's just not possible to be "trapped" in anything. Forget about degrees and all that bs. Your undergrad is your undergrad. I don't care what you were compared to your peers, anything above a 3.0 at an Ivy league school is going to be way more of an asset than a hinderance.

First of all your job. There is no doubt plenty there that you are drastically undervaluing that is going on around you. Just learn as much as possible and always be open to opportunity, and when I say that I mean opportunity to add value in some form. I think the CFA program is a great idea. But you're 28, why are you still just thinking about it? Take the plunge. Sure you may feel overwhelmed at the outset, but step up to the challenge. The only thing that will genuinely make that undergrad experience go away in your mind is by approaching something new in a different way. So this is your opportunity. I think I may have been a good 10 years older than you when I took the same plunge, and I was both a new homeowner and father (second child, first was all of 18 months old at the time). I also was in a bit of a career malaise. Step up to that kind of challenge, and then we can talk about a career reset.

But the fact of the matter is at the age of 28 in your situation, you're not that far off pole position. Stop with the hard wired excuses by way of comparisons with others and talk of undergrad (do you realize how ridiculous that sounds). Much like investing, you can't live life looking in the rearview mirror. Read something inspirational involving those that have overcome some real adversity. The unfortunate byproduct of our comfortable society is that I think it leaves many convinced that they are not up to the task, but those people are wrong. The only thing that is missing is the opportunity to prove to themselves what they are capable of. Find that opportunity and then you can think about what you want to do next.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby connya » Fri Jul 12, 2013 3:54 pm

billern wrote:If you are in a state the requires a masters degree to be a CPA, the costs certainly could be higher but I think your $100K estimate for the schooling is very high.


I agree, it is very high.

CPA certification in Massachusetts only requires 30 specific credits beyond the finance degree you already have.

OP, I don't know if you're genuinely interested in accounting, but you could likely complete the schooling requirements with a single year's worth of classes, paying maybe 15k-20k at a place like UMass Amherst.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby Quickfoot » Fri Jul 12, 2013 4:00 pm

I spent 5 years in a job I hated because it paid extremely well and I didn't think I'd find another one. 7 years later I've had two jobs that pay more, at better companies with great benefits, and am way happier. Respectfully it seems like it may not be your job that's the problem, being happy in life is a choice. If your job is holding you back get a new one, 3.1 GPA isn't awesome but it isn't bad either and with your work experience you should be able to find one that you like more.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby Busting Myths » Fri Jul 12, 2013 4:05 pm

This is going to come off harsh but meant with love from someone who pondered the same lately.

trapped959 wrote:I work as a senior analyst in corporate finance and am starting to feel trapped in my current career path.

What is your corporate ladder like? Figure this one out and you will know if you are in a dead end job or not doing enough to advance.

trapped959 wrote: but I'm having trouble transitioning to something else.

What do you want to do?

trapped959 wrote: I was a math major at an Ivy with poor grades and a 3.1 overall GPA. I didn't know enough about finance in undergrad to work towards getting a summer internship at an investment bank or some other analyst-type position, so now I feel locked out of that career track entirely.

Where you graduated from only really matters when you are coming out of college. Who you know matters most when transitioning to a new industry.

trapped959 wrote: I'm 28 and only make around $50k, and I feel like all my peers are surpassing me.

Care about yourself, not your friends.

trapped959 wrote:I've thought about getting an MBA, but I think it's pretty useless if you can't get into Harvard, Stanford, or Wharton, which I doubt I will with my grades and work experience.

Think about an MBA as paying a cover charge for the VIP section at a club. The ones you want are about opening doors for Investment Banking if that is what you want to do. Fair warning, money in IB is selling an idea/product not crunching numbers.

trapped959 wrote:maybe I could study and take the CFA?

Three years of hell...trust me. Go check analystforums.com which is dedicated to the CFA and see what the consensus is. It provides for an opportunity to advance in a career track already started, not to bypass the initial steps of the ladder.

trapped959 wrote:I'd like to do business development, but I can't seem to get interviews from any of the companies I apply to. It seems they all want ex-MBB consultants or investment bankers. Any thoughts on what I should do? Thanks for your help.

The reason they want ex MBB Consultants or Investment Bankers is because they are glorified salesman with a contact list a mile long. You bring nothing to the table now other than playing a support role.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby swaption » Fri Jul 12, 2013 4:09 pm

trapped959 wrote:How hard would it be to switch to a different industry? That's ideally what I'd like to do, but what I've been struggling with. My best bet is probably trying to leverage my alumni network, so I'll focus more on doing that. Informational interviews seem like a great way to meet the right people in the industry. How receptive are people to meet with someone who emails them out of the blue? I guess I just need to be very persistent.


FYI, a soon to be grad at a top 10 b school e-mailed me a couple of months ago. I'm part of the alumni network, but I rarely get these kinds of inquiries. We chatted on the phone, and she sounded decent. A colleague of mine had a position to fill, and as I sit here looking across the floor I can see her now finishing her third week in a new job. She was obviously very appreciative. But I told her that I was here for anyone to reach. But anyone did not reach me, she did. That reflects very well on her efforts, and is completely her doing. You make your own luck.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby Andyrunner » Fri Jul 12, 2013 4:17 pm

ensign_lee wrote:Re: convo with manager

Just be upfront with him. Pull him aside and basically summarize what you said in your OP. That you want to try something different and that you were hoping he could help you move somewhere else within the company instead of outside the company altogether.


This. Any good manager would understand his workers and figure they want to move on at some point, especially the younger ones. Also it works to their benefit as if he pushes you to a new area and you do a good job, he gets recognized by his peers for being a good leader and churning out high quality workers.

Finally on the pay...50k is decent pay for 28yrs old (Im 28 and making 55k). Money is a means to an end...who cares if your peers make more then you. Do what makes you happy, not trying to be a high roller.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby boggler » Fri Jul 12, 2013 4:20 pm

swaption wrote:
trapped959 wrote:How hard would it be to switch to a different industry? That's ideally what I'd like to do, but what I've been struggling with. My best bet is probably trying to leverage my alumni network, so I'll focus more on doing that. Informational interviews seem like a great way to meet the right people in the industry. How receptive are people to meet with someone who emails them out of the blue? I guess I just need to be very persistent.


FYI, a soon to be grad at a top 10 b school e-mailed me a couple of months ago. I'm part of the alumni network, but I rarely get these kinds of inquiries. We chatted on the phone, and she sounded decent. A colleague of mine had a position to fill, and as I sit here looking across the floor I can see her now finishing her third week in a new job. She was obviously very appreciative. But I told her that I was here for anyone to reach. But anyone did not reach me, she did. That reflects very well on her efforts, and is completely her doing. You make your own luck.


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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby snyder66 » Fri Jul 12, 2013 5:05 pm

How much money do you need to make? What can you get by on, money-wise? What do you enjoy doing? If you can survive on less, consider pursuing something you actually enjoy.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby trapped959 » Sat Jul 13, 2013 12:27 pm

swaption wrote:There is no doubt plenty there that you are drastically undervaluing that is going on around you. Just learn as much as possible and always be open to opportunity, and when I say that I mean opportunity to add value in some form.

trapped959 wrote:What is your corporate ladder like? Figure this one out and you will know if you are in a dead end job or not doing enough.


Perhaps I was a little overly dramatic yesterday. I'm part of a small, newly-formed department that provides financial support to our core business and helps to shape the strategic direction of our company. Two levels above me is the head of finance, who works closely with the VP and CEO. They all know who I am, so the visibility is there. I was even given an award by the CEO for the work I did in securing $25m in new business, or $5m in profit for 5 yrs (so $25m total). I've been getting promotions every 2 yrs along with 20% raises. I started off low just out of school though, so the salary still seems low compared to other industries. I just worry that if I ever were to lose this job, I wouldn't be able to find something similar. I want to be sure that the work I'm doing will be seen as valuable by potential future employers. I don't want to be shut out from positions just because I didn't work for MBB or GS right out of school.

Edit: Let me know if I'm being naive, but I want to believe that if I just focus on doing well in my current job that the salary will come in the future. I also want to believe that it's not a mistake to stay with one employer for a long time. I see a lot of people my age only staying in a job for 2-3 years before moving on. I see virtue in staying with a single employer that you like and believe will be profitable for the long-run, but this could also be viewed as complacency on my part. I am in some sense afraid to take risk in my career and see what else is out there.

snyder66 wrote:How much money do you need to make? What can you get by on, money-wise? What do you enjoy doing? If you can survive on less, consider pursuing something you actually enjoy.


I could get by on spending $20k per year. I've tried not to ramp up my lifestyle dramatically since getting married. I currently save about 40% of my pay and max out both my 401k and Roth IRA each year. I have about $130k in total retirement savings.
Last edited by trapped959 on Sat Jul 13, 2013 1:26 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby LadyGeek » Sat Jul 13, 2013 1:06 pm

Andyrunner wrote:
ensign_lee wrote:Re: convo with manager

Just be upfront with him. Pull him aside and basically summarize what you said in your OP. That you want to try something different and that you were hoping he could help you move somewhere else within the company instead of outside the company altogether.


This. Any good manager would understand his workers and figure they want to move on at some point, especially the younger ones. Also it works to their benefit as if he pushes you to a new area and you do a good job, he gets recognized by his peers for being a good leader and churning out high quality workers.

Piling on here. This is the single most important thing you should do. A manager's job is to grow their employees. Sure, they'll be disappointed that you want to move on. However, they get a feeling of pride that they helped move you ahead. (A rephrasing of Andyrunner, but it's accurate and I've seen this first-hand.)

The worst possible thing you can do is to leave the company without so much as a hint that anything was wrong.

The first step - setup an appointment with your manager to talk about your job performance and career path. Sit down with him/her and lay out the facts. Don't discuss your peers; that's irrelevant and might show immaturity on your part. Ask for assistance, then layout a career path. The most important part is to execute the plan.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby leonard » Sat Jul 13, 2013 1:51 pm

Read the book Corporate Confidential to get a different perspective on the way organizations work. Call it cynical or not - there are useful insights about how to work within corporations.

Another thing - you need to completely surpress any outward negativity at work. Studies have shown that people want to be around positive, can do people at work. If you are more a natural cynic - as I will admit to being as well - FAKE IT. Try to find ways to make your interactions at work. Don't say "yes" to everything and overcommit and underdeliver. But, do try to find positive ways to provide feedback and bring solutions to problems. As others have said - your post comes across negative - just don't be that way at work.

Make yourself invaluable to your manager and your company. Do what they prioritize and build the relationship.

Make yourself invaluable to managers and department heads in related departments where you might want to move. When managers are discussing who to assign to that new project that may push your career in the direction you want - your name needs to be the first or second they think of. To some extent - this is playing politics - but like it or not - sometimes that has to be done.

I think the above will provide much more value and move you forward more than additional degrees.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby Kulak » Mon Jul 15, 2013 12:06 pm

trapped959 wrote:I was a math major at an Ivy with poor grades and a 3.1 overall GPA.

Nice work, seriously. FWIW I'm envious of this.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby arthurb999 » Mon Jul 15, 2013 2:19 pm

There are some strong schools in Boston area for part time MBA (BU, BC, Northeastern, Bently, etc).
I would go that route and have the company pay for it....
Then jump ship.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby mako171 » Mon Jul 15, 2013 11:14 pm

Dude, you are 28 and have 130k banked for retirement?! You are WAY ahead of your peers.
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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby Kalo » Tue Jul 16, 2013 1:00 am

You say you don't find the work interesting or challenging any more. That stands out to me among everything else you wrote.

I recommend putting some real energy into figuring out what you want to do. The good side of making 50K per year is that it's not so high that you can't replace it fairly easily in many other career paths. At your age you have a lot of years of working ahead of you. Don't spend your life doing something you don't enjoy.

Can't remember who said it, but it's something like "if you do what you love, you'll never work another day in your life."

And another, one of my favorites: "I'd rather be standing at the bottom of a ladder I want to climb, than half way up a ladder I don't want to climb."

Figure out what you can be passionate about and hopefully there will be some career associated with it that will pay you enough to live on. Then your passion may turn it into more than just a living.

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Re: Feeling trapped in a dead-end finance job

Postby TigerNest » Tue Jul 16, 2013 1:33 am

I was in a very similar position to you a few years ago. I graduated from an ivy with a similar GPA. I’m 30 now, doing corporate development and M&A.

The degree has definitely been an asset, and the GPA has barely mattered. No one ever asks for my GPA, but the name recognition definitely helped me get some interviews. However, the biggest asset to my career development has been the knowledge I gained from post-school studying for the CFA and CPA exams.

I ended up starting the CFA program at ~ 25 years old, and received the charter at age 29. I also went to community college for 2 years to get an accounting certificate, and am now prepping for the CPA exams. All in, my community college cost me about $5,000, and the CFA was less than $2,000. Both were money incredibly well spent, and I don’t even mean for the credentials themselves. They’re nice to have, but the main benefit has been the thorough understanding of accounting & finance that I gained from each program. It’s really helped me be more confident and competent at work.

I recommend reflecting on where you want to be in 15-20 years, and working your way backwards from there to see what your career path should look like to get there. An MBA might prove valuable for you (your undergrad GPA won’t stop you from getting into the top 10 if you score well on the GMAT and tell a good story), but so can a CPA or CFA charter.

As for i-banking… to my surprise, I was given the opportunity to transition to a bulge bracket recently, but I turned it down. It was a goal of mine for a long time, but the hours are now just too much for me. It’s a perfect job for an ambitious 22 year old, but not for a 30 year old. I’m now thinking about starting a family, and it’s not the kind of life I want to live. I’d rather have a rigorous job that lets me go home before the sun comes up. It’s something to think about.

Anyway, good luck!
TigerNest
 
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