What's a better term for 'retired'?

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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby VictoriaF » Fri Feb 01, 2013 11:57 pm

A player.

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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby Garco » Sat Feb 02, 2013 12:11 am

Free at last.

H/T to Martin Luther King: "Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!"
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby 22twain » Sat Feb 02, 2013 2:22 am

Discretionarily occupied.
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby heyyou » Sat Feb 02, 2013 4:53 am

Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?


Happiest years of my life
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby sschullo » Sat Feb 02, 2013 5:06 am

Lucky and happy to be "retired," no matter how the experience is labeled.
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby mptfan » Sat Feb 02, 2013 9:18 am

Fund manager.
I eat risk for breakfast. :)
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Re: Age at retirement.

Postby 3504PIR » Sat Feb 02, 2013 9:59 am

Taylor Larimore wrote:
3504PIR wrote:Taylor, what age did you retire?


57 (now 89).

Best wishes.
Taylor


Excellent! Well done.
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby Mr Grumpy » Sat Feb 02, 2013 10:05 am

I like the term "retired" : verb - "to withdraw, to remove oneself". Has a nice self-absorbed vibe to it.
No good?, how about "x-j" or ex-j": without job.
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby Latecomer » Sat Feb 02, 2013 10:15 am

"Re-purposed" :)
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Re: Age at retirement.

Postby EternalOptimist » Sat Feb 02, 2013 10:23 am

Taylor Larimore wrote:
3504PIR wrote:Taylor, what age did you retire?


57 (now 89).

Best wishes.
Taylor



God bless Taylor, you are my hero :beer
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby EternalOptimist » Sat Feb 02, 2013 10:25 am

mptfan wrote:Fund manager.



Or 'fun' manager
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby Don Christy » Sat Feb 02, 2013 11:09 am

Lifestyle coach
Ah, make the most of what we may yet spend, Before we too into the Dust descend; Dust into Dust, and under Dust, to lie; Sans Wine, sans Song, sans Singer, and -- sans End! ... Omar Khayyam
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby Don Christy » Sat Feb 02, 2013 11:14 am

Private Wealth Manager
Ah, make the most of what we may yet spend, Before we too into the Dust descend; Dust into Dust, and under Dust, to lie; Sans Wine, sans Song, sans Singer, and -- sans End! ... Omar Khayyam
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby desertbandit442 » Sat Feb 02, 2013 12:50 pm

Couldn't resist. How about Private Investment Management Provider (PIMP) :twisted:
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby Dandy » Sun Feb 03, 2013 1:02 am

rat race observer
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby umfundi » Sun Feb 03, 2013 1:09 am

I'm done. Your problem now.

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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby ResNullius » Sun Feb 03, 2013 10:50 am

I have no problem saying that I'm retired. On the other hand, my wife can't stand it when anyone suggests that she's semi-retired. She works three mornings a week, that's it. She doesn't need to work, she likes for people to think she's working heavy part-time. I don't understand it, but she'll be fully retired in a year or two whether she wants to or not. Other than saying retired, I sometimes tell people that I'm a "rcovering lawyer." They usually catch the humor.
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby Rodc » Sun Feb 03, 2013 10:55 am

I think "financially independent" for when I retire. Really that is the goal. That is the goal is to get to a place where I do not need to work rather than not working. I can work if I want. No work, full time, part time, paid, unpaid, all my choice.

I won't be wealthy so I won't be independently wealthy (seems to me the independently in that phrase is unnecessary anyway) and that is not may goal, even if somehow it happened.

I do like the suggested addition of "free spirit" that was suggested early in the thread.
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby chaz » Sun Feb 03, 2013 6:48 pm

I also like "financially independent".
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby Abe » Sun Feb 03, 2013 7:18 pm

How about: "I'm re-tor'-ded" :wink:
Last edited by Abe on Mon Feb 04, 2013 10:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby Jay69 » Sun Feb 03, 2013 10:18 pm

desertbandit442 wrote:Couldn't resist. How about Private Investment Management Provider (PIMP) :twisted:


I vote for this one!, I need to write this one down.
"Out of clutter, find simplicity” Albert Einstein
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby texasdiver » Sun Feb 03, 2013 10:37 pm

Coasting...


It's what my 75 year old Dad says he gets to do now that he is "over the hill"
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby NAVigator » Mon Feb 04, 2013 12:17 am

At a company where I worked, they held "pre-planning" meetings. I just figured that concept came from Dilbert. Now that I am no longer employed, this must be the post-planning phase. Since I retired due to a disability, perhaps this is the unplanned phase?

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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby CABob » Mon Feb 04, 2013 12:33 am

How about "sequeller"?
Sequel definition - What follows that continues the story of an earlier one.
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby cheese_breath » Mon Feb 04, 2013 12:43 am

I fired my boss?
The surest way to know the future is when it's the past.
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby graveday » Mon Feb 04, 2013 1:10 am

VictoriaF wrote:
Calm Man wrote:
The Wizard wrote:Unemployed.

...you can say you are a consultant.

I prefer a student.

Victoria


They are younger.
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby graveday » Mon Feb 04, 2013 1:16 am

Just say retired. It is short and sweet and everyone understands. Then you can start telling lies.
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby thebogledude » Mon Feb 04, 2013 1:24 am

if you play golf, you can say you're a golfer.
-or domestic engineer.
but at the end of the day, it's really about how you spend your time
rather than what people think.
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby lindisfarne » Mon Feb 04, 2013 1:50 am

Why do you have an issue with saying you're retired? It's not the word that's bothering you.
What you do depends on what your interests and skills are ... could you help out neighbors who can use it (advice on maintenance, lawn care, finance)? Teach something in a community ed. program? Volunteer for Habitat for Humanity (they are very good at working with people with no home building/repair skills & you'll learn valuable skills along the way).

If you don't like not doing something formal on a regular basis, there are plenty of ways to use your skills as a volunteer. You might be able to provide mentorship to someone/some people who would benefit from the knowledge you've gained in your field.
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby Levett » Mon Feb 04, 2013 8:24 am

Ordinarily, the exchange I have with new acquaintances goes something like this:

New acquaintance (very politely): "What do you do?"

Me (no less politely): "I don't work."

New acquaintance: "Oh, you are retired?"

Me: "Yes. I am a man of leisure--perhaps a gentleman" (in the old sense of the word).

And then the conversation either moves on to how I spend my day, what did I formerly do, or would I like to have coffee or, better yet, a beer. :sharebeer

I must say that in the years I have been retired it has always seemed to me that the word "retired" elicits envy. So why would I want to avoid the word "retired'? :)

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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby scrabbler1 » Mon Feb 04, 2013 9:37 am

"I'm retired" works just fine for me whenever I am asked what I "do." :)
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby EternalOptimist » Mon Feb 04, 2013 12:23 pm

thebogledude wrote:if you play golf, you can say you're a golfer.
-or domestic engineer.
but at the end of the day, it's really about how you spend your time
rather than what people think.



Right...at the end of the day who cares about what others think, it's what I think of myself :thumbsup
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby wilson08 » Mon Feb 04, 2013 12:37 pm

Freelance Engineer

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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby ThatGuy » Mon Feb 04, 2013 12:55 pm

This reminds me of the common refrain never to call someone an ex-Marine. But is former really all that different?

Or in this case, what is so insulting about the word retired?
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby VictoriaF » Mon Feb 04, 2013 1:12 pm

The problem with the word "retired" is not that it is insulting but that it brings up certain stereotypes, emotions, and even physical reactions. In a psychological experiment a test group of college students was primed by having to unscramble words "retirement," "Florida," "bingo," and alike. A control group of students unscrambled some neutral words. After the unscrambling part, the real experiment started when the students had to walk a long corridor to collect their reward for participating in the experiment. The members of the test group walked significantly slower than the members of the control group.

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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby at ease » Mon Feb 04, 2013 2:14 pm

....i'm a restaholic.....(at least according to my wife..)
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby lindisfarne » Mon Feb 04, 2013 2:34 pm

VictoriaF wrote:The problem with the word "retired" is not that it is insulting but that it brings up certain stereotypes, emotions, and even physical reactions. In a psychological experiment a test group of college students was primed by having to unscramble words "retirement," "Florida," "bingo," and alike. A control group of students unscrambled some neutral words. After the unscrambling part, the real experiment started when the students had to walk a long corridor to collect their reward for participating in the experiment. The members of the test group walked significantly slower than the members of the control group.

Victoria



Is it bad that people walked slower? (We keep hearing how we're overly stressed by our 24/7 society).
Has the result been replicated? Even if it has, you'd need some additional information/data before you could even begin to infer WHY they walked more slowly. Assuming that it reflects the way retired people moves is not a legitimate inference without other data. Perhaps they were thinking about grandparents who are retired. Perhaps they were thinking about the FL beaches where they planned to spend spring break.

Even if they did walk more slowly ... what does that mean? Perhaps they were considering their asset allocation in their portfolios.
Last edited by lindisfarne on Mon Feb 04, 2013 2:39 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby CarlZ993 » Mon Feb 04, 2013 2:37 pm

An Adventurer and Gentleman of Leisure.
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby VictoriaF » Mon Feb 04, 2013 3:18 pm

lindisfarne wrote:
VictoriaF wrote:The problem with the word "retired" is not that it is insulting but that it brings up certain stereotypes, emotions, and even physical reactions. In a psychological experiment a test group of college students was primed by having to unscramble words "retirement," "Florida," "bingo," and alike. A control group of students unscrambled some neutral words. After the unscrambling part, the real experiment started when the students had to walk a long corridor to collect their reward for participating in the experiment. The members of the test group walked significantly slower than the members of the control group.

Victoria



Is it bad that people walked slower? (We keep hearing how we're overly stressed by our 24/7 society).
Has the result been replicated? Even if it has, you'd need some additional information/data before you could even begin to infer WHY they walked more slowly. Assuming that it reflects the way retired people moves is not a legitimate inference without other data. Perhaps they were thinking about grandparents who are retired. Perhaps they were thinking about the FL beaches where they planned to spend spring break.

Even if they did walk more slowly ... what does that mean? Perhaps they were considering their asset allocation in their portfolios.


You are making good points. I have to find the source paper for the answers. Here are some thoughts from the top of my head.

A fast-paced walk helps relieving stress, probably more so than it serves as a sign of stress. The speed of walking correlates with the general state of health. In the experiment I mentioned, the students must have quickly recovered from a brief exposure to retirement; but it is possible that truly retired people slow down not due to physical causes but due to a changed self-perception.

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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby Fallible » Mon Feb 04, 2013 3:58 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
lindisfarne wrote:
VictoriaF wrote:The problem with the word "retired" is not that it is insulting but that it brings up certain stereotypes, emotions, and even physical reactions. In a psychological experiment a test group of college students was primed by having to unscramble words "retirement," "Florida," "bingo," and alike. A control group of students unscrambled some neutral words. After the unscrambling part, the real experiment started when the students had to walk a long corridor to collect their reward for participating in the experiment. The members of the test group walked significantly slower than the members of the control group.

Victoria



Is it bad that people walked slower? (We keep hearing how we're overly stressed by our 24/7 society).
Has the result been replicated? Even if it has, you'd need some additional information/data before you could even begin to infer WHY they walked more slowly. Assuming that it reflects the way retired people moves is not a legitimate inference without other data. Perhaps they were thinking about grandparents who are retired. Perhaps they were thinking about the FL beaches where they planned to spend spring break.

Even if they did walk more slowly ... what does that mean? Perhaps they were considering their asset allocation in their portfolios.


You are making good points. I have to find the source paper for the answers. Here are some thoughts from the top of my head.

A fast-paced walk helps relieving stress, probably more so than it serves as a sign of stress. The speed of walking correlates with the general state of health. In the experiment I mentioned, the students must have quickly recovered from a brief exposure to retirement; but it is possible that truly retired people slow down not due to physical causes but due to a changed self-perception.

Victoria


This is not in direct response to the experiment, but it's interesting because this thread and another current one on daily retirement got me thinking whether we significantly change in retirement, in my case mainly whether I, a Type A, had slowed down, but also whether I had become (or always was) a somewhat different person with different interests, skills, etc. After all, by the time most of us retire, some 50 or 60 years of our lives have been pretty much dictated by the demands and routines of school and careers. But is that who we really are? If it is, are we more than that? Better than that? Or pretty much the same? Depends on the individual, of course. Any experiments, research done on this? Maybe this is the subject of another forum topic: how have we, or have we, changed in retirement?
"The first principle is that you must not fool yourself - and you are the easiest person to fool." ~ Richard Feynman
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby htdrag11 » Mon Feb 04, 2013 4:34 pm

This will be my last year paying and filing for my LLC annual report.

I still called myself an IT Consultant, or simply Retired - getting dumb and happy (but not fat - doing 3 miles plus daily)!
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby VictoriaF » Mon Feb 04, 2013 4:42 pm

Fallible wrote:Maybe this is the subject of another forum topic: how have we, or have we, changed in retirement?


It would be a good topic of its own. Please consider starting a discussion.

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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby Levett » Mon Feb 04, 2013 6:05 pm

"how have we, or have we, changed in retirement?"

My kids asked me a version of that question early in my retirement.

My answer was simple and truthful: I'm more of the kid I was, except I don't have to ask my parents for an allowance. :)

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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby Fallible » Mon Feb 04, 2013 6:42 pm

Levett wrote:"how have we, or have we, changed in retirement?"

My kids asked me a version of that question early in my retirement.

My answer was simple and truthful: I'm more of the kid I was, except I don't have to ask my parents for an allowance. :)

Lev


So we "old" retirees can be kids again! BTW, I'm working on a topic on the subject now so maybe you'd want to expand on your comment there, like how your kids responded to your "kid" reply.
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby Levett » Mon Feb 04, 2013 6:55 pm

Cross my heart and hope not to die (too soon). They loved it.

They think my wife and I are cool (they may be in denial).

But we do have a lot of fun with our grown kids and our grandchildren even though we all live in different states.

Perhaps distance makes the heart grow fonder! :wink:

It seems to me essential that you tell your kids and grandkids that not only do you love them but that you've had a good life and that you are lucky to have had a retirement.

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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby fandango » Mon Feb 04, 2013 7:39 pm

I say that I am "reinvented".
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby Braumeister » Mon Feb 04, 2013 7:45 pm

Since I keep track of my own finances and plan for my future, I call myself an economist. Practically guaranteed to get the questioner to change the subject. 8-)
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Re: What's a better term for 'retired'?

Postby graveday » Mon Feb 04, 2013 8:48 pm

Braumeister wrote:Since I keep track of my own finances and plan for my future, I call myself an economist. Practically guaranteed to get the questioner to change the subject. 8-)


Nice.

"Late to the party" just occured to me.
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