Learn Guitar or Piano?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities

Guitar or Piano?

Guitar
46
51%
Piano
44
49%
 
Total votes : 90

Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby JupiterJones » Fri Jul 26, 2013 3:37 pm

Fallible wrote:like an accordion. :)


Let's hope! :D
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Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby stemikger » Fri Jul 26, 2013 6:41 pm

lightheir wrote:Guitar: VERY easy to start up and not sound terrible, but learning curve gets significantly steeper once you start doing things other than the most basic of simple chords.

Piano: Also fairly easy to start and not sound terrible, but difficulty increase a lot with 2-hand technique, and once you start seriously playing without looking at the keys, it's hard and takes alot of practice.

Violin: The hardest (by far) of all three instruments to sound decent on. Prepare to sound terrible for at least a year, if not longer, and you'll be lucky to even get to the point where you can play 'beautiful' music unless you take it very seriously.

Of course, at the higher/highest levels, difficulty is limitless and thus can't be compared amongst the three. However, in terms of ease of startup and to play music that someone else could find enjoyable (and not awful), it's guitar then piano, and then violin in terms of the early learning curve difficulty.


I agree with you, but there is one easier alternative. The ukulele is even easier than the guitar. I have been playing guitar for over 20 years on and off and two years ago I bought a ukulele. I always thought the fingering would be the same as the guitar, but actually that was pretty stupid of me because the ukulele only has 4 strings. After buying a good song book that showed the chord diagrams I could not believe how nice it sounded. After this experience with the uke all I kept thinking was what a great instrument for someone who might be having difficulty learning to play the guitar. I could see someone with no experience playing a song on the Uke in about two weeks and it's so easy to learn other songs once you get one down.

For those who are interested I bought a Fluke Flea ukulele which cost about $175.
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Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby gkaplan » Fri Jul 26, 2013 7:01 pm

stemikger wrote:
lightheir wrote:Guitar: VERY easy to start up and not sound terrible, but learning curve gets significantly steeper once you start doing things other than the most basic of simple chords.

Piano: Also fairly easy to start and not sound terrible, but difficulty increase a lot with 2-hand technique, and once you start seriously playing without looking at the keys, it's hard and takes alot of practice.

Violin: The hardest (by far) of all three instruments to sound decent on. Prepare to sound terrible for at least a year, if not longer, and you'll be lucky to even get to the point where you can play 'beautiful' music unless you take it very seriously.

Of course, at the higher/highest levels, difficulty is limitless and thus can't be compared amongst the three. However, in terms of ease of startup and to play music that someone else could find enjoyable (and not awful), it's guitar then piano, and then violin in terms of the early learning curve difficulty.


I agree with you, but there is one easier alternative. The ukulele is even easier than the guitar. I have been playing guitar for over 20 years on and off and two years ago I bought a ukulele. I always thought the fingering would be the same as the guitar, but actually that was pretty stupid of me because the ukulele only has 4 strings. After buying a good song book that showed the chord diagrams I could not believe how nice it sounded. After this experience with the uke all I kept thinking was what a great instrument for someone who might be having difficulty learning to play the guitar. I could see someone with no experience playing a song on the Uke in about two weeks and it's so easy to learn other songs once you get one down.

For those who are interested I bought a Fluke Flea ukulele which cost about $175.


Unfortunately, whenever I think of ukeleles and ukulele players, I think of Tiny Tim. It just doesn't seem like a cool instrument. Maybe, I'll try it, though.
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Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby leonard » Fri Jul 26, 2013 7:56 pm

stemikger wrote:
leonard wrote:Huh? I have a bunch of guitars and I have yet to have found the easy to play one that people have found on this thread. Not to mention they conquered all the modes of the major scale - as well as the hundred or so other scales that I can find just browsing online. As well as all the variations of the chords. On maybe a 7 or 8 string guitar?

As well as the various picking skills: Finger Picking: Country, classical, Flamanco-style. Flatpicking: Rock, classical, bluegrass, blue, etc. Slide Guitar.

Need to find me one of those easy guitars.


It sounds like you are trying to run before you can walk. First thing is to learn all the major open chords (there are only 7 A to G), don't get hung up on their variations. Buy a song book from a band or artist you really like (i.e., James Taylor or the Beatles). Make sure the fingering chord diagrams are included in the book. From there learn a song a week, month or however long it takes.

As far as all the picking, strumming, etc. That is not something that you really learn, just strum and pick with a pick or your fingers. Have fun. You are not going to become a professional but you certainly can get good enough to break out your guitar and play a song.

Don't worry about learning theory. Just learn the chords of the songs you want to play. You Tube is also a great place to learn.


Totally disagree.

Only by learning some of the theory can you do something like figure out what key a song is in and then figure out all the chord changes. If you don't understand the major scale - then this will be very difficult.

Plus, I am finding that many of those songs we think are just chords "E, A, and B" have color added in the form of scales and unique chord voicings. Only by actually studying and internalizing those versions can you really then pick out what is really going on in songs. Try playing some funk or soul without a ninth chord and you will see what I mean.

Song books and learning through TAB only get you so far. If that's the distance you are looking for, then by all means.

As to picking technique - not something you learn? You have to study and practice IF you want to get proficient with flatpicking techniques (alternate, string skipping, etc), banjo roll (with all fingers - not just thumb and 2 fingers), classical, flamenco, country picking/bends, etc. Self accompaniment - using the thumb to take the bassline. Each of these techniques can be combined and added to your playing in to something completely unique - as you see fit. But, only if one takes the time to learn them. The idea that one is just going to "pick up" the banjo roll or flamenco picking technique simply be playing songs but not practicing technique is misguided.
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Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby stemikger » Sat Jul 27, 2013 2:16 am

leonard wrote:
stemikger wrote:
leonard wrote:Huh? I have a bunch of guitars and I have yet to have found the easy to play one that people have found on this thread. Not to mention they conquered all the modes of the major scale - as well as the hundred or so other scales that I can find just browsing online. As well as all the variations of the chords. On maybe a 7 or 8 string guitar?

As well as the various picking skills: Finger Picking: Country, classical, Flamanco-style. Flatpicking: Rock, classical, bluegrass, blue, etc. Slide Guitar.

Need to find me one of those easy guitars.


It sounds like you are trying to run before you can walk. First thing is to learn all the major open chords (there are only 7 A to G), don't get hung up on their variations. Buy a song book from a band or artist you really like (i.e., James Taylor or the Beatles). Make sure the fingering chord diagrams are included in the book. From there learn a song a week, month or however long it takes.

As far as all the picking, strumming, etc. That is not something that you really learn, just strum and pick with a pick or your fingers. Have fun. You are not going to become a professional but you certainly can get good enough to break out your guitar and play a song.

Don't worry about learning theory. Just learn the chords of the songs you want to play. You Tube is also a great place to learn.


Totally disagree.

Only by learning some of the theory can you do something like figure out what key a song is in and then figure out all the chord changes. If you don't understand the major scale - then this will be very difficult.

Plus, I am finding that many of those songs we think are just chords "E, A, and B" have color added in the form of scales and unique chord voicings. Only by actually studying and internalizing those versions can you really then pick out what is really going on in songs. Try playing some funk or soul without a ninth chord and you will see what I mean.

Song books and learning through TAB only get you so far. If that's the distance you are looking for, then by all means.

As to picking technique - not something you learn? You have to study and practice IF you want to get proficient with flatpicking techniques (alternate, string skipping, etc), banjo roll (with all fingers - not just thumb and 2 fingers), classical, flamenco, country picking/bends, etc. Self accompaniment - using the thumb to take the bassline. Each of these techniques can be combined and added to your playing in to something completely unique - as you see fit. But, only if one takes the time to learn them. The idea that one is just going to "pick up" the banjo roll or flamenco picking technique simply be playing songs but not practicing technique is misguided.


Hey Man, if you want to make it more difficult go for it. As for me, I am sitting here playing some sweet Jim Croce songs and enjoying every second.

By the way Eddie Van Halen is one of the greatest rock guitar players in the world and does not know how to read music and never had any formal training. Totally self-taught.
Last edited by stemikger on Sat Jul 27, 2013 2:36 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby stemikger » Sat Jul 27, 2013 2:22 am

gkaplan wrote:
stemikger wrote:
lightheir wrote:Guitar: VERY easy to start up and not sound terrible, but learning curve gets significantly steeper once you start doing things other than the most basic of simple chords.

Piano: Also fairly easy to start and not sound terrible, but difficulty increase a lot with 2-hand technique, and once you start seriously playing without looking at the keys, it's hard and takes alot of practice.

Violin: The hardest (by far) of all three instruments to sound decent on. Prepare to sound terrible for at least a year, if not longer, and you'll be lucky to even get to the point where you can play 'beautiful' music unless you take it very seriously.

Of course, at the higher/highest levels, difficulty is limitless and thus can't be compared amongst the three. However, in terms of ease of startup and to play music that someone else could find enjoyable (and not awful), it's guitar then piano, and then violin in terms of the early learning curve difficulty.


I agree with you, but there is one easier alternative. The ukulele is even easier than the guitar. I have been playing guitar for over 20 years on and off and two years ago I bought a ukulele. I always thought the fingering would be the same as the guitar, but actually that was pretty stupid of me because the ukulele only has 4 strings. After buying a good song book that showed the chord diagrams I could not believe how nice it sounded. After this experience with the uke all I kept thinking was what a great instrument for someone who might be having difficulty learning to play the guitar. I could see someone with no experience playing a song on the Uke in about two weeks and it's so easy to learn other songs once you get one down.

For those who are interested I bought a Fluke Flea ukulele which cost about $175.


Unfortunately, whenever I think of ukeleles and ukulele players, I think of Tiny Tim. It just doesn't seem like a cool instrument. Maybe, I'll try it, though.


That is the image I had also. However, it has made a big comeback with the younger generation and the funny thing is now that I play it more than my guitar, I notice how many commercials have the uke playing. It's a much fuller sound then I imagined and much more versatile. Check out some amazing Uke players on You Tube and you will see what I mean. Here is one example:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E2OEuyF_2u8
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Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby guitarguy » Sat Jul 27, 2013 9:18 am

stemikger wrote:
leonard wrote:
stemikger wrote:
leonard wrote:Huh? I have a bunch of guitars and I have yet to have found the easy to play one that people have found on this thread. Not to mention they conquered all the modes of the major scale - as well as the hundred or so other scales that I can find just browsing online. As well as all the variations of the chords. On maybe a 7 or 8 string guitar?

As well as the various picking skills: Finger Picking: Country, classical, Flamanco-style. Flatpicking: Rock, classical, bluegrass, blue, etc. Slide Guitar.

Need to find me one of those easy guitars.


It sounds like you are trying to run before you can walk. First thing is to learn all the major open chords (there are only 7 A to G), don't get hung up on their variations. Buy a song book from a band or artist you really like (i.e., James Taylor or the Beatles). Make sure the fingering chord diagrams are included in the book. From there learn a song a week, month or however long it takes.

As far as all the picking, strumming, etc. That is not something that you really learn, just strum and pick with a pick or your fingers. Have fun. You are not going to become a professional but you certainly can get good enough to break out your guitar and play a song.

Don't worry about learning theory. Just learn the chords of the songs you want to play. You Tube is also a great place to learn.


Totally disagree.

Only by learning some of the theory can you do something like figure out what key a song is in and then figure out all the chord changes. If you don't understand the major scale - then this will be very difficult.

Plus, I am finding that many of those songs we think are just chords "E, A, and B" have color added in the form of scales and unique chord voicings. Only by actually studying and internalizing those versions can you really then pick out what is really going on in songs. Try playing some funk or soul without a ninth chord and you will see what I mean.

Song books and learning through TAB only get you so far. If that's the distance you are looking for, then by all means.

As to picking technique - not something you learn? You have to study and practice IF you want to get proficient with flatpicking techniques (alternate, string skipping, etc), banjo roll (with all fingers - not just thumb and 2 fingers), classical, flamenco, country picking/bends, etc. Self accompaniment - using the thumb to take the bassline. Each of these techniques can be combined and added to your playing in to something completely unique - as you see fit. But, only if one takes the time to learn them. The idea that one is just going to "pick up" the banjo roll or flamenco picking technique simply be playing songs but not practicing technique is misguided.


Hey Man, if you want to make it more difficult go for it. As for me, I am sitting here playing some sweet Jim Croce songs and enjoying every second.

By the way Eddie Van Halen is one of the greatest rock guitar players in the world and does not know how to read music and never had any formal training. Totally self-taught.


It all depends on what your goals are.

Theory is NOT easy to learn. At least it wasn't for me. I was totally self taught and performed in bars and clubs for 2 years or so before ever taking a guitar lesson. At that point I decided to take lessons because I really wanted to expand my knowledge and learn what I was actually playing. Learning all the notes, modes, triads, lots of different chord voicings and what they actually were opened up a whole new world to me. I'd been playing 9th chords all day but never knew what the heck they actually were. Probably the biggest thing lessons taught me though was to be able to pick out notes everywhere on my fretboard on the spot without having to think about it. That, and learning how to play different voicings (my bass player appreciates the fact that I don't play a lot of root notes anymore!) were huge.

So again, it all depends on what your goals are. Taking lessons right off the bat and just trying to learn some simple things for yourself are both perfectly fine ways of beginning. The most important thing is to have fun and stick with it whichever route you take.
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Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby leonard » Sat Jul 27, 2013 1:09 pm

stemikger wrote:
leonard wrote:
stemikger wrote:
leonard wrote:Huh? I have a bunch of guitars and I have yet to have found the easy to play one that people have found on this thread. Not to mention they conquered all the modes of the major scale - as well as the hundred or so other scales that I can find just browsing online. As well as all the variations of the chords. On maybe a 7 or 8 string guitar?

As well as the various picking skills: Finger Picking: Country, classical, Flamanco-style. Flatpicking: Rock, classical, bluegrass, blue, etc. Slide Guitar.

Need to find me one of those easy guitars.


It sounds like you are trying to run before you can walk. First thing is to learn all the major open chords (there are only 7 A to G), don't get hung up on their variations. Buy a song book from a band or artist you really like (i.e., James Taylor or the Beatles). Make sure the fingering chord diagrams are included in the book. From there learn a song a week, month or however long it takes.

As far as all the picking, strumming, etc. That is not something that you really learn, just strum and pick with a pick or your fingers. Have fun. You are not going to become a professional but you certainly can get good enough to break out your guitar and play a song.

Don't worry about learning theory. Just learn the chords of the songs you want to play. You Tube is also a great place to learn.


Totally disagree.

Only by learning some of the theory can you do something like figure out what key a song is in and then figure out all the chord changes. If you don't understand the major scale - then this will be very difficult.

Plus, I am finding that many of those songs we think are just chords "E, A, and B" have color added in the form of scales and unique chord voicings. Only by actually studying and internalizing those versions can you really then pick out what is really going on in songs. Try playing some funk or soul without a ninth chord and you will see what I mean.

Song books and learning through TAB only get you so far. If that's the distance you are looking for, then by all means.

As to picking technique - not something you learn? You have to study and practice IF you want to get proficient with flatpicking techniques (alternate, string skipping, etc), banjo roll (with all fingers - not just thumb and 2 fingers), classical, flamenco, country picking/bends, etc. Self accompaniment - using the thumb to take the bassline. Each of these techniques can be combined and added to your playing in to something completely unique - as you see fit. But, only if one takes the time to learn them. The idea that one is just going to "pick up" the banjo roll or flamenco picking technique simply be playing songs but not practicing technique is misguided.


Hey Man, if you want to make it more difficult go for it. As for me, I am sitting here playing some sweet Jim Croce songs and enjoying every second.

By the way Eddie Van Halen is one of the greatest rock guitar players in the world and does not know how to read music and never had any formal training. Totally self-taught.


Everything I am referencing above is self taught and without reading music. You can still study theory without reading sheet music.

If your approach works, stick with it.
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Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby Torg Fadum » Sat Jul 27, 2013 6:03 pm

gkaplan wrote:
stemikger wrote:
lightheir wrote:Guitar: VERY easy to start up and not sound terrible, but learning curve gets significantly steeper once you start doing things other than the most basic of simple chords.

Piano: Also fairly easy to start and not sound terrible, but difficulty increase a lot with 2-hand technique, and once you start seriously playing without looking at the keys, it's hard and takes alot of practice.

Violin: The hardest (by far) of all three instruments to sound decent on. Prepare to sound terrible for at least a year, if not longer, and you'll be lucky to even get to the point where you can play 'beautiful' music unless you take it very seriously.

Of course, at the higher/highest levels, difficulty is limitless and thus can't be compared amongst the three. However, in terms of ease of startup and to play music that someone else could find enjoyable (and not awful), it's guitar then piano, and then violin in terms of the early learning curve difficulty.


I agree with you, but there is one easier alternative. The ukulele is even easier than the guitar. I have been playing guitar for over 20 years on and off and two years ago I bought a ukulele. I always thought the fingering would be the same as the guitar, but actually that was pretty stupid of me because the ukulele only has 4 strings. After buying a good song book that showed the chord diagrams I could not believe how nice it sounded. After this experience with the uke all I kept thinking was what a great instrument for someone who might be having difficulty learning to play the guitar. I could see someone with no experience playing a song on the Uke in about two weeks and it's so easy to learn other songs once you get one down.

For those who are interested I bought a Fluke Flea ukulele which cost about $175.


Unfortunately, whenever I think of ukeleles and ukulele players, I think of Tiny Tim. It just doesn't seem like a cool instrument. Maybe, I'll try it, though.


Hi, Gordon. Perhaps this might help. Rather than “Tiptoe through the Tulips” with Tiny Tim, try thinking of George Harrison, Paul McCartney, and Joe Brown.

Here’s a link to part of the Concert for George, with Paul nicely introducing and playing a ukulele at the beginning of “Something,” with Eric Clapton, Jeff Lynne, Marc Mann, Ringo, et al. joining in. Cool enough crowd? It includes a short clip of George Harrison’s son Dhani – the spitting image of George -- talking about how much George loved the ukulele: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNKLvQq5bLY.

The Concert for George ended with Joe Brown playing a ukulele and singing “I’ll See You in My Dreams.” It might seem like the ukulele would be an unusual instrument with which to end a tribute to a rock-and-roller, but it was a wonderful – and wonderfully fitting – finale: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lKKwqHrSxdc.

Regards,
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Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby gkaplan » Sat Jul 27, 2013 9:40 pm

Thanks,Torg, for the encouragement. Maybe, I'll give it a go. I'm retiring at the end of the year, and I'm looking forward to broadening my horizons.
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Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby eucalyptus » Sat Jul 27, 2013 10:04 pm

Jamplay, or piano marvel?

;-)
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Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby stemikger » Sun Jul 28, 2013 11:31 am

Torg Fadum wrote:
gkaplan wrote:
stemikger wrote:
lightheir wrote:Guitar: VERY easy to start up and not sound terrible, but learning curve gets significantly steeper once you start doing things other than the most basic of simple chords.

Piano: Also fairly easy to start and not sound terrible, but difficulty increase a lot with 2-hand technique, and once you start seriously playing without looking at the keys, it's hard and takes alot of practice.

Violin: The hardest (by far) of all three instruments to sound decent on. Prepare to sound terrible for at least a year, if not longer, and you'll be lucky to even get to the point where you can play 'beautiful' music unless you take it very seriously.

Of course, at the higher/highest levels, difficulty is limitless and thus can't be compared amongst the three. However, in terms of ease of startup and to play music that someone else could find enjoyable (and not awful), it's guitar then piano, and then violin in terms of the early learning curve difficulty.


I agree with you, but there is one easier alternative. The ukulele is even easier than the guitar. I have been playing guitar for over 20 years on and off and two years ago I bought a ukulele. I always thought the fingering would be the same as the guitar, but actually that was pretty stupid of me because the ukulele only has 4 strings. After buying a good song book that showed the chord diagrams I could not believe how nice it sounded. After this experience with the uke all I kept thinking was what a great instrument for someone who might be having difficulty learning to play the guitar. I could see someone with no experience playing a song on the Uke in about two weeks and it's so easy to learn other songs once you get one down.

For those who are interested I bought a Fluke Flea ukulele which cost about $175.


Unfortunately, whenever I think of ukeleles and ukulele players, I think of Tiny Tim. It just doesn't seem like a cool instrument. Maybe, I'll try it, though.


Hi, Gordon. Perhaps this might help. Rather than “Tiptoe through the Tulips” with Tiny Tim, try thinking of George Harrison, Paul McCartney, and Joe Brown.

Here’s a link to part of the Concert for George, with Paul nicely introducing and playing a ukulele at the beginning of “Something,” with Eric Clapton, Jeff Lynne, Marc Mann, Ringo, et al. joining in. Cool enough crowd? It includes a short clip of George Harrison’s son Dhani – the spitting image of George -- talking about how much George loved the ukulele: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNKLvQq5bLY.

The Concert for George ended with Joe Brown playing a ukulele and singing “I’ll See You in My Dreams.” It might seem like the ukulele would be an unusual instrument with which to end a tribute to a rock-and-roller, but it was a wonderful – and wonderfully fitting – finale: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lKKwqHrSxdc.

Regards,
Torg


Great Links Torg. I did hear this about George. I remember someone saying the Uke was his instrument of choice. He was way ahead of his time.
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Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby Torg Fadum » Mon Jul 29, 2013 9:54 am

Hi Gordon: Congrats on your upcoming retirement!

Hi Stemikger: Glad you enjoyed the links. I bought the DVD of the Concert for George years ago, and it was fantastic.

Regards,
Torg
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Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby JupiterJones » Mon Jul 29, 2013 11:19 am

stemikger wrote:I always thought the fingering would be the same as the guitar, but actually that was pretty stupid of me because the ukulele only has 4 strings.


Not that stupid, actually. A standard-tuned ukulele's strings are tuned using essentially the same relationship as the top 4 strings of a guitar.

In other words, if you took a guitar, pulled off the low E and A strings, stuck a capo on the 5th fret... you'd have a ukulele.*

So the same chord shapes work just fine on a uke. They just give you different chords.**

The open-position D chord shape on a guitar is a G on a uke, the open-position C is an F on the uke (just don't fret the 5th string because there isn't a 5th string!), etc.

A guitarist transitioning to the ukulele will have to learn few, if any, new shapes or finger patterns. They just have to get used to those shapes and patterns only using four strings and making different chords/scales. (Contrast this with, say, mandolin, where it's a whole different ballgame entirely.)



* Technically, you'd have to also raise your 4th string up an octave to give you that characteristic "re-entrant" sound. But it's still the same letter-name either way. Some uke players keep that string low for added range/fullness.

** A chord that's a perfect 4th up, incidentally.
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Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby Fallible » Mon Jul 29, 2013 12:22 pm

gkaplan wrote:Thanks,Torg, for the encouragement. Maybe, I'll give it a go. I'm retiring at the end of the year, and I'm looking forward to broadening my horizons.


You also could go from the four-string uke to a four-string guitar for the guitar sound, but you lose the very special uke sound. If I remember correctly, Nick Reynolds of the Kingston Trio played a four-string, or tenor, guitar. And then, of course, there's the four-string banjo.

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Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby gkaplan » Mon Jul 29, 2013 2:16 pm

As someone who used to like bluegrass, I wouldn't mind learning to play the banjo; however, I've heard it's a difficult instrument to learn.
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Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby riskreward » Mon Jul 29, 2013 9:41 pm

You may drive around in your town
Ina brand new shiny car
Your face in the wind your haircut's in
And your friends think you're bizarre
you may find a cushy job and I hope that you go far
But if you really want to taste some cool success
You better learn to play guitar

CHORUS:

Play guitar--play guitar (3X)

You got your eye on the cheerleader queen
you're walkin' her home from school
You know that she's only seventeen
She's gonna make you a fool
You know you can't touch this stuff
Without money or a brand new car
Let me give you some good advice young man
You better learn to play guitar

CHORUS

All women around the world want a phony rock star
Who plays guitar
You can pump your iron and shine your shoes
And wear your hair just right
You go down out on cruisin' street
'Cause you want to score tonight
Ra da ra da ra da
And you really want to show your scars
Forget all about that macho s...
And learn how to play guitar

From John Mellencamp-Play Guitar
riskreward
 
Posts: 100
Joined: Sat Jan 05, 2008 12:32 pm

Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby leo383 » Tue Jul 30, 2013 10:03 am

Hello everyone, I am the OP.

I chose piano over guitar, and have been pecking away at it for more than a year now. It's hard (I play bass in a gigging band, have three small kids,do freelance bookkeeping, am a PTA board member, etc...) to stay focused and it's easy to let a week slip on by without working at it, but I'm still at it. Maybe average 15 minutes a day, would love a lot more.

I was attracted to the Sudnow Method, which "throws you in the deep end" by making you play complex jazz voicings right off the bat. Fascinating to see the fingers go from "you're not making me do that all at the same time" to "autopilot" in a matter of days sometimes.

Won't give up.
leo383
 
Posts: 452
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2007 10:36 pm
Location: Durham, NC

Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby Fallible » Tue Jul 30, 2013 11:31 am

leo383 wrote:Hello everyone, I am the OP.

I chose piano over guitar, and have been pecking away at it for more than a year now. It's hard (I play bass in a gigging band, have three small kids,do freelance bookkeeping, am a PTA board member, etc...) to stay focused and it's easy to let a week slip on by without working at it, but I'm still at it. Maybe average 15 minutes a day, would love a lot more.

I was attracted to the Sudnow Method, which "throws you in the deep end" by making you play complex jazz voicings right off the bat. Fascinating to see the fingers go from "you're not making me do that all at the same time" to "autopilot" in a matter of days sometimes.

Won't give up.


A true Boglehead stays the course. :thumbsup
"Common sense and a sense of humor are the same thing, moving at different speeds. A sense of humor is just common sense, dancing." -William James
Fallible
 
Posts: 3910
Joined: Fri Nov 27, 2009 5:44 pm

Re: Learn Guitar or Piano?

Postby eucalyptus » Tue Jul 30, 2013 12:30 pm

leo383 wrote:Hello everyone, I am the OP.

I chose piano over guitar, and have been pecking away at it for more than a year now. It's hard (I play bass in a gigging band, have three small kids,do freelance bookkeeping, am a PTA board member, etc...) to stay focused and it's easy to let a week slip on by without working at it, but I'm still at it. Maybe average 15 minutes a day, would love a lot more.

I was attracted to the Sudnow Method, which "throws you in the deep end" by making you play complex jazz voicings right off the bat. Fascinating to see the fingers go from "you're not making me do that all at the same time" to "autopilot" in a matter of days sometimes.

Won't give up.



Sudnow? And miss the opportunity to master "Yankee Doodle Dandy," "Three Little Indians" and other classics?
eucalyptus
 
Posts: 459
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2007 2:24 pm

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