That Frugal Thing You Do

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities

Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Bongleur » Mon Jan 21, 2013 8:24 am

>I sow my socks when they have holes instead of buying new ones

If you sow a black one next to a white one, does it grow :oops: argyle?
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby red5 » Mon Jan 21, 2013 8:33 am

- Use a reel mower and mow myself

- Use rabbit ears (no cable), use trac phone (no landline or smart phone).

- If people aren't wearing sweaters then it is to warm in the house. Seriously, I set the downstairs to 55 to 58 most days and the upstairs to 63 or 64. Warm air rises so I prefer to spend time up there.

- I don't turn the shower all the way up (water pressure), thus there is less water coming out. I think I save water this way and I dont have to turn it as much to the hot side in order to have hot water.

- Vinegar and baking soda are marvelous cleaning agents

- My growing family only knows what a small two door car is like (10 years old). When it goes then we'll get a used 4 door.

- I use cash rewards credit card for everything and pay it off in full.

- A costco membership cost me 55 bucks a year. We go through 3 gallons of milk a week, which saves us at least $1.50 compared to walmart. This alone more than pays for the membership over the course of a year. Add in all the other savings and we save a lot of money. We are very careful only to buy what we need.

- Speaking of Costco, I keep a running excel sheet comparing food prices with Walmart. Since they are close to each other we shop both stores and buy what is cheaper within each store.

- As a note, we bought 10 or 12 boxes of Life when it was on a ridiculous sale. Haven't bought cereal in 3 months.

- Use only cold water in washing machine. Only dry clothes outside.

- Reuse sons sandwhich baggies from school lunch. Either they get cleaned or they get used to pick up dog poo on walks (those ones don't reused!).

- Brownbag all lunches to work. Son brings lunch to school.

- Very rarely buy books. Utilize used book sales (and that is even iffy), mostly use library.

- Try to take our own family portrait instead of hiring professional (which has to be approved by wife :? )

- Wife cuts hair for kids and I.

- Received like 18 free CFL's from power company.

- The road and living room is my gym

- Netflix instead of movie theatre

- When visiting family we make the 18 hour drive in one day rather than 2 days so we save cost of hotel (of course we'd never compromise safety)

- Don't pay more than .28 for an investment. Average is .13.

- Don't use the heat dry setting on dish washer. Instead, open the door and let the dishes sit over night.

- Turn off oven 5 minutes or so before item is finished.

- Never ever buy bottled water.

- Try to only buy used furniture (except couches, mattresses, etc). Sandpaper and stain will do wonders.

- I do spend money, just carefully. I'll take the kids to the local minor league ball game instead of an MLB game. We go to the smaller local zoo instead of the big state zoo.

I'm sure I could put a few more down but I can't think of any more at the moment. I am in part frugal because I want to be and in part because I have to be. I try to focus on experiences rather than materials which I feel benefits the kids much more. I try not to be cheap either (I'll turn up the heat if we have company, for example), but my wife does think I go overboard :happy .
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby VictoriaF » Mon Jan 21, 2013 8:43 am

Bongleur wrote:>I sow my socks when they have holes instead of buying new ones

If you sow a black one next to a white one, does it grow :oops: argyle?


If you sow socks next to wild oats you can then wear them in bed.

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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Fallible » Mon Jan 21, 2013 4:55 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
Bongleur wrote:>I sow my socks when they have holes instead of buying new ones

If you sow a black one next to a white one, does it grow :oops: argyle?


If you sow socks next to wild oats you can then wear them in bed.

Victoria


Y'all should win an award for these one liners - but an award of what? (I probably shouldn't ask...) :D
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby VictoriaF » Mon Jan 21, 2013 7:06 pm

Fallible wrote:
VictoriaF wrote:
Bongleur wrote:>I sow my socks when they have holes instead of buying new ones

If you sow a black one next to a white one, does it grow :oops: argyle?


If you sow socks next to wild oats you can then wear them in bed.

Victoria


Y'all should win an award for these one liners - but an award of what? (I probably shouldn't ask...) :D


An award of socks with holes, of course ;-).

Victoria
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby lightheir » Mon Jan 21, 2013 8:01 pm

red5 wrote:- Use a reel mower and mow myself

- Use rabbit ears (no cable), use trac phone (no landline or smart phone).

- If people aren't wearing sweaters then it is to warm in the house. Seriously, I set the downstairs to 55 to 58 most days and the upstairs to 63 or 64. Warm air rises so I prefer to spend time up there.

- I don't turn the shower all the way up (water pressure), thus there is less water coming out. I think I save water this way and I dont have to turn it as much to the hot side in order to have hot water.

- Vinegar and baking soda are marvelous cleaning agents

- My growing family only knows what a small two door car is like (10 years old). When it goes then we'll get a used 4 door.

- I use cash rewards credit card for everything and pay it off in full.

- A costco membership cost me 55 bucks a year. We go through 3 gallons of milk a week, which saves us at least $1.50 compared to walmart. This alone more than pays for the membership over the course of a year. Add in all the other savings and we save a lot of money. We are very careful only to buy what we need.

- Speaking of Costco, I keep a running excel sheet comparing food prices with Walmart. Since they are close to each other we shop both stores and buy what is cheaper within each store.

- As a note, we bought 10 or 12 boxes of Life when it was on a ridiculous sale. Haven't bought cereal in 3 months.

- Use only cold water in washing machine. Only dry clothes outside.

- Reuse sons sandwhich baggies from school lunch. Either they get cleaned or they get used to pick up dog poo on walks (those ones don't reused!).

- Brownbag all lunches to work. Son brings lunch to school.

- Very rarely buy books. Utilize used book sales (and that is even iffy), mostly use library.

- Try to take our own family portrait instead of hiring professional (which has to be approved by wife :? )

- Wife cuts hair for kids and I.

- Received like 18 free CFL's from power company.

- The road and living room is my gym

- Netflix instead of movie theatre

- When visiting family we make the 18 hour drive in one day rather than 2 days so we save cost of hotel (of course we'd never compromise safety)

- Don't pay more than .28 for an investment. Average is .13.

- Don't use the heat dry setting on dish washer. Instead, open the door and let the dishes sit over night.

- Turn off oven 5 minutes or so before item is finished.

- Never ever buy bottled water.

- Try to only buy used furniture (except couches, mattresses, etc). Sandpaper and stain will do wonders.

- I do spend money, just carefully. I'll take the kids to the local minor league ball game instead of an MLB game. We go to the smaller local zoo instead of the big state zoo.

I'm sure I could put a few more down but I can't think of any more at the moment. I am in part frugal because I want to be and in part because I have to be. I try to focus on experiences rather than materials which I feel benefits the kids much more. I try not to be cheap either (I'll turn up the heat if we have company, for example), but my wife does think I go overboard :happy .


Wow. I'm getting tired just reading and thinking about this!

Drying clothes only outside is pretty serious for frugality!
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Fallible » Mon Jan 21, 2013 9:43 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
Fallible wrote:
VictoriaF wrote:
Bongleur wrote:>I sow my socks when they have holes instead of buying new ones

If you sow a black one next to a white one, does it grow :oops: argyle?


If you sow socks next to wild oats you can then wear them in bed.

Victoria


Y'all should win an award for these one liners - but an award of what? (I probably shouldn't ask...) :D


An award of socks with holes, of course ;-).

Victoria


This being about frugality, just the holes.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby travellight » Tue Jan 22, 2013 12:24 am

red5- I do about half to 2/3 of what you do but you really take it to the limit, man! You really got me with the excel spread sheet comparing walmart to costco prices.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Nicolas » Tue Jan 22, 2013 12:42 am

I roast my own coffee beans that I buy green for between $2.50 to $4.00 a lb., depending on variety. The quality is as good or better than gourmet whole bean coffee that you might buy at Starbucks or elsewhere for $15/lb. and up. I never drink coffee that's over a week old (since roasting). I generally have up to several hundred lbs. of green on hand. As a side benefit I can ride out the periodic Brazilian crop failures. When kept in the green state, coffee beans will last for years without degradation. After roasting, quality begins degrading in about six or seven days.

Most people drink stale coffee, they have no idea how long it's been on the store shelf, it may have been months. They've never tasted fresh-roasted coffee so they remain in ignorance. Remember the first time you tasted just-picked garden tomatoes, and what a revelation that was vs. store or canned? It's like that when you drink coffee that you've roasted yourself. It's a revelation. I never buy roasted coffee anymore, only green.

I roast and drink about a pound a week, and I roast about a pound every two to three weeks of decaf for my wife (yes, you can get green decaf beans), so the savings really add up over time.

In the ten years that I've been doing this I must've saved hundreds (dare I say thousands?) over the price of roasted gourmet coffee.
Last edited by Nicolas on Tue Jan 22, 2013 1:15 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby thomasbayarea » Tue Jan 22, 2013 1:09 am

reggiesimpson wrote:Put 2 inch clear bubble wrap for insulation on the windows. Cheap, quick and efficient.


Where do you buy 2 inch bubble wrap?
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Mrs.Feeley » Tue Jan 22, 2013 2:05 am

Nicolas wrote:I roast my own coffee beans that I buy green for between $2.50 to $4.00 a lb., depending on variety. The quality is as good or better than gourmet whole bean coffee that you might buy at Starbucks or elsewhere for $15/lb. and up. I never drink coffee that's over a week old (since roasting). I generally have up to several hundred lbs. of green on hand. As a side benefit I can ride out the periodic Brazilian crop failures. When kept in the green state, coffee beans will last for years without degradation. After roasting, quality begins degrading in about six or seven days.

Most people drink stale coffee, they have no idea how long it's been on the store shelf, it may have been months. They've never tasted fresh-roasted coffee so they remain in ignorance. Remember the first time you tasted just-picked garden tomatoes, and what a revelation that was vs. store or canned? It's like that when you drink coffee that you've roasted yourself. It's a revelation. I never buy roasted coffee anymore, only green.

I roast and drink about a pound a week, and I roast about a pound every two to three weeks of decaf for my wife (yes, you can get green decaf beans), so the savings really add up over time.

In the ten years that I've been doing this I must've saved hundreds (dare I say thousands?) over the price of roasted gourmet coffee.


What type of roaster do you have?

I've considered doing this for a long time but what little research I've done into roasters has seemed overwhelming and the decent roasters uber-pricey.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby red5 » Tue Jan 22, 2013 6:47 am

travellight wrote:red5- I do about half to 2/3 of what you do but you really take it to the limit, man! You really got me with the excel spread sheet comparing walmart to costco prices.


Well in all fairness I have been lazy with the excel sheet lately. We just got the Costco membership a few months ago and at first we did not know which prices were better. Now we have a good idea of what to buy there and what not to buy there so I think the excel sheet will soon be deleted.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby atfish » Tue Jan 22, 2013 8:35 am

What type of roaster do you have?

I've considered doing this for a long time but what little research I've done into roasters has seemed overwhelming and the decent roasters uber-pricey.[/quote]

Some people use hot air popcorn poppers to roast coffee.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby crowd79 » Tue Jan 22, 2013 10:09 am

Buy greeting cards at your local dollar store for $1 a piece, or even 2/$1 at some stores like Dollar Tree. Spending $3, $4, $5 up to $10 for some of those fancy ones at Hallmark, etc, is totally ridiculous IMO.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Boglenaut » Tue Jan 22, 2013 10:45 am

crowd79 wrote:Buy greeting cards at your local dollar store for $1 a piece, or even 2/$1 at some stores like Dollar Tree. Spending $3, $4, $5 up to $10 for some of those fancy ones at Hallmark, etc, is totally ridiculous IMO.


When my son was 3, he was obsessed with balloons. Those $1 helium ballons at Dollar Tree were great. They were $4.50 elsewhere.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Nicolas » Tue Jan 22, 2013 11:10 am

Mrs.Feeley wrote:
What type of roaster do you have?

I've considered doing this for a long time but what little research I've done into roasters has seemed overwhelming and the decent roasters uber-pricey.


For the first nine years I used hot air popcorn poppers that I bought at Goodwill stores for $2.99 each. When one would conk out, I'd buy another. (They lasted a long time, but once in a while they would wear out). Basically I had almost zero dollars invested in this hobby. I would try to find the Poppery II popper made by WestBend, they were best. But you can only roast about 1/2 cup of green beans at a time, so it would take me five roastings at 5 to 7 minutes each to roast a week's worth. Lately, a friend showed me how to build my own higher-capacity roaster, made from a Stir-Crazy popcorn popper ($25), a spring-form ring ($1 at Goodwill), a bolt, a few nuts, and washers from the hardware store to replace the plastic shaft of the popper (which would melt otherwise), and a $40 convection oven placed on top to supply the heat, total about $70 to $75. With this setup I can roast a week's worth at once. I would not buy one of the ready-made home roasters. They're too expensive and would just break. You can do this for $2.99 and a supply of green beans. Just make sure the popper has air vents in the side of the chamber, not the bottom. You can find demos on youtube.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Sam I Am » Tue Jan 22, 2013 11:38 am

Message deleted.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby bigmarley4 » Tue Jan 22, 2013 3:05 pm

I've stopped buying books altogether. I use the public library ebooks that can be downloaded to Kindle, and when not available I get a physical book from the library. As a voracious reader this has saved me $100's/yr.

For music, I use Spotify premium at $9/month instead of buying MP3's. Another big money saver for me as I love new music and would get 2 or 3 albums a month.

bigM
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Sam I Am » Tue Jan 22, 2013 7:21 pm

Message deleted.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Mrs.Feeley » Wed Jan 23, 2013 12:21 am

Nicolas wrote:
Mrs.Feeley wrote:
What type of roaster do you have?

I've considered doing this for a long time but what little research I've done into roasters has seemed overwhelming and the decent roasters uber-pricey.


For the first nine years I used hot air popcorn poppers that I bought at Goodwill stores for $2.99 each. When one would conk out, I'd buy another. (They lasted a long time, but once in a while they would wear out). Basically I had almost zero dollars invested in this hobby. I would try to find the Poppery II popper made by WestBend, they were best. But you can only roast about 1/2 cup of green beans at a time, so it would take me five roastings at 5 to 7 minutes each to roast a week's worth. Lately, a friend showed me how to build my own higher-capacity roaster, made from a Stir-Crazy popcorn popper ($25), a spring-form ring ($1 at Goodwill), a bolt, a few nuts, and washers from the hardware store to replace the plastic shaft of the popper (which would melt otherwise), and a $40 convection oven placed on top to supply the heat, total about $70 to $75. With this setup I can roast a week's worth at once. I would not buy one of the ready-made home roasters. They're too expensive and would just break. You can do this for $2.99 and a supply of green beans. Just make sure the popper has air vents in the side of the chamber, not the bottom. You can find demos on youtube.


Thanks for the tip about the Stir-Crazy/roaster. I'll give that some thought. We have a Stir-Crazy that's about to be retired as the plastic dome is currently held together by duct tape, and not too well. Although popcorn flying through the house does provide frugal exercise for the dogs. :D

Funny you should mention the Poppery II. We had one. I gave a lot of thought to using it as a roaster but most of what I read on Sweet Maria's and in the old usenet coffee-lovers group seemed to point toward the fact that it would need to be rewired to make it hotter, or else I would 1) waste a lot of coffee beans trying to roast them at low temperature and 2) waste a lot of time trying to find coffee beans that would roast properly at low temps. Since I have an aversion to rewiring appliances especially to make them hotter, I gave it away on Freecycle before I burned down the house and wasted money on lots of green partially-roasted coffee beans. Maybe that was a rash and alarmist thing to do. :D

But I plan to look into the Stir-Crazy-as-roaster. And I thank you for the tip. From the pics I've seen it looks like that would roast a little more efficiently than a hot-air popper.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Teetlebaum » Thu Jan 24, 2013 12:33 am

Body donation. At least that's what my instructions are, but it's always possible that after my demise my admirers will finally appear and insist on displaying my remains in a mausoleum dominating the city square.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby jridger2011 » Thu Jan 24, 2013 12:47 am

Some frugal things:

- commercial quality clothing steamer to steam sweaters and coats, only dry clean when there is a stain or otherwise soiled, or when suits need pressing
- packing lunch, bringing water
- only order 1 drink while having dinner out, unless special occasion
- when something breaks, fix it until cost exceeds 50%-75% of purchase price
- plan meals and food shopping based on weekly specials
- used books and video games
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Nicolas » Wed Feb 13, 2013 11:29 pm

Mrs.Feeley wrote:
Nicolas wrote:
Mrs.Feeley wrote:
What type of roaster do you have?

I've considered doing this for a long time but what little research I've done into roasters has seemed overwhelming and the decent roasters uber-pricey.


For the first nine years I used hot air popcorn poppers that I bought at Goodwill stores for $2.99 each. When one would conk out, I'd buy another. (They lasted a long time, but once in a while they would wear out). Basically I had almost zero dollars invested in this hobby. I would try to find the Poppery II popper made by WestBend, they were best. But you can only roast about 1/2 cup of green beans at a time, so it would take me five roastings at 5 to 7 minutes each to roast a week's worth. Lately, a friend showed me how to build my own higher-capacity roaster, made from a Stir-Crazy popcorn popper ($25), a spring-form ring ($1 at Goodwill), a bolt, a few nuts, and washers from the hardware store to replace the plastic shaft of the popper (which would melt otherwise), and a $40 convection oven placed on top to supply the heat, total about $70 to $75. With this setup I can roast a week's worth at once. I would not buy one of the ready-made home roasters. They're too expensive and would just break. You can do this for $2.99 and a supply of green beans. Just make sure the popper has air vents in the side of the chamber, not the bottom. You can find demos on youtube.


Thanks for the tip about the Stir-Crazy/roaster. I'll give that some thought. We have a Stir-Crazy that's about to be retired as the plastic dome is currently held together by duct tape, and not too well. Although popcorn flying through the house does provide frugal exercise for the dogs. :D

Funny you should mention the Poppery II. We had one. I gave a lot of thought to using it as a roaster but most of what I read on Sweet Maria's and in the old usenet coffee-lovers group seemed to point toward the fact that it would need to be rewired to make it hotter, or else I would 1) waste a lot of coffee beans trying to roast them at low temperature and 2) waste a lot of time trying to find coffee beans that would roast properly at low temps. Since I have an aversion to rewiring appliances especially to make them hotter, I gave it away on Freecycle before I burned down the house and wasted money on lots of green partially-roasted coffee beans. Maybe that was a rash and alarmist thing to do. :D

But I plan to look into the Stir-Crazy-as-roaster. And I thank you for the tip. From the pics I've seen it looks like that would roast a little more efficiently than a hot-air popper.


You don't need to rewire or do anything invasively or otherwise to get a Poppery II to roast nice coffee. Like I said, I used them for nine years and never modified them in any way. What you've been reading are the musings of enthusiastic hobbyists talking about tweaking their machines. In no sense does anyone need to do this to be able to roast nice coffee.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Juniormint » Wed Feb 20, 2013 12:19 am

Saw this posted on slickdeals and plan on giving it a try. If you have the Chase Freedom card with the rotating 5% categories for the months that we have gas as a reward category. You can buy the gas gift cards and get the 5% cash back on that as well. So basically, you buy $200 worth of gift cards, get the 5% cash back and use the gift cards for gas when the categories are different.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby mickeyd » Wed Feb 20, 2013 3:15 pm

So basically, you buy $200 worth of gift cards, get the 5% cash back and use the gift cards for gas when the categories are different.


Let us know how that works out. Almost seems too simple.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby hsv_climber » Wed Feb 20, 2013 3:37 pm

mickeyd wrote:
So basically, you buy $200 worth of gift cards, get the 5% cash back and use the gift cards for gas when the categories are different.


Let us know how that works out. Almost seems to simple.


Chase has and will use the right of closing a credit card for "perk abuse". However, $200 * 0.05 = $10 will be ignored by Chase and won't be worth anyone's time to do it either.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby atfish » Wed Feb 20, 2013 3:44 pm

Buy whole milk and water it down to 2% or 1%, etc. Usually the stores around here charge about the same for whole or 2% milk.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Default User BR » Thu Feb 21, 2013 12:16 pm

atfish wrote:Buy whole milk and water it down to 2% or 1%, etc. Usually the stores around here charge about the same for whole or 2% milk.

2% is not watered-down whole. To get the same fat content, you'd have to mix about 3 quarts of water per gallon. The result would probably not be palatable to most people.


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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Boglenaut » Thu Feb 21, 2013 12:26 pm

Default User BR wrote:
atfish wrote:Buy whole milk and water it down to 2% or 1%, etc. Usually the stores around here charge about the same for whole or 2% milk.

2% is not watered-down whole. To get the same fat content, you'd have to mix about 3 quarts of water per gallon. The result would probably not be palatable to most people.


Brian


I agree it doesn't seem correct. That would imply Fat-Free milk is water.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby mrspremise » Thu Feb 21, 2013 2:54 pm

For me I think it's less about specific things that you do rather than a mindset. Well before the recession, I was always doing occasional cost comparisons and was very active in trying to find the best deals I could on things I wanted. I'm a frequenter of deal forums (though I have to remind myself not to buy things just because they're a "good deal". I check craigslist for all sorts of things first (but I always check to going price of the item). I rarely check out online or go to a restaurant without looking for a coupon first. I do price and quality comparisons for all sizable purchases. I do the cost/oz comparison at the grocery store and try out store brands to see if I can tell a difference. I ask myself "If my husband an I are both ordering a quarter mufaletta, is it better to just order a half, or a whole and have leftovers?" For things that aren't one time purchases, but recurring services, I'm getting much better about "auditing" my expenses from time to time and shopping around than I used to be. Anything that can wait (clothes, electronics, etc) waits until there's a good sale. Things that can't wait as well (food), I still stock up when there are good deals or structure my produce/meat selections around what's on sale.

The interesting thing is because it's a mindset to do a comparison/research, rather than a habit to buy the cheapest thing or not buy things period, is I've found it's adapted to my circumstances better. As I have started to get increasingly more money and a lot less time (18 month old, anyone?), it's relatively easy to factor in a higher time value than I used to. I can allow myself non-frugal choices, but I do it by answering the question "it is worth it to me?" which definitely changes with resources and lifestyle. The trick I find is not always to compare like with like, but opportunity cost. "Yes, this cocktail is much more than if I made it at home. Do I want it as much as I want desert? A movie ticket? An mp3 album?" The answer is normally no, but sometimes the answer is yes.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby VictoriaF » Thu Feb 21, 2013 3:32 pm

Teetlebaum wrote:Body donation.


Before or after?

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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Faith20879 » Thu Feb 21, 2013 3:48 pm

Before or after?
:happy :) :D :D :D
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Riverstwo » Thu Feb 21, 2013 3:56 pm

I buy all my clothes at Goodwill or Salvation Army.
I fish and hunt for food and have a garden
I cook mostly at home
Yard sales
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby reggiesimpson » Thu Feb 21, 2013 4:45 pm

Riverstwo wrote:I buy all my clothes at Goodwill or Salvation Army.
I fish and hunt for food and have a garden
I cook mostly at home
Yard sales

+1 Just bought 2 terrific jackets at the local Thrift Shop. London Fog! Hardly used and very warm $7 and $6 ( and 50% off cuz it was Monday!).
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Fallible » Thu Feb 21, 2013 4:55 pm

reggiesimpson wrote:
Riverstwo wrote:I buy all my clothes at Goodwill or Salvation Army.
I fish and hunt for food and have a garden
I cook mostly at home
Yard sales

+1 Just bought 2 terrific jackets at the local Thrift Shop. London Fog! Hardly used and very warm $7 and $6 ( and 50% off cuz it was Monday!).


Those are definitely terrific buys, but I can top them. I still wear a London Fog trench coat and a jacket bought in the late '80s. Still in style (though if they weren't I'd still wear them). Only problem is I've gained weight since I bought them and can't wear heavy clothing like sweaters under them. Of course I could just lose weight...
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Random Poster » Thu Feb 21, 2013 6:09 pm

reggiesimpson wrote:+1 Just bought 2 terrific jackets at the local Thrift Shop. London Fog! Hardly used and very warm $7 and $6 ( and 50% off cuz it was Monday!).


I wonder if the 50% on Monday promotion was a nationwide event? The Goodwill that I visted in Montana on President's Day was running a 50% sale as well.

Never before in my life have I waited in line for a Goodwill store to open, and never before in my life have I seen a line about 25 people deep waiting for a Goodwill store to open.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby interplanetjanet » Thu Feb 21, 2013 6:47 pm

I have a beautiful red full length wool coat that was in almost new condition I picked up at a thrift some years ago - they were running various promotions ("everything red on Tuesdays is 70% off") and I ended up getting it for $4. I still think it was the best clothing bargain of my life.

I love thrift stores, they're like a treasure hunt. A good portion of my work wardrobe was assembled from them over the years, some clothes with the tags still on.

One thing that shopping at thrifts really helped me with was understanding how clothing can safely be laundered, considering only the method of construction and the materials (and not the "care" tag). I'm not a big believer in dry cleaning for most things, but a "dry clean only" tag no longer scares me off. I've had success with careful conventional laundering of about 90% of the "dry clean" articles of clothing I've found over the years, and the few blouses that were ruined I only paid $3-4/ea for. I can live with that.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby reggiesimpson » Thu Feb 21, 2013 7:00 pm

Funny occurance at our local thrift store recently. I was looking through the clothing and came across a terrific looking green sweater. I said to myself i could use a good looking green sweater so i put it up against my chest a saw that it was a smidge to small.........rats! I then took notice of the emblem on the front and it looked familiar? Yup, it was the same sweater i had donated months ago!
I put it back on the rack.
Last edited by reggiesimpson on Thu Feb 21, 2013 7:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Jordana » Thu Feb 21, 2013 7:00 pm

As to inexpensive greeting cards, my mother gave my sister and I a box of nice quality greeting cards for different occasions, a few years ago from Costco. The cards looked "unique" and "upscale". My brother and sister-in-law just had a baby and went the family went over, my sister-in-law said that I and my sister had given gifts with the same card. She said the card was nice but she wondered how we had found the same card. Everyone said..."Oh the box of cards from Costco." So much for appearing original, unique or upscale.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Sam I Am » Thu Feb 21, 2013 7:23 pm

Message deleted.
Last edited by Sam I Am on Sun Oct 06, 2013 3:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Sam I Am » Thu Feb 21, 2013 7:27 pm

Message deleted.
Last edited by Sam I Am on Sun Oct 06, 2013 3:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Stevee » Thu Feb 21, 2013 9:35 pm

Coffeemaking- I inherited a Keurig machine. I love it, but those K-cups are rather expensive (I'd guess roughly $0.75 each).
I could buy a reusable K-strainer (permanent K-cup) but why bother? I simply remove the used coffee from a used K-cup, fill it with any ground coffee lying around, cover with foil and voila - recycled K-cup ready for duty! :happy
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Olds33 » Thu Feb 21, 2013 9:44 pm

I continue to drive my 1989 Buick Century which I bought used in 1999. And this is all in Minnesota where the winters are not gentle on cars.
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What's your favorite frugal thing(s) to do?

Postby gvsucavie03 » Sat Feb 23, 2013 6:03 pm

I've read a couple of older threads from years back and thought it would be fun to pose this question again... what are some of the frugal things you do?

1. Shop at Goodwill - GREAT bargains in a college town; sometimes new name-brand items for super cheap! :greedy
2. Use a cash envelope system for groceries, gas, entertainment and clothes
3. Collect spare change to use for birthday parties/gifts
4. Drive under 65mph on highways to save gas
5. Use a discount card purchased at a hockey fundraiser - lots of 10-25% off deals!
6. Purchase double-minute Tracfone cards instead of monthly cell phone contract
7. Brownbag, sometimes for dinner, too if I'm working late
8. Coupon, coupon, coupon
9. bought a '99 explorer with 210k miles that runs fine
10. Read library books instead of buying them
11. Avoid eating out
12. Read my neighbor's magazine issues after he's done with them
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Re: What's your favorite frugal thing(s) to do?

Postby reggiesimpson » Sat Feb 23, 2013 6:19 pm

Lower the thermostat.
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Re: What's your favorite frugal thing(s) to do?

Postby gvsucavie03 » Sat Feb 23, 2013 6:31 pm

reggiesimpson wrote:Lower the thermostat.


Where's the blankets??:happy
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Re: What's your favorite frugal thing(s) to do?

Postby cheese_breath » Sat Feb 23, 2013 6:42 pm

3a... Throw spare change in a big coffee can and deposit in my savings account when the can gets full. Feels like new money.
The surest way to know the future is when it's the past.
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Re: What's your favorite frugal thing(s) to do?

Postby Stonebr » Sat Feb 23, 2013 6:53 pm

gvsucavie03 wrote:
reggiesimpson wrote:Lower the thermostat.


Where's the blankets??:happy


and your honey...? :D
"have more than thou showest, | speak less than thou knowest" -- The Fool in King Lear
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Re: What's your favorite frugal thing(s) to do?

Postby reggiesimpson » Sat Feb 23, 2013 7:23 pm

Stonebr wrote:
gvsucavie03 wrote:
reggiesimpson wrote:Lower the thermostat.


Where's the blankets??:happy


and your honey...? :D

Sweaters.
Looks like lots of BH live in colder climates!
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Re: What's your favorite frugal thing(s) to do?

Postby chaz » Sat Feb 23, 2013 7:26 pm

Read library books.
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