That Frugal Thing You Do

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities

Postby 4strings » Thu Jan 20, 2011 1:32 pm

bump...best thread ever, giving me tons of ideas to change my habits
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Postby pkh01l » Thu Jan 20, 2011 2:02 pm

I pack/cook my own lunch four days per week and allow myself to splurge and go out with work associates one day per week.

I tend to look for ways how to make those four lunches as cheaply as possible. My lowest cost option is $1.50 for all four days or $0.37.5 cents per day!

I buy a bag of dried pinto beans (9 servings in all) for $0.99 and one large onion for $.50.

Boil the beans for a couple hours, add in the onion close to when they are done (season to taste) and it makes four nice size bowls of beans that have lots of fiber and a fair amount of protein.
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Postby pkh01l » Thu Jan 20, 2011 4:11 pm

Dumping cable is a very popular choice but for me personally, I have found having a nice or premium cable selection with dvr, is actually a cost saver. I love to watch tv of all sorts, including sports. When I had the basic package and nothing was on that I liked or my package couldn't get the game I wanted, I ended up going out the sports bar and doing something else for entertainment that cost money.

Having the nice package with dvr, pretty much ensures I ALWAYS have something at home to watch that I want to see. I thus spend much more time at home and less money overall.
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Postby mickeyd » Fri Jan 21, 2011 6:58 pm

This isn't for everyone, but I make use of the fitness center at a nearby military base 5X a week. Cost $0. While I'm on the base at noontime I chow down at the dining facility for about $4. Complete workout, shower, sauna, towel service and full course meal~ all for $4 and about $1 in gas.
Part-Owner of Texas | | “The CMH-the Cost Matters Hypothesis -is all that is needed to explain why indexing must and will work… Yes, it is that simple.” John C. Bogle
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Postby amdmaxx » Fri Jan 21, 2011 9:22 pm

- 2 BPA free 1L bottles - drink all day at work and take home for the tea/drinking
- Cut the cable.. Get NetFlix and steam all day (need high speed internet).
- Cut landline, use Vonage or cell phone
- Bring own lunch to work ($1 Campbell or Progresso low sodium soups on sale do fine, alternate with sandwiches/fruits/veggies). Yogurt or cereal with milk for breakfast (buy @ supermarket)
- I bought a bally total fitness lifetime membership card off ebay, now paying $3/month for life (never going up)..
- Use Gym facilities to take showers/shave...
- Use high efficientcy everything (windows/boilers/heaters/laundry washer/drier/etc).
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Postby NateW » Sun Jan 23, 2011 8:23 am

I fix our cars, perform home maintenance, and reapir other things, as needed. I save a ton of money, get excercise, and enjoy doing it. The key to success is you have to like doing this.

--Nate
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Postby Sam I Am » Sun Jan 23, 2011 1:26 pm

Message deleted.
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Postby 4strings » Fri Feb 18, 2011 7:33 am

does anyone else shine their own shoes for work?

i actually enjoy some quiet time to take out all my tools, waxesm brushes and cleaning my own work shoes once a week.
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Postby dsmil » Fri Feb 18, 2011 11:25 am

I buy whatever I can on ebay, especially things that I know that I'll constantly use, such as shaving razors and printer ink. Also, any kind of electronic accessory is usually made in the Far East and sold cheaply on ebay. I also bought some barely used golf clubs for 80% off the normal selling price.
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Postby manuvns » Fri Feb 18, 2011 11:36 am

amdmaxx wrote:- Use Gym facilities to take showers/shave...


how much can you save doing this ? i generally go to gym only for workout .
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Postby teacher » Fri Feb 18, 2011 1:14 pm

Taylor wrote:

This is a post I made 6-years ago. I titled it: "The $237,329.00 Car."

Quote:
"Link to www.edmond.com and you will find that a 2003 Honda 4-door Civic has a 5-year true Cost-To-Own (CTO) of $22,725. A 2003 4-door SUV Explorer has a 5-year CTO of $46,934. The difference is $24,209 or $4,802/year.

If you invest your annual $4,802 savings at 8%, in 25 years you will have an additional $237,329.00 for your retirement."


Thanks for sharing this again. I have searched for this post high and low and could never find it. I want to share it with my two sons. I'm so glad to have it.
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Postby frugalhen » Fri Feb 18, 2011 1:28 pm

* buy in bulk at costco or sams club for basic needs (paper/razors) and if you buy food there, buy in bulk and vacuum freeze meats. (make sure you have room to store (I have an extra freezer and it is great).

* bag lunch to work, it will save a lot and you will eat healthier.

* change your own oil/ check air pressure on tires

* better insulate your home

* use cold water for laundry other than whites

* negotiate your cable bill

* Buy almost everything used from ebay or new on Amazon. Amazon i amazing with prices on many items.
"get out and live, you are dead an awfully long time" - Jimmy Demaret
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Postby frugalhen » Fri Feb 18, 2011 1:34 pm

oh, and being in the car business a while, NEVER buy a new car. Unless you are ridiculously wealthy and like the new leather smell that will last two weeks.
"get out and live, you are dead an awfully long time" - Jimmy Demaret
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The $237,329.00 Car we didn't buy.

Postby Taylor Larimore » Sun Feb 20, 2011 2:51 pm

Hi Teacher:

Thanks for sharing this again. I have searched for this post high and low and could never find it. I want to share it with my two sons. I'm so glad to have it.


I am glad you liked that post. It is one of my favorites because it carries such an easy to understand and important message.

This morning we returned from a delightful 7-day vacation aboard the Allure of the Seas (the world's largest cruise ship). Once again we are very glad we bought modest automobiles when we were younger.
"Simplicity is the master key to financial success." -- Jack Bogle
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Postby bvp » Mon Feb 21, 2011 9:59 am

frugalhen wrote:oh, and being in the car business a while, NEVER buy a new car. Unless you are ridiculously wealthy and like the new leather smell that will last two weeks.


What if you buy new and keep the car for 10+ years? I am often confused by this "never buy new" attitude. What's wrong with having the new warranty as well as a car that has not been used?

If there is logic to buying used, I'll gladly listen. My current setup is to buy a new car, drive for 8-12 years, trade in what's left of the car I'm driving, and buy new again. Is there a better method?
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Postby frugalhen » Mon Feb 21, 2011 10:06 am

bvp wrote:
frugalhen wrote:oh, and being in the car business a while, NEVER buy a new car. Unless you are ridiculously wealthy and like the new leather smell that will last two weeks.


What if you buy new and keep the car for 10+ years? I am often confused by this "never buy new" attitude. What's wrong with having the new warranty as well as a car that has not been used?

If there is logic to buying used, I'll gladly listen. My current setup is to buy a new car, drive for 8-12 years, trade in what's left of the car I'm driving, and buy new again. Is there a better method?


If you really keep the car that long, then no, there really is little difference. As long as you can mentally get by the fact the car depreciates in value 12-15 % as you roll it off the dealers lot. :wink:
"get out and live, you are dead an awfully long time" - Jimmy Demaret
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Postby bvp » Mon Feb 21, 2011 10:07 am

frugalhen wrote:
bvp wrote:
frugalhen wrote:oh, and being in the car business a while, NEVER buy a new car. Unless you are ridiculously wealthy and like the new leather smell that will last two weeks.


What if you buy new and keep the car for 10+ years? I am often confused by this "never buy new" attitude. What's wrong with having the new warranty as well as a car that has not been used?

If there is logic to buying used, I'll gladly listen. My current setup is to buy a new car, drive for 8-12 years, trade in what's left of the car I'm driving, and buy new again. Is there a better method?


If you really keep the car that long, then no, there really is little difference. As long as you can mentally get by the fact the car depreciates in value 12-15 % as you roll it off the dealers lot. :wink:


That's understood. If I can find a 1 year used car that doesn't have some ridiculous mileage on it, I'd probably eat that up. I'm guessing that's the optimal configuration? As long as you can get a good warranty on that...
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Postby og15F1 » Tue Feb 22, 2011 9:39 am

*Single (paid off) car shared with my wife
*Shaved my own head for the past 5 years
*No cable TV - Netflix only and internet for news
*No landline telephone - mobile phone only
*Wash clothes with cold water
*Brew coffee at home
*Inherit kids toys and clothes from inlaws who have already been there and bought that
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Postby muddyglass » Tue Feb 22, 2011 6:05 pm

awesome thread! here are some of the things i do to save money:

1. cut my own hair
2. make 7 copies of the same lunch in one cooking session on sundays then store them in the refrigerator for the upcoming week
3. drink filtered water from a stainless steel bottle
4. buy used cds, dvds and books
5. buy clothing in bulk when they are on sale and just essentially wear the same outfit every day
6. use public transportation and/or walk
7. use pre-tax dollars to pay for bus/subway fares
8. shop for grocery items on amazon to take advantage of their subscribe and save 15% extra discount plus free shipping, saving time and money
9. turn off the lights when i'm not in a room
10. re-use plastic grocery bags as garbage bags
11. save unused napkins from restaurants/cafeterias for future use
12. use a stainless steel "hobo tool" (swiss army fork/knife/spoon) on the go instead of disposable plastic utensils
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Postby interplanetjanet » Wed Feb 23, 2011 12:13 am

Sam I Am wrote:
NateW wrote:I fix our cars, perform home maintenance, and reapir other things, as needed. I save a ton of money, get excercise, and enjoy doing it. The key to success is you have to like doing this.

--Nate


Along with liking to do this, I'd say another key is knowing how to do this!

You don't save anything if you have to get a pro to fix what you have attempted, and made worse. :D

Fortunately, I've always accepted my limitations, and rarely got into too deep trouble.

Sam I Am


I've always believed that you don't know what you can't do until you try it...so I try a lot of things. Like Nate, I repair my own cars, do most house repairs (it's amazing what knowing how to pour cement, build a wood frame, and plaster lets you do) and generally try to fix and reuse rather than buy new.

I think it's more of a mindset than a skillset, for me. My tolerance for frustration seems to be really high and I'm happy to spend days teasing apart a problem into pieces that need to be solved individually. My ex would be driven to wits' end after 10 minutes of abstract brainstorming that didn't culminate in an action plan. To each their own!

-Janet
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Postby Boglenaut » Fri May 20, 2011 11:53 am

I am not sure if anyone said this before, but it just came to me... I use free software whenever possible... Open Office, Thunderbird, AVG, etc.

Is there a way to search just one thread?
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Postby SGM » Fri May 20, 2011 7:18 pm

A friend did not paint his house (it was a tear down), used no hot water, bicycled to work, did not shave, dove for golf balls in the shallows.... all in pursuit of early retirement and the purchase of farm. He was successful. He had no spouse or children to deal with.

My wife and I once bought old county govt cars at auction. Now we buy mostly new and keep the cars until they are too beat up to use anymore. A lot of our furniture has been bought at auction or at consignment shops.
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Postby Boglenaut » Fri May 20, 2011 7:36 pm

SGM wrote:A friend did not paint his house (it was a tear down), used no hot water, bicycled to work, did not shave, dove for golf balls in the shallows.... all in pursuit of early retirement and the purchase of farm. He was successful. He had no spouse or children to deal with.


I know why he had no wife or children. :)
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Postby SGM » Fri May 20, 2011 7:47 pm

No kidding, but he seemed happy.
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Postby gofigure » Sat May 21, 2011 5:54 am

Utilize the gym at work and take long walks on the weekends with the Mrs.
Brown bag my lunch and snacks.
Use an antenna instead of cable TV.
Use Vonage to leverage my broadband and to eliminate long distance charges (the Mrs. calls Sweden 2x per week)
Burn wood in winter to supplement heating and use a programmable thermostat.
We turn off the lights.
We both own/drive fuel efficient cars. (I do own a third vehicle though, a small pickup truck which isn't so fuel effecient..)
Repair stuff (clothing, household appliances, tools etc..) instead of throwing them out.
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That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Mr Grumpy » Sat May 21, 2011 7:14 am

Nothing special - always brown bagged it all my life, but sometimes it's what you don't do (or spend). My neighbor pays a guy $10.00 a week to come and pick up the dog "treasures" on his lawn, then pays someone else to mow the lawn. Good for him, but whenever I see the picker or mower guy, I feel like I've saved money by doing it myself.
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Postby kingsnake » Sat May 21, 2011 8:39 am

bring decent sandwiches and decent snacks with me on the airplane/airport...
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Postby entropy71 » Sat May 21, 2011 8:09 pm

I have to admit, I'm impressed.

I hail from the opposite end of the spectrum I suppose -- eat out waaaay too much at nice restaurants, buy an expensive new car every couple of years, spend a decent amount on my wardrobe, financially support my ex-wife and have never even considered cutting my own hair. I hope that this makes you all feel even better now. :oops:

My father taught me that in order to save millions you had to make millions and my whole professional life has been predicated on that philosophy. I'm glad that I found this website and only hope that it wasn't too late. You all are a great influence on me. Thank you!
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Postby rustymutt » Sat May 21, 2011 8:33 pm

I do all the repairs around the house. I wired my own internet and routers.
I mow my own yard and do all the yard feedings, grubs, snow removal. I clean the widows outside. I wash my own car & truck. We clean our own home and cook most day meals. I grill a lot in summer to help reduce the amount of energy we use. We have a set back thermostat. I do my own computer repairs, and taxes. I'm my own bookkeeper. I've rebuilt 2 of the 3 toilets in this house myself. I've put in title flooring in the bathrooms, and Wilson Art fake wood floor in the dinning room. I remodeled my own kitchen. I redid my own redwood deck with semi transparent sealer.
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Postby Boglenaut » Sat May 21, 2011 9:02 pm

entropy71 wrote:
My father taught me that in order to save millions you had to make millions and my whole professional life has been predicated on that philosophy. I'm glad that I found this website and only hope that it wasn't too late. You all are a great influence on me. Thank you!


I think sometimes we all get surrounded by spendthrift neighbors, family or co-workers. I find this site keeps me grounded with a larger perspective. It's an equation...you correctly get the input side. But the output side needs to balance.
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Postby hsv_climber » Sat May 21, 2011 9:06 pm

Here is the advice for a family with small (3-10year old) kids who like to travel:

- buy annual membership to your local Science Center (it costs ~$60-$80). It gives you ASTC membership, which allows you to enter 300 museums in the world for free. Average price to visit a museum - $40 for a family of 4.
Visit ASTC website for the list of museums.

We've saved more than $300-$400+ last year with ASTC membership.
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Postby Boglenaut » Mon May 23, 2011 10:25 am

jenny345 wrote:Buy bulk movie tickets in advance at Costco.


We've been thinking about joining Costco. But so far have not figured out if that will save us money or cost us money because of the larger volumes and tendency to buy more. If we do it, it might go in this "Frugal" thread, or in Cinghail's "Extravegant" thread? :wink:
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Postby Andrew1234 » Mon May 23, 2011 12:33 pm

I religiously avoid middlemen in any area that I understand...realtors, stock brokers, travel agents, insurance agents. Besides, I like learning. The intellectual barriers-to-entry for those occupations is low - and their interests are rarely aligned with your interests.
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Postby Andrew1234 » Mon May 23, 2011 1:59 pm

"Nearly half of Americans say that they definitely or probably couldn’t come up with $2,000 in 30 days, according to new research, raising concerns about the financial fragility of many households."
http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2011/05/ ... y-fragile/

Pretty amazing, isn't it?
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Postby interplanetjanet » Mon May 23, 2011 2:15 pm

jenny345 wrote:According to Consumer Checkbook, in our area the prices at Costco and Sam's Club are 33% - 38% cheaper than retail grocery stores. Unless you are growing your own vegetables and slaughtering pigs in the backyard it is pretty hard not to save money on groceries at the warehouse stores.

Like a lot of people, my perception of Costco for a long time had been linked with five gallon tubs of mayonnaise and the like. One opened up within 20 minutes of my house about two years ago, and I decided to check it out.

I was surprised at what I found. True, there were a lot of packaged goods sold in bulk, but there were also extremely high quality products sold at a good price. Their balsamic vinegars are better than any others I have found at five times the price. Their beef and lamb are exceptional and also a terrific bargain. With most stores I tend to be more critical of house brands than of well known brands, while with Costco I don't think twice about buying things under their "Kirkland" brand - they're often of superior quality.

My experience with their produce has been hit or miss, but I live in the middle of one of the most productive agricultural regions on the planet and we have fruit and vegetable roadside stands everywhere, so it's not a big loss.

Having a chest freezer helps a lot.

-Janet
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Postby gkaplan » Mon May 23, 2011 2:29 pm

I'm single and live in a one-bedroom apartment, so Costco really is not an option.
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Postby VictoriaF » Mon May 23, 2011 5:26 pm

gkaplan wrote:I'm single and live in a one-bedroom apartment, so Costco really is not an option.

The frugal thing you do is being single and living in a one-bedroom apartment.

Victoria
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Postby hsv_climber » Mon May 23, 2011 5:32 pm

jenny345 wrote: Between us and our kids we save about $350 a year just on the movie tickets.


We save much more than that by not going to the movie theaters.
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Postby TenS2XS » Mon May 23, 2011 9:59 pm

Quite a few things I do qualitfy, I think. But I'll mention our cars. I buy something just above basic transporation. Take good care of it and drive it for 10-15 years. I'm not a youngster and I'm currently driving the 4th car I've ever owned. Many more years without a monthly payment than I've had with one. What would have been the opportunity cost of down payments, increased insurance, etc. plus the avoided monthly payments and interest, are used to save and invest. I anticipate nothing but cash purchases from here on out...every 10-15 years.
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Postby RebusCannébus » Mon May 23, 2011 10:31 pm

Puakinekine wrote:
You work from home, but go out for lunch???

This is the only sane way to go for a change of scene, which is crucial for sanity when working from home in my humble opinion. Also Boglenaut might be having business lunches. :)


+1. If I stayed home on weekends after working there all week, I'd go crazy. So I have to get in the car on weekends and drive 12 miles into town to "run errands." A trivial downside to an otherwise frugal lifestyle. Plus few healthcare plans cover madness. OTOH, the wife, who works in town, is perfectly happy to stay home and putter around.
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Re:

Postby Boglenaut » Sun Mar 18, 2012 2:54 pm

Go Blue 99 wrote:Rent movies via Netflix, Blockbuster Online, or RedBox instead of going to a theater.


We get DVD's from the library. They let you have 50 and you can order them on-line if not at your local branch.

We cut cable TV. We don't watch ESPN, so why pay for it.

We negotiate a discount with the cable TV company every year for internet/phone.

For many people, Ooma saves phone costs (but alas, we tried it but had technical preoblems).

We stream Hulu and other sources.

Over the Air TV gives us 8 PBS channels! OTA is not the same as pre-digital days.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby flowerbuyer » Sun Mar 18, 2012 4:55 pm

When we go out to dinner, we eat only half, and bring the rest home for the next day....even in the nicer restaurants. And in most cases, our drink of choice is water. Sometimes a glass of wine, but never soft drinks.
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Re:

Postby nvboglehead » Sun Mar 18, 2012 5:35 pm

pkh01l wrote:Dumping cable is a very popular choice but for me personally, I have found having a nice or premium cable selection with dvr, is actually a cost saver. I love to watch tv of all sorts, including sports. When I had the basic package and nothing was on that I liked or my package couldn't get the game I wanted, I ended up going out the sports bar and doing something else for entertainment that cost money.

Having the nice package with dvr, pretty much ensures I ALWAYS have something at home to watch that I want to see. I thus spend much more time at home and less money overall.


I totally agree that cable/satellite can well be worth the cost. I always call for discounts after the initial, low cost, subscription period elapses. This gets me a $10 to $20 discount. And I compare one provider to switching to the competitor, after the contract has timed out. I just switched from Directv to Dish. Directv would have given me a new, competitive contract but Dish gave us the new two-room DVR for the same price.

For those of you who resent paying the cost of ESPN as much as I do, the pay t.v. folks are slowly and grudgingly coming out with packages that exclude this and pass on some of the savings:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/16/business/media/for-pay-tv-clients-a-steady-diet-of-sports.html?_r=2&ref=business&pagewanted=all

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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby surfinagin » Mon Mar 19, 2012 11:16 am

-If you buy a house, don't buy more than you need. (ie: Do you really need a large formal dining room that's only used twice a year, or 3 baths, or huge BR's?) We raised two children in a small, "starter size" home. We did this by utilizing space wisely, and it worked out fine. We bunked the kids in one BR, and I think they are closer today thanks to that rather than being able to isolate themselves in their own BR's.
Another big benefit of a smaller home: Now, unlike many other empty-nesters, we don't have a big home to sell and downsize back to a "starter-size" home! This is a big savings in cost and convenience, as well as the savings over the years from lower utilities/tax/upkeep on a smaller home.
-"10 year rule" on cars -keep them at least that long.
-Because the car will be worth <$500 when sold, don't pay the large cost to fix minor collision damage that will be irrelevant by then. My wife had one car that I think she managed to dent every piece of sheet metal on (no other cars involved). Just minor damage, but would have cost many thousands to fix all those dings and if every incident was reported we wouldn't still have good insurance rates.
-I love performance cars, but since a young man have forced myself to drive econoboxes. Cars eat up more income than many people realize. It's a personal decision, but always buying only the car you need instead of the slick car you want is one of the easiest and best ways to save and be frugal.
-I've cut my own hair (buzz short) for >30 years, and had done oil changes on two cars nearly as long before retiring from that a few yrs ago. Over time, that's a lot of savings.
-Use coupons at the grocery store. The Sunday paper pays for itself, and lots more.
-Shop the sales at stores that sell at bargain prices, not the stores that sell a "name".
-Never hire anyone to do something you can figure out and do yourself, or have resources/help to get done. This especially applies to home remodeling/renovation. Within the first 10yr in our home, I redid our kitchen, two baths, family room, landscaping, and added a large screened-in porch at a small fraction of what contractors would cost. Don't underestimate what you can do yourself with some good research, planning, and resourcefulness. If not experienced, find family or friends who are handy and offer to help them with their own projects. You will learn, and then also normally get help with your own.
-A great family vacation does not have to be expensive. Camping, hiking, canoeing are inexpensive and great ways to bond and enjoy memorable times with your children. I'm not a fan of DisneyWorld-type vacations, but to each their own.
-Be an engaged parent: beginning with preschool, always impress upon your children the importance of education and doing their best. The benefit it two-fold: you raise the potential that your children will be happy and successful, and also raise the potential that if college-bound they will receive college scholarships that can greatly reduce that financial burden. Even without scholarship savings, doing your best to prepare/ensure your children graduate and enter good careers is one of the most frugal things you can do. Teaching them to stand on their own two feet lowers the possibility that they will seek/need financial assistance from you when they should no longer require it.
Better stop here -think I could go on and on...
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby minniecat » Mon Mar 19, 2012 12:05 pm

One of the best frugal things my husband and I do is shop for clothes at thrift stores. We live near a wealthy neighborhood and there are lots of good thrift stores and consignment shops where we consistently find high end clothing for literally pennies. One of my best buys recently was a Hobo brand leather clutch for 50 cents!! Besides clothes, I get dishwares, books, and cds. Also, browsing the thrift stores satisfies my shopping yearnings and if I end up buying something I don't really really need, I haven't blown the budget.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Boglenaut » Mon Mar 19, 2012 2:36 pm

surfinagin wrote:-If you buy a house, don't buy more than you need. (ie: Do you really need a large formal dining room that's only used twice a year, or 3 baths, or huge BR's?) We raised two children in a small, "starter size" home. We did this by utilizing space wisely, and it worked out fine. We bunked the kids in one BR, and I think they are closer today thanks to that rather than being able to isolate themselves in their own BR's.


That's good advice. We bought an extra bedroom to use as my home office.

The funny thing is, now that laptops are so efficient and wireless, I don't need the office anymore. I can work anywhere now.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby MP173 » Mon Mar 19, 2012 2:51 pm

Just started washing/ironing my shirts rather than to the cleaners. Not quite as good as the pros, but save a few $$$$ a week.

Also, with more casual attire, it is not necessary to always wear a starched shirt.

Ed
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Never iron shirts again.

Postby Taylor Larimore » Mon Mar 19, 2012 3:16 pm

MP173 wrote:Just started washing/ironing my shirts rather than to the cleaners. Not quite as good as the pros, but save a few $$$$ a week.

Also, with more casual attire, it is not necessary to always wear a starched shirt.


Ed:

In the 50s, there were very few home washers. Laundry was picked up weekly by trucks which went around the neighborhood with the ice and milk trucks. At the Miami Laundry, where my dad was manager, I learned the business pushing dirty clothes into large steam washing machines. In the summer (there was no air-conditioning) it was hot, dirty work. We had a motto in the diaper department: "We'll put our hands into anything for a dollar." :happy

I attended The American Institute of Laundry and Dry Cleaning and later became manager of the Superior Laundry in S. Bend, Indiana with 130 employees. I have not had my shirts ironed for many, many years.

There is no need to iron shirts anymore. Buy good quality no-iron shirts; wash in an uncrowded washing machine with the last rinse in cold water.

Use a mid- to low-heat setting in the dryer. Remove immediately before or soon after dry and put on a hanger.

Best wishes.
Taylor
"Simplicity is the master key to financial success." -- Jack Bogle
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby Curlyq » Mon Mar 19, 2012 3:29 pm

.....
Last edited by Curlyq on Tue Apr 10, 2012 9:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby cheesepep » Mon Mar 19, 2012 9:13 pm

If buying meat that comes prepackaged and sold by the pound, I would buy the cheapest package (i.e., the one that weighs the least if all else is equal).

I take the bus here instead of taxis (taxis here are cheap since I'm living overseas).

I try not to buy that $0.99 cent application, but have no qualms buying myself a 32 GB iPad 3rd generation. :oops:
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