That Frugal Thing You Do

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities

Postby VictoriaF » Sat Aug 29, 2009 7:48 am

I track my expenses.

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Postby Bharat » Sat Aug 29, 2009 8:02 am

Sunny wrote:
In thr third world, having a kid is like buying an annuity for retirement income. "Looking after your parents" is passed on proudly as a family value.


It is true and i think it is a good family value. But it is slowly changing due to migration of younger generation to bigger cities or to other countries.

I think this practice exist in America as well,albeit in a limited fashion.
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Postby Fbone » Sat Aug 29, 2009 2:05 pm

Started using Fidelity's credit card for 2% cash rebate.
Fluorescent bulbs.
Re-use canvas grocery bags for 5c discount.
Lowered internet speed.
Utilize library.
Wash clothes in warm water instead of hot.
Shop sales and use coupons. Plan meals weekly.
Read online news.
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Postby mickeyd » Sat Aug 29, 2009 2:05 pm

CodeMaster wrote:I buy books from Borders and make sure I read it before the 30 day return limit then I return it.


Doesn't your town have a public library? Your practice, while clever, seems unethical to me.
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Postby Sidney » Sat Aug 29, 2009 2:19 pm

mickeyd wrote:
CodeMaster wrote:I buy books from Borders and make sure I read it before the 30 day return limit then I return it.


Doesn't your town have a public library? Your practice, while clever, seems unethical to me.


Seems unethical to me, too.
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Postby retiredjg » Sat Aug 29, 2009 2:23 pm

Maybe it was a joke?
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Postby Sidney » Sat Aug 29, 2009 2:31 pm

retiredjg wrote:Maybe it was a joke?


Might be -- but years ago my wife knew young women who would buy a high end dress in a shop, wear it to an event, get it cleaned (mainly to get it pressed) and then return it to the shop. Some people just have a strange idea about right and wrong.
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Postby stevewolfe » Sat Aug 29, 2009 3:24 pm

Let's see:

1) Use credit card cash back to buy gift cards for Christmas presents. This bothers some people for some reason - the cards spend all the same.
2) Wear my clothes till they have holes all over them - particularly around the house.
3) Check coins for 1964 and earlier junk silver
4) Always, always take the phone that comes free with the plan :)
5) Buy multiples of the same color shirt when I get them on a good sale (for example, $11.40 Izod polo's recently marked down from $38). I just wash them and stack them on the shelf till I need them
6) Butcher meat at my brothers house vs. buying at the store
7) Buy spaghetti sauce in Ball jars and use the Ball jars for all kinds of things around the house - really handy for storage, etc
8) Use coupons often when we go out for diner. It's amazing how many people squirm in their seats when they see you use - oh the horror - a coupon at a restaurant. However, often we have $10 off $20, etc coupons and that changes peoples minds. :)
9) My wife and I still take $20 a paycheck in "blow" money - the same as we did 10 years ago when we made less than 1/2 of what we do now. Don't spend it all in one place...
10) My wife is a very skilled crafter - she makes a tremendous number of gifts (a really cute knitted new born set that everyone seems to really appreciate).
11) I tend to wear shoes for ridiculous amounts of time - I recently threw out a pair of work shoes I had worn faithfully to the office for 5 years - too bad they had separated along the inside and the sole - about 2 years ago. Just tired of the wet socks - and my wifes persistent complaints about them being unprofessional. :)
12) Drive for fuel economy - currently get between 43 and 45 MPG in my 2009 Corolla (previous Corolla was sold with almost a quarter of a million miles on it).
13) Often we will go to the library, I mean Borders, to read the periodicals. Every once and a while we'll buy one. However, to offset, my wife usually buys one of those $4 pink ice drink things... they taste good, but I don't want to think about the cost to value ratio.
14) Learned how to prune my own trees instead of paying someone to do that
15) Learned how to manage my own investments instead of paying someone to do that :)
16) Realized a long time ago that paying for regular maintenance on my car is a frugal thing in the long run as a well maintained car tends to last
17) Don't drink coffee - it's too expensive and a bad habit. Instead on really cold mornings just drink a glass of hot water.
18) We only own one set of bed sheets. We remove them in the morning, wash and dry (or hang out to dry when we can) and put them back on. No $100 set rotating through the closet.

I'm sure there are more (I get abuse at work for being cheap, I mean frugal, all the time), but that's all that came to mind.
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Postby Cherokee8215 » Sat Aug 29, 2009 10:14 pm

mickeyd wrote:
CodeMaster wrote:I buy books from Borders and make sure I read it before the 30 day return limit then I return it.


Doesn't your town have a public library? Your practice, while clever, seems unethical to me.


Forget buying the book from Borders, I just sit there in one of the nice chairs they provide in many of the sections and read the book in the store without buying. I have been known to spend 4 hours in a Borders or B&N store at a time. And I don't even buy the coffee.
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Postby isleep » Sun Aug 30, 2009 12:28 am

CodeMaster wrote:I actually researched RV's and Trailers... they are like studios! Which is what I'm staying in now to save money and its really comfortable and I'm happy though it costs 1 grand a month . I was wondering, would you know where in the Bay Area around SF or the surrounding cities could you peacefully park a trailer or RV so you could actually live there without any police problems in general but still be connected to the city to go to work, do laundry, etc... got any ideas? Or any ideas on how to find locations where people do that around here?


Yeah some of the newer trailers are quite impressive, and I could easily see myself living in a 25-30 foot TT fulltime for the rest of my life, once I decide to "settle down". There are some really nice used ones going for $5-10K. Around the Tampa Bay area, you can find cheap RV parks for $250-300/mo, and I imagine costs are similar out west. You just have to avoid the "restorts" and other expensive places that attract a certain kind of snooty clientele who look down on anyone whose rig isn't a recent-model class-A RV of $250k or greater value. I don't know anything about the SF area, but if you ask here, someone will probably know:
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Postby mickeyd » Sun Aug 30, 2009 1:19 pm

Cherokee8215 wrote:
mickeyd wrote:
CodeMaster wrote:I buy books from Borders and make sure I read it before the 30 day return limit then I return it.


Doesn't your town have a public library? Your practice, while clever, seems unethical to me.


Forget buying the book from Borders, I just sit there in one of the nice chairs they provide in many of the sections and read the book in the store without buying. I have been known to spend 4 hours in a Borders or B&N store at a time. And I don't even buy the coffee.


I have also taken time, though not that long, to read part of a book. Since the chairs are provided for readers , the books are readily available and coffee purchase is not required, this practice seems OK to me.
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Postby ResearchMed » Sun Aug 30, 2009 1:46 pm

Sidney wrote:
retiredjg wrote:Maybe it was a joke?


Might be -- but years ago my wife knew young women who would buy a high end dress in a shop, wear it to an event, get it cleaned (mainly to get it pressed) and then return it to the shop. Some people just have a strange idea about right and wrong.


Someone like this REALLY got me angry: A woman who OWNED a small fashion boutique. She therefore had all the proper equipment to attach and and remove the tags and anti-theft devices.

So she would buy things elsewhere (of fancier types than her store sold), remove all tags/devices, wear them, replace all tags/devices and return them.

I was genuinely appalled: SHE should know more than just about anyone else how costly that type of "lost revenue" is!

No, I did not know her personally, and my friend who DID know her personally declined to do anything other than listen to her updates. (My friend is still my friend; that other woman is no longer in touch, but still running her shop; I only know because every now and then I look on the Internet [the location is many states away]. Always wished someone would do the same thing to HER, and then somehow let her know!)

Taking advantage of others isn't an appropriate way to make money *or* save money. But there will always be people who do those things, unfortunately.

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Postby Boglenaut » Sun Aug 30, 2009 2:15 pm

Being frugal is good.

Being dishonest is not.
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Postby RAllen » Sun Aug 30, 2009 3:47 pm

I was sick and tired of the high cost of low living.

Thermos, so I can bring excellent coffee or tea with me to class instead of buying lesser quality stuff for a dollar or more a cup.

Mr Bento Lunch Box ($35/shipped amazon) has hot and warm compartments that insulate for 6+ hours so I can bring a good lunch with me anywhere even with no microwave. Fast Food is not cheap (even if you only spend $2-3 off the dollar menu) and is not healthy. Chicken and rice is cheaper (or whatever left overs or frozen prepared meals you may have), tastes better and I don't have to waste my lunch break walking to get food/standing in line.

Flask, I can bring 7 oz's of liquor with me to the bar and order a coke (usually free). Admittedly, this one is down right cheap, but as a college student going out 2-3 nights a week is ridiculously expensive and why most of my peers go through money like no tomorrow.

Clothes purchases are always made use deep discounts or used. I am in to high end clothing, so I usually anticipate what I will be able to later sell the item for. I am constantly buying and selling clothes as a hobby, separate from my eBay business. I can usually wear incredibly high end clothes (i.e. Saks 5th Ave and beyond) for essentially free-- a huge benefit of the hobby (and I enjoy fashion).

On a similar note, by having multiple pairs of shoes, you'll never "destroy" pairs like you do when you always wear the same pair.

Hair trimmer, I buzz my entire head to a 1 anyways so $50 on a trimmer has been a great investment. I can buzz myself every week or two instead of waiting longer, and it saves me $13/pop. I also use it to shave my yorkie, which saves me a ton cash ($40-50/per grooming).

I would recommend NOT buying the cheapest Walmart piece of crap you can find. Not only will those cheap ones break, they just don't cut hair as well. If you think you will get a lot of use out of it the Oyster Classic 76 is an incredible machine for $100-150 new that will hold up forever.

One of my faults is cars. I love cars, and I allow myself this luxury because my rent is so incredibly cheap, and I don't splurge on other consumer goods.

I have a BMW 330xi, which is my main car and I did not purchase it to buy/sell like a commodity. On the other hand, I generally have a second car that I do hunt for a deal on. Right now, I have a '99 Civic SI which has 50K original miles on it and I purchased it for $6500. Right now I can sell it for $10-13K to a collector after putting 10K miles on it already. This keeps miles off my main car which is also a benefit.

Otherwise I do most of the no-brainers, library for magazines/books, no cable TV, internet is included in rent ($475 divided in 2), I ride the bus a lot(free with college ID), etc. etc. Purchase stuff in bulk at Sam's Club. Also on the look out for little Fat Wallet tricks to earn an extra couple bucks, and I sell on eBay.
Last edited by RAllen on Sun Aug 30, 2009 5:42 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: That Frugal Thing You Do

Postby bstevlin » Sun Aug 30, 2009 3:55 pm

Boglenaut wrote:This being the Boglehead board, I suspect many of us were frugal even before being frugal was the new chic.

So, what's the frugal thing you do?

Have you been doing it since before the recession?

For us, it's having only one car -- a 2004 Civic. We almost bought a second family car in 2006, but realized we just didn't need it. We live in the suburbs and have two kids, but I work from home and my wife takes care of the kids. So as long as we coordinate for my lunch break, we get by fine with one reliable car. Even when my wife worked for 7 months, we were fine as long as I was willing to eat lunch at home.

I love having a lot of space in the garage, one car to maintain, one to insure, etc. We only drive 7K miles a year, so gas isn't even much.


My wife and I are retired. However; we both found part time jobs that we enjoy. The extra money is nice (we have not had to take money from our IRA accounts) but the fulfilment of working is more important. We also cut back on traveling. We just got tired of being told how lucky we are to be on there cruises and tours after being treated shabbily by cruise ship lines, airlines, tour companies and hotels. All of them are getting more grungy, the food is getting worse, they are always trying to sell extra excursions, and the help is getting even more surly especially management. For travel experience I read the New York Times or Washington Post travel sections. I just tell myself hey maybe I will do that some day and but it does not cost me anything.
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Postby celia » Sun Aug 30, 2009 4:25 pm

stevewolfe wrote:I'm sure there are more (I get abuse at work for being cheap, I mean frugal, all the time), but that's all that came to mind.

Luckily, I've worked a couple of places where there were several thrifty co-workers. At one place, it was like a contest to see who could do better. A few people never bought anything unless they could get a good deal on it.

Moral: Hang out with co-workers who think like you. In time, those who aren't thrifty will wish they were and had savings!
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Postby mfen » Sun Aug 30, 2009 4:35 pm

Take advantage of other people's foolishness.
Example: Bought a 4 year old Maytag dishwasher from a friend for $10.
It just wasn't the right color for her.
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Postby Boglenaut » Sun Aug 30, 2009 5:41 pm

So, what are the limits of frugality?

I'd say, off the top of my head:

1. Nothing illegal, dishonest or unethical
2. Nothing that jeopardizes health or safety
3. Things that cause unreasonable relationship problems. The key judgment here is "what is unreasonable?"
4. Anything that causes unreasonable hardship or embarrassment. Again, the key word is "unreasonable".
5. Anything that causes greater costs or regret down the road (no oil changes for the car, not fixing leaks in the roof, no family pictures this year because film is cheaper next year, etc.)

Any I am missing?
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Postby strafe » Sun Aug 30, 2009 6:35 pm

stevewolfe wrote:We only own one set of bed sheets. We remove them in the morning, wash and dry (or hang out to dry when we can) and put them back on. No $100 set rotating through the closet.


How is that frugal? Your one set will wear out twice as fast as rotating through two. One set or ten sets, the cost is ultimately the same.
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Postby sscritic » Sun Aug 30, 2009 6:57 pm

strafe wrote:
stevewolfe wrote:We only own one set of bed sheets. We remove them in the morning, wash and dry (or hang out to dry when we can) and put them back on. No $100 set rotating through the closet.


How is that frugal? Your one set will wear out twice as fast as rotating through two. One set or ten sets, the cost is ultimately the same.

He buys one set for $100. He invests another $100 in TSM. 10 years later, he buys a new set of sheets. If the $100 in TSM grows after tax to more than the then current cost of the second set of sheets, he has the difference saved in TSM shares. If he buys two sets at the start for $200, he has nothing set aside in TSM. So it is only frugal if you think the after tax value of TSM will increase faster than the after tax cost of a set of sheets (allowing for a possible increase in the sales tax rate).

A better strategy might be to wait for a good "white sale" and buy sheets for $50 instead of $100.
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Postby market timer » Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:25 pm

1. Have no children.
2. Have no car.
3. Buy furniture on Craigslist.
4. Get scholarships.
5. Use 0% balance transfer offers to consolidate high interest debt.
6. Enjoy business travel.
7. Exercise.
8. Charge everything and maximize rewards.
9. Pay for quality.
10. Find meaning and satisfaction in one's career, not in a luxury car.
11. Always value your time.
12. Drink before going to the club.

Personally, I think frugality is overrated. I focus on income.
Last edited by market timer on Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby market timer » Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:34 pm

sscritic wrote:So it is only frugal if you think the after tax value of TSM will increase faster than the after tax cost of a set of sheets (allowing for a possible increase in the sales tax rate).


Hmm, I'd look at the sheets as like a commodities fund with no tax. Knowing nothing about the cotton market, I will say that other commodities are in steep contango, so with available storage capacity and convenience yield of fresh linens, it might be worth locking in the current spot rate. Plus, you never know when you'll need a clean set of sheets. You'll be sleeping well if inflation and tax rates increase.
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Postby Boglenaut » Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:43 pm

market timer wrote:
sscritic wrote:So it is only frugal if you think the after tax value of TSM will increase faster than the after tax cost of a set of sheets (allowing for a possible increase in the sales tax rate).


Hmm, I'd look at the sheets as like a commodities fund with no tax. Knowing nothing about the cotton market, I will say that other commodities are in steep contango, so with available storage capacity and convenience yield of fresh linens, it might be worth locking in the current spot rate. Plus, you never know when you'll need a clean set of sheets. You'll be sleeping well if inflation and tax rates increase.


Sheets as commodities, detailed analysis.... I MUST be on the Bogleheads page! :wink: :wink: :wink:

Edit - My wife just asked what I was laughing about.
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Postby VictoriaF » Sun Aug 30, 2009 8:30 pm

Boglenaut wrote:
market timer wrote:
sscritic wrote:So it is only frugal if you think the after tax value of TSM will increase faster than the after tax cost of a set of sheets (allowing for a possible increase in the sales tax rate).


Hmm, I'd look at the sheets as like a commodities fund with no tax. Knowing nothing about the cotton market, I will say that other commodities are in steep contango, so with available storage capacity and convenience yield of fresh linens, it might be worth locking in the current spot rate. Plus, you never know when you'll need a clean set of sheets. You'll be sleeping well if inflation and tax rates increase.


Sheets as commodities, detailed analysis.... I MUST be on the Bogleheads page! :wink: :wink: :wink:

Edit - My wife just asked what I was laughing about.

A frugal thing is not to wash sheets. You don't want your commodities to be under water!

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Postby Cherokee8215 » Sun Aug 30, 2009 9:12 pm

RAllen wrote:Flask, I can bring 7 oz's of liquor with me to the bar and order a coke (usually free). Admittedly, this one is down right cheap, but as a college student going out 2-3 nights a week is ridiculously expensive and why most of my peers go through money like no tomorrow.


Don't feel bad about this one, I do it myself and I'm years out of college. Works great when you go with friends to a place that wants $8 for a drink. Especially if you like to drink as often/much as I do. Just be discreet so the staff doesn't see you drinking from it or pouring from it. And if driving/riding in a car, put it in the trunk of the car so you can't get busted for some kind of "open container" violation if the cops pull you over.
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Postby LonePrairie » Sun Aug 30, 2009 9:23 pm

I've done many of these things for years, not primarily to save money but to avoid waste and save energy. I live comfortably and buy everything I really want. I also

--carry my lunch to work
--enjoy great coffee at home but never buy coffee away from home unless I'm traveling or eating breakfast out.
--walk to work and run most errands on foot
--sold my car ten years ago and invested the proceeds in Vanguard funds
--never buy individual bottles of water
--don't drink soda
--eat no meat, fish, or poultry
--conserve electricity in ways too numerous to mention
--have my hair cut at a local shop instead of a trendy salon
--color my hair at home
--do my own pedicures and manicures
--have no cable TV; watch shows I like for free at legal sites such as hulu.com or pay for them at Amazon's video on demand
--have a Netflix membership instead of going to movies
--have no debts so never pay interest
--use a prepaid Tracfone
--view shopping as a chore, not recreation

I was widowed at a young age; I've never married or lived with anyone since. At this point I can't imagine having a permanent relationship because most men I know haven't given a thought to saving for retirement and I couldn't live so heedlessly.
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Postby Grt2bOutdoors » Mon Aug 31, 2009 12:17 pm

Make my own lunch and brown-bag it to work.
Buy in bulk, when on sale. If macaroni normally sells for $1 box and it goes on sale for 80 cents, then back up the cart (notice I didn't say, "back up the truck") and load up.
Same goes for meats and chicken; if the freezer has room and I can save $1 to $4 a lb, then i'm stocking up.
Don't buy pre-processed lunch meats - not healthy, and more expensive per pound than the real stuff.
Mow my own grass - after the initial investment outlay for the mower, it has a fast payback, plus it's good exercise.
Pick up pennies.
Don't buy beer in a bar - a hard liquor drink typically lasts longer than 2 beers, unless of course, you are in a "drinking" mood.
Don't buy fast food - no McD's, no Wendy's, no Burger King, no Ranch1
though, I wish there was an In-n-Out here on the east coast.
Plant a garden - nothing like your own tomatoes and eggplant, even the neighborhood rabbit appreciates my efforts . :roll:
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Postby simpleinvesting1 » Mon Aug 31, 2009 5:00 pm

I have done some of things that are mentioned in this thread.

1. Bring my lunch to work 3 times a week.
2. Use Costco coupons to stock up things that I am going to use in the next few months.
3. Limit the number of times to go out dinner every month.
4. Found a boy friend that has similar financial goals
5. Do not waste on food and other things.
5. Involve kids if possible for frugal activities. This really works well. For example, I took my kids to county fair and set the limit for the rides each kid can take - $25.00 each. And let them decide what rides they take. Since they know their upper limit, they are more careful than I do. They choose their favorate rides but also as many rides as they can with this money.
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Electric Savings...

Postby Ilovevolleyball » Tue Mar 02, 2010 1:27 pm

Installed Solar Electric on Roof and I really try to save Electricity...

Here are some of the Energy Savings Things I do....

Set up strips for TV and computer and turn those off.

Saves aprx 10-15% of Yearly electric Bill. Easy way to stop this is to set up a strip and turn off power when not using it there. Like TV, Stereo, DVD, game playing system... Computer, monitor, stereo, internet connection...

Insulated Attic and Crawl Space. Electric Heat costs too much.
Got a timer for the Heater to only heat at specific times.
Keep home pretty cold.... 60-65 during the day...

Got a timer for the Water Heater...
Insulated all water pipes cold and hot. Hot to save money. Cold to 1. not have hot bleed out thru the cold and 2. to not worry about freezing pipes as much.

Hot water heater blanket installed.
Put in Insulation behind all electric jack faceplates and light switches... Such and easy thing to do and house much less drafty after doing that.

Weaterized doors and windows with caulking and strips.

Large gaps between home and crawl space filled up with calk or foam sealant.

Electric Bill expected to be 600$ a year.... and subtracting energy solar produces and the savings from planned projects might get to 300$ yearly.
25$ a month....

Future Plans for saving electrictity:

Note.... payback be dammed!

1. New Electric Water heater, so that can be a little more efficient and so that can place pad under it. I can't believe there is no pad!! Save ? 25$ a year maybe.

2. New TV. Save ? 10$ a year

3. Heat Pump for Heat and AC. Save ? 60-100$ a year?

4. Insulate walls and put in new siding on home to have R20.... but this may not happen....

Mike
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Postby VictoriaF » Tue Mar 02, 2010 7:08 pm

Pull out staples and straighten them for the next use :)

Victoria
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Drive to work

Postby JerryB » Tue Mar 02, 2010 8:26 pm

Reduced my commute from 30 to 5 miles per day by retiring at 55 and getting a local part time job for about $100K less than I was making including the government FERS pension.
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Postby gouldnm » Wed Mar 03, 2010 7:57 pm

Here's how I save money:

I have a 5 minute commute to work (and no traffic lights!)

My husband and I live in a townhome, even though we could afford a house

clipping coupons--especially for restaurants

buy much of our stuff at warehouse stores (nothing saves money like buying kitty litter in bulk)

quit my health club membership--walking is cheaper

brown bag lunch

Don't take expensive vacations

Both my husband and I have rewards credit cards. I got my laptop for free, and we usually have enough points saved up to stay at hotels for free.

Clean my own house.

While I bought my car new, I intend to keep driving it as long as possible (It's 11 years old now). When I do buy another car, my only criterion will be reliability--I neither need nor desire a fancy car.

No expensive hobbies. Will not go into debt for my hobby.

New heat pump and energy efficient windows save us over 100 dollars a month in heating and air conditioning bills
Last edited by gouldnm on Wed Mar 03, 2010 8:24 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby gouldnm » Wed Mar 03, 2010 8:15 pm

Sidney wrote:
retiredjg wrote:Maybe it was a joke?


Might be -- but years ago my wife knew young women who would buy a high end dress in a shop, wear it to an event, get it cleaned (mainly to get it pressed) and then return it to the shop. Some people just have a strange idea about right and wrong.


I once went out to a movie at a mall with some friends. The girlfriend bought a sweater at Macy's, wore it to the movie, and then returned it right after we left the theater.
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Postby Almost there » Wed Mar 03, 2010 9:52 pm

GRT2BOUTDOORS wrote:
I wish there was an In-n-Out here on the east coast.

There is one in Andover NJ on Rt. 206.

I have been frugal my whole life - learned it while growing up from my parents and has served me well. Happy to find now that there are many others like me. Thank you everyone for your input.
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Postby Atilla » Wed Mar 03, 2010 10:15 pm

1. Cheap mortgage on a cheap house.
2. Keep investing expenses low.
3. No interest payments other than the 4.375% fixed mortgage.
4. Don't buy too much useless crap.
5. Krups espresso machine in the kitchen keeps me away from the coffee bar.
6. Wife and I brown bag lunch almost every day. I work from home, so I skip the bag.
7. Sneak booze into the topless pool at Mandalay Bay and just order diet Pepsi all afternoon.
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Postby Random Musings » Wed Mar 03, 2010 10:21 pm

No cable TV since 1996. Run cars into the ground.

However, I pick and choose my spots. For example, I buy high quality Amish made furniture (from the shops), original artwork and so on......

You can buy really nice things for reasonable prices, but I won't overpay just for a brand name or hype......

RM
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Postby VictoriaF » Wed Mar 03, 2010 10:26 pm

Atilla wrote:7. Sneak booze into the topless pool at Mandalay Bay and just order diet Pepsi all afternoon.

I knew that bottomless was wasteful; I did not know that topless was frugal.

Victoria
Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
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Postby manuvns » Thu Mar 04, 2010 2:17 am

no debt except fixed mortgage at 4.5% . live in cheap house . try to save money only on big purchases ( e.g used cars , big appliances etc ) . avoid taxes by maxing 401k
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Postby TJAJ9 » Thu Mar 04, 2010 4:06 am

Atilla wrote:7. Sneak booze into the topless pool at Mandalay Bay and just order diet Pepsi all afternoon.


Nice. :lol:
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Postby Almost there » Thu Mar 04, 2010 8:18 pm

Attila wrote:
7. Sneak booze into the topless pool at Mandalay Bay and just order diet Pepsi all afternoon.

male or female?

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Postby MWCA » Thu Mar 04, 2010 8:23 pm

Have no children is a great way to be frugal. Unless you produce offspring who can earn you more than what you would put into them. :)
We are all worms. But I believe that I am a glow-worm.
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Postby valuefan » Mon May 31, 2010 3:34 am

black jack wrote:
isleep wrote:
preserve wrote:So is staying single frugal or not frugal?


Staying single may be divorce insurance, but it sure ain't health insurance.

Interestingly enough, single never-married women live longer than other women. :shock:
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Postby JerseyKC » Mon May 31, 2010 6:20 pm

A few from this corner:

1. Someone else mentioned Marshall's/TJ Maxx > we have 3 within a 15 mile radius of me. Always get boxers, white tees (for work), socks (athletic and work) and ties (worn daily) at Marshall's. Great prices. Ties alone cost $45 at Macy's; can get 5 for $45 at Marshall's. Their stock wasn't very good for a couple of years but just got a bunch of nice ones this past week. Also not a disaster if something should stain one of them...

2. Have 1 new and 1 used car. The "new" car is a Scion xD, great for the commute and longer trips with 40 mpg. Old car is a 2001 Chevy Prizm (Corolla clone) with 118,000k.

3. Dress shirts (to go with the tie for work) > hard to beat the quality and prices at JC Penney > always go with their Stafford brand when they are selling at least 50% below MSRP at about $18 each. Recently heard that they are the largest retailer of dress shirts in the US > so not exactly a secret.

4. Dress pants (for work) > my weight tends to fluctuate a bit (10-15 pounds) so I buy the Hagger brand with the hidden adjustable waistband. Sometimes Penney's has them on sale (when getting shirts) but almost always cheaper at Kohl's and they usually have a better selection. New Balance sneakers are usually a good buy at Kohl's as well.

...and live somewhere where there is some competitive shopping avenues all of the above (including 2 of the Marshall's) are within 5 miles of our house.

5. Shoes: Penney's brand or Deer Stalker work well for me and have a couple of sets of flexible Danner insoles. Always at less than their MSRP.

6. Always ask around about sales > recently our Ramsey Outdoor Store had Danner Radical GTX boots for $75; I looked at them when they were MSRP $175 but was much happier at the lower price. My Dunham White Clouds were pushing 10 and not that waterproof any more...heard about the sale when I went into the post office and 2 ppl were discussing the annual sale going on there...just walked up the strip mall street.
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Lottery

Postby JerryB » Mon May 31, 2010 10:24 pm

Buy $5 Lotto ticket only when it is over $5 million. Avoid Megamillions due to much worse odds.
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Postby rayout » Tue Jun 01, 2010 8:54 pm

1. Manage my own money
2. Do my own taxes
3. Abuse CVS deals
4. Cook at home, prepare my own lunches
5. Use coupons when I eat out
6. Bought my car used (1994 Civic, no AC, 29 MPG in the winter, 30+ MPG in the summer)
7. Resell stuff I no longer use at Craigslist.
8. Hunt for deals for all big ticket purchases.
9. Renegotiate all re-occuring bills as soon as the "deal" expires.
10. Always try to fix a car/house problem on my own before hiring a mechanic. It doesn't take a genius to replace a lightbulb.
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Postby celia » Tue Jun 01, 2010 9:08 pm

JerseyKC wrote:2. Have 1 new and 1 used car. The "new" car is a Scion xD, great for the commute and longer trips with 40 mpg. Old car is a 2001 Chevy Prizm (Corolla clone) with 118,000k.


Wow! 118,000,000 miles on your car! How'd you do it? How'd you do it in only 9 years?
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Re: Lottery

Postby JordanIB » Tue Jun 01, 2010 9:34 pm

JerryB wrote:Avoid Megamillions due to much worse odds.


But the EV is often much higher than the state lottery.
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Postby fishndoc » Wed Jun 02, 2010 8:16 am

I've done many of these things for years, not primarily to save money but to avoid waste and save energy

One of my favorite outdoor and flyfishing writers is the late Harry Middleton. He often wrote the phrase that his goal was to ".. get through life doing as little damage/harm to the world as possible".

At first, I viewed it as simply leaving the streams and woods you visit as you found them. I have come to view it as a sort of Holistic approach to life: take and use what you really need (& occasionally just want) in life, but not more.

I have come to view waste as a sin, and a "theft" from future generations.
" Successful investing involves doing just a few things right, and avoiding serious mistakes." - J. Bogle
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Postby monkey_business » Wed Jun 02, 2010 2:07 pm

I became homeless to save money. There are far too many benefits, but just to name a few:

- No bills of any kind. I don't care how energy efficient your fridge is, I don't even have one.
- I live by work and just walk there. No car, no gas costs, and free exercise. If I feel like exercising more, I just move further away.
- Some people give me stuff for free if I ask. I got a whole chicken sandwich once (with pickles).
- No repairs needed of any kind. I never need a plumber. I don't need to buy A/C filters. My shopping cart does need occasional service though. It's about my only expense.
- I can contribute 97% of my income to my investments.
- I got a nice tan.
- Since worn out clothing is in style, I look very fashionable most of the time without buying any new clothing. In fact, if in a few years ripped clothing will become very trendy, my clothing will naturally evolve into that trend.
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Postby Go Blue 99 » Fri Jun 04, 2010 12:29 pm

Rent movies via Netflix, Blockbuster Online, or RedBox instead of going to a theater.
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