digital camera buying advice

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digital camera buying advice

Postby rsw748 » Mon Jun 24, 2013 10:31 am

I'm a beginner in photography. So far I've been using canon point and shoot cameras. Thinking of buying a better camera to shoot my 9 and 3 year old children.
My main complaints about the point and shoots have been their zoom restriction, slowness and quality.
I'm looking at compact system cameras due to their comparable picture quality with DSLR cameras and portability. I'll be mostly using their 'auto' mode.
I am doubtful if I'll have time to explore the manual features. I'm planning to spend about $500 - $600. My questions are -

- are there alternatives to compact system cameras for my requirements
- are these compact system cameras can be carried in pocket
- can they be used for next 7,8 years before upgrading


Thanks in advance.
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby PacNorWest » Mon Jun 24, 2013 1:12 pm

I sense that you don't have time to read up on the topic very much.
But if you do, then http://www.dpreview.com/ would be the place to get the information that you need.

I think this might help you short cut to what you need. . .use the Amazon.com link at the top of this page.
Search: Sony NEX-6L/B 16.1 MP Compact Interchangeable Lens Digital Camera with 16-50mm Power Zoom Lens and 3-Inch LED
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby obgraham » Mon Jun 24, 2013 3:11 pm

When things went digital, I, like many others, ditched the thousands of dollars I'd spent on fancy Nikon stuff, and went to point-and-shoot.

Now I'm using a couple of upper-end Canon point-and-shoots, the G-11 and the S-5, neither of which the the latest and greatest. I've traveled a lot and shot thousands of pix with these. The zoom is too long for me to hand-hold, and both cameras are fast. I use auto-mode about half the time, and either p-mode or full manual the rest.

I've watched co-travelers, to see what they use. Some use the DSLR's with really nice lenses. The pros:

My pointyshooty: Much lighter, 12x optical zoom fine for me. File size also adequate. Indoor pics are good if there is adequate direct light, or I use a minitripod. Built-in flash more trouble than it is worth. Picture noise (grain) if ASA is beyond 800 indoors. Mine don't have RAW option.

The DSLRs: More weight to carry. Better low-light capability, especially pushing ASA out beyond 800 or so. Much better options available in manual modes. Ability to use a nice fast telephoto or zoom lens, bulky as that might be. Shoots in RAW format if you wish. Requires a lot more greenbacks at purchase time. Especially that nifty lens!

For me, the weight/bulk saving is worth it, and for 90% of my purposes the pointy is enough.
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby Mister Whale » Mon Jun 24, 2013 4:01 pm

" ... advice is most useful and at its best, not when it is telling you what to do, but when it is illuminating aspects of the situation you hadn't thought about." --nisiprius
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby stupidkid » Mon Jun 24, 2013 4:22 pm

Mister Whale wrote:Sony RX100.


I just got this camera last week after reading many reviews, including dpreview.com and talking to my local camera store where everyone was overly enthusiastic about this model. So far, it's great. Very easy to use, incredibly crisp photos, and solidly built. I've yet to take any photos worthy of its capability, but I know it'll more than suffice for my panorama mountain shots here in the Rockies.
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby core5 » Mon Jun 24, 2013 4:38 pm

You can use snapsort.com to run comparisons on current cameras vs. the one you have. 90% of the time if you go to google.com com and type in "Camera A vx. Camera B" it'll give you a snapsort comparison page. Since you're focusing on improving a couple of aspects (capture speed and size) you should be able to make good use of that site.

There are some more recent models (e.g. the Sony DSC-HX30V) that are hybrids of DSLRs and small pocket cameras.
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby nimo956 » Mon Jun 24, 2013 5:18 pm

Forget digital cameras! What you really want is a 20x24 large format film camera:

Image
50% VTI / 50% VXUS
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby mlipps » Mon Jun 24, 2013 5:31 pm

Just commenting to follow as I've been meaning to ask this forum nearly the same question.
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby playtothebeat » Mon Jun 24, 2013 5:35 pm

If you're taking a lot of pics of your kids, I would say a DSLR is a solid investment. I have a Nikon D5100, which I absolutely love. I only have one after-market (i.e. non-bundled) lens for it, and it's fantastic for portraits and people in general, as it's EXTREMELY quick.
Of course, it is not "compact", so that's something you have to decide on. For me, the flexibility of being able to get multiple lenses is worth it. I can also truly tell that picture quality from this camera (and it's not even a high end DSLR by any means; in fact, it's probably one of the "lower end") has been exponentially better than any non-DSLR i've used in the past.

to answer your question more directly - the Nikon 1 is a good compact (mirrorless) system. I think it can fit in a pocket (with the lens removed). You can buy lenses in the future so it will definitely last you 7-8 years.
Last edited by playtothebeat on Mon Jun 24, 2013 5:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby neurosphere » Mon Jun 24, 2013 5:36 pm

I knew nothing about photography, and always used a typical point and shoot and was content with everything but the performance in low-light settings. My camera broke, and I decided to move up a step.

I purchased a Sony NEX-F3 and I LOVE it. I can use it in fully automatic mode and never have to worry, it has a built in flash, it has interchangable lenses if I want to play around, but the zoom lens it comes with is just fine on its own.

But it has been a lot of fun playing with the settings and learning some cool tricks. I can get the shot I want first in auto mode, then I very quickly switch to semi-automatic or fully manual and play around and see what the effects are.

So I recommend looking at any of the Sony NEX line. It's great for fully automatic photos, but you can also upgrade, if you wish, some day with new lenses if that becomes your thing.
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby JArthur » Mon Jun 24, 2013 5:56 pm

I second the D5100 as a great all around camera as I've been using one for over a year. If you want to use just one lens all of the time then don't bother with the kit lens, but rather I recommend this Sigma lens for a nearly perfect "walk about" lens which will do for 90%+ of everything you will want to shoot. It is the default lens on my camera and I've used it for portraits, vacations, and photography for professional artwork.

http://www.amazon.com/Sigma-18-250mm-f3-5-6-3-Digital-Cameras/dp/B008B48AAE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1372110639&sr=8-1&keywords=sigma+18-250
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby pennstater2005 » Mon Jun 24, 2013 10:41 pm

If you are planning on picture taking of your kids when they're in motion go for the dslr camera instead. You can still get in at that price point. Check out the Nikon d5100. Also you'll get much better low light photography.

Edit: I see from above I'm a little late to the party.
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby Watty » Mon Jun 24, 2013 11:40 pm

Just a few general comments;

1) Be sure to try out the camera to see if you like how it feels in your hands and how the controls are laid out. Different people have different preferences so reading reviews or getting recommendations will not tell you what works best for you. This is especially true if you are left handed or wear glasses.

2) It is somewhat of a trite phase but the saying, "The best camera is the one that you actually have with you." is very true. If you have a camera that is too large, too heavy, or too expensive to comfortably carry around with you most of the time then that is a big negative.

3) All cameras have compromises. My wife and I both have the "superzoom" type of cameras that have really impressive zooms, but their sensor is so small that they are not very good for low light or fast action shots. That works for us(most of the time) for our vacation shots but for kids these are not a real good choice.

4) If you decide to go with a DSLR then consider getting a used one. A model that is a few years old would be a big step up for you and you can get a pretty good used body for about $200 now. When you are pricing the camera be sure to find out how much the batteries will cost since some of them can be expensive. A very good strategy is to buy a good basic budget camera body and to put most of your money into getting good lenses. Eventually if you get into photography you can buy a better body and still keep your good lenses.
Here is a link to a reputable used camera store;
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby black jack » Tue Jun 25, 2013 12:04 am

I went through the same process you're facing seven years ago. I'd been using digital point and shoot cameras (Nikon Coolpix 5000 and 8400), and while they worked well, I was frustrated by their poor low-light performance and slow start-up. I bought a Nikon D50, which I'm still using after 7 years. I can turn it on, focus, and take a photo in about a second, and it has pretty good low light performance, even with the kit lens. So it is easy to get a camera that doesn't need upgrading for 7-8 years. As others have said, a Nikon D5100 would be fine, or even a D3100.

As others have said, http://www.dpreview.com is the Bogleheads of digital photography. I also like Ken Rockwell (http://www.kenrockwell.com) for his continual insistence that it's not about the camera (which reminds me, we recently had a thread examining whether a $5,000 bicycle represented value for money, but I haven't seen any threads asking that question about $5,000 cameras).

If you're mostly interested in taking photos of your young children (as was I), many, perhaps even most, of those pictures will be taken indoors. The single best thing you can do to improve those photos is to buy an external flash with a swivel head that enables you to angle it so as to bounce the light of the flash off the ceiling overhead or the wall behind you. I'm too lazy to post examples, but search Google images for "bounce flash vs direct flash" to get an idea of the difference it can make. I often take a few casual photos at indoor events (e.g., birthday parties my child is attending) where the hosts are shooting photos with point and shoot cameras, and later send them copies of the photos I took. They think I'm a great photographer because my photos generally look much better than theirs, but it's just that they're using the direct flash on their cameras (producing the mug shot effect) while I'm using an external flash and bouncing the light. You don't have to have a DSLR to do this; you just need a camera with a hot shoe, which some point and shoot cameras have.
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby neurosphere » Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:26 am

black jack wrote:The single best thing you can do to improve those photos is to buy an external flash with a swivel head that enables you to angle it so as to bounce the light of the flash off the ceiling overhead or the wall behind you. I'm too lazy to post examples, but search Google images for "bounce flash vs direct flash" to get an idea of the difference it can make. I often take a few casual photos at indoor events (e.g., birthday parties my child is attending) where the hosts are shooting photos with point and shoot cameras, and later send them copies of the photos I took. They think I'm a great photographer because my photos generally look much better than theirs, but it's just that they're using the direct flash on their cameras (producing the mug shot effect) while I'm using an external flash and bouncing the light. You don't have to have a DSLR to do this; you just need a camera with a hot shoe, which some point and shoot cameras have.


Fyi, the built-in flash on the Sony Nex-f3 has this bounce feature. You can point it up to the ceiling when shooting. I do this almost all the time when taking indoor shots, to avoid that shiny-bright glare one sees off peoples faces/glasses/etc in indoor shots. The only annoying thing about pointing the flash upwards is that it requires it to be held up in place with your left hand while you aim the camera and shoot with your right. A dedicated flash on a hot-shoe could just be pointed in your desired direction and left there.

On the other hand, despite the versatility of an external flash, I would NEVER have the patience to deal with a bigger camera AND have to pack a flash. Coming from a point-and-shoot, a mirrorless camera with giant sensor, interchangable lens with built-in flash was a GIANT upgrade, and I don't feel I needed to go to a DSLR.
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby Mister Whale » Tue Jun 25, 2013 10:01 am

rsw748 wrote:My main complaints about the point and shoots have been their zoom restriction, slowness and quality.


The Sony camera that I mentioned above has none (except possibly for zoom?) of these limitations, and I highly recommend that you read the short review in my above post as it sounds like it is exactly what you are looking for. I don't feel any need for more zoom with mine, there's virtually no shutter lag, and quality of images is as good (or in some ways better) than it is with my Canon D30 (5-year-old DSLR) with premium L-lens except for bokeh.

rsw748 wrote:- are there alternatives to compact system cameras for my requirements


Not if you want something to carry in your pocket.

rsw748 wrote:- are these compact system cameras can be carried in pocket


Any compact with a retracting lens will be relatively easy to carry.

rsw748 wrote:- can they be used for next 7,8 years before upgrading


Depends on the advances in camera photography in the next 7 or 8 years. :D
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby Ozonewanderer » Tue Jun 25, 2013 11:21 pm

Mister Whale wrote:Sony RX100.

Link to NYTimes review.

+1.

I have one and it is an excellent camera. The only problem with it is that it has so any features and functions and is so small that it can be difficult to use. I have missed some good photos because I was fiddling with the camera settings.

And if you don't use those features, why spend so much?

If you do get one you need this book:
Photographer's Guide to the Sony DSC-RX100 by Alexander S. White
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby PaddyMac » Wed Jun 26, 2013 12:52 pm

A photographer who owns a Sony RX100 recently recommended it to me also for a "bring everywhere" camera, but said to wait for the much-rumored RX200.

I would say that we wouldn't be without a DSLR for important shoots.
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby rsw748 » Wed Jun 26, 2013 3:38 pm

I knew I would get great advice from this website and I did. Finally I pulled the trigger on D5100 with today's ebay deal http://www.ebay.com/itm/330896115913?ss ... 1439.l2649

Thanks so much and appreciate all the responses!!
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby BillyG » Wed Jun 26, 2013 4:26 pm

I'm a little late but I also highly recommend the Sony RX-100. It has a superior image sensor to every other point and shoot camera and it also has an excellent lens system and electronics. I travel a lot and nothing beats being able to put a camera in your pocket and have it with you for that magic moment. I rarely use my DSLR any more unless I need a big zoom -- the pictures are that good!

The mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras are also nice but you cannot pocket them...

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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby parsi1 » Wed Jun 26, 2013 4:30 pm

I recently bought Canon s110. It takes nice pictures and videos. It is a small point and shot, but has manual control and slightly larger sensor than a regular point and shot.
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby ohiost90 » Thu Jun 27, 2013 11:32 am

I was a point-n-shoot type of guy for years until recently buying a DSLR. In the 30+ years of owning both film and digital point and shoots, I've never taken as good as pics that I have with my DSLR and a nice 50MM 1.8f. While maybe not be up to Professional standards, I(and the kid's moms) love many of the shoots I have taken. In looking at the Sony recomemmended above, I doubt it would be able to produced the example shoots I have made public on my flicker account with any of its settings and certianly not in "auto". Then again, my DSLR wouldn't had taken these in auto either.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/80123096@N02/with/9135992828/
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby Oilburner » Thu Jun 27, 2013 11:45 am

My wife recently bought me a Cannon EOS Rebel, but it is bulky and not compact. It was supposed to replace my Cannon PowerShot A710IS, but it hasn't. I use the latter mostly for the convenience, portability, ease of use and because it takes great pictures. Here is a review of the
PowerShot:

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canona710is/12

If you can't find its successor new, then you can get a used A710IS for under $200.. It is a fine little camera, which probably will more than meet your needs. If you get one, I suggest getting four lithium ion batteries (takes 2 AA) and a charger and a high capacity data card for it.
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby Ozonewanderer » Thu Jun 27, 2013 12:01 pm

For anyone still interested, here is the just announced 2nd generation SONY RX100 II:
http://reviews.cnet.com/digital-cameras ... 07990.html
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby Mister Whale » Thu Jun 27, 2013 1:31 pm

ohiost90 wrote:In looking at the Sony recomemmended above, I doubt it would be able to produced the example shoots I have made public on my flicker account with any of its settings and certianly not in "auto".


These were all taken with my RX100 -- I'm far from being a pro -- and all are straight jpegs right out of the camera, no adjusting (or cropping) of any sort, all taken under challenging conditions. Click on images for larger versions. :beer

I agree that a contemporary DSLR and good glass will substantially outperform any digital pocket camera ever made in certain criteria under certain conditions.

(Someone please tell me if it's poor form to post this many images, and I'll take them down.)

Image

Image

Image

Image
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby gatorman » Thu Jun 27, 2013 8:13 pm

Mister Whale wrote:
ohiost90 wrote:In looking at the Sony recomemmended above, I doubt it would be able to produced the example shoots I have made public on my flicker account with any of its settings and certianly not in "auto".


These were all taken with my RX100 -- I'm far from being a pro -- and all are straight jpegs right out of the camera, no adjusting (or cropping) of any sort, all taken under challenging conditions. Click on images for larger versions. :beer

I agree that a contemporary DSLR and good glass will substantially outperform any digital pocket camera ever made in certain criteria under certain conditions.

(Someone please tell me if it's poor form to post this many images, and I'll take them down.)

Image

Image

Image

Image


Nice images, I especially like the last two, brings back memories,
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby playtothebeat » Thu Jun 27, 2013 10:11 pm

rsw748 wrote:I knew I would get great advice from this website and I did. Finally I pulled the trigger on D5100 with today's ebay deal http://www.ebay.com/itm/330896115913?ss ... 1439.l2649

Thanks so much and appreciate all the responses!!


You won't regret it, trust me.

After you learn how to use it, you should look into purchasing one of these lenses:

http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-35mm-1-8G-D ... on+35mm+dx
http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-50mm-NIKKOR ... s=nikon+50

I have the 50mm (second of the two links), and absolutely love it. It rarely leaves my camera. I take lots of pictures of people, my dogs, and soon my son!
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby SnapShots » Thu Jun 27, 2013 11:04 pm

rsw748 wrote:- can they be used for next 7,8 years before upgrading


Thanks in advance.


Of course not. Digital cameras keep getting more powerful and smaller. You should be able to get what you needing for $500 or less. There are lots of choices.
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby obgraham » Thu Jun 27, 2013 11:35 pm

- can they be used for next 7,8 years before upgrading...Digital cameras keep getting more powerful and smaller.


Though 7-8 years might be pushing it (these things break too often), it seems to me that the pace of change in cameras has slowed to a trickle, at least for inexpensive ones. No really big changes in the last 2 years. For DSLR's, maybe not so. But I think you can a nice camera now and hope for 5 years out of it.
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby ohiost90 » Fri Jun 28, 2013 9:10 am

Mister Whale wrote:
ohiost90 wrote:In looking at the Sony recomemmended above, I doubt it would be able to produced the example shoots I have made public on my flicker account with any of its settings and certianly not in "auto".


These were all taken with my RX100 -- I'm far from being a pro -- and all are straight jpegs right out of the camera, no adjusting (or cropping) of any sort, all taken under challenging conditions. Click on images for larger versions. :beer

I agree that a contemporary DSLR and good glass will substantially outperform any digital pocket camera ever made in certain criteria under certain conditions.



Let me clarify, I never meant to say that a RX100 couldn't take nice pictures. I was mainly speaking of taking shots in "Auto" with any camera and the ability of creating a narrow depth of field with point and shoots. A DSLR with a nice lens has the ability to produce pictures with a small DOF without being very close to the subject that I don't believe the RX100 has. Its a matter of distance to subject, focal length and aperture. The RX100, while at its min focal length has a 1.8 f-stop, it is rather slow at higher focal lengths. The outdoor shots that I posted, weren't under challenging conditions. It was a nice sunny day making it possible to shoot with a high shutter speed and low ISO. Any camera would produce a nice clear shoot of the subject. However, any camera in Auto, would likely have selected a high f-stop making much of the background as in focus as the subject. This wouldn't allow the subject to "pop" as it does. I can't remember exactly how far I was from the subject, but I'm guessing that I was appx 15 to 20 feet away. When I was shooting p-n-s and in Auto with my DSLR, all of my pics looked the same, The were nice and sharp, but the entire picture was in focus (or nearly so) . Regardless if I wanted it or not.

Your sample pics don't necessary lend themselves to wanting a narrow DOF. Do have any shoots where you are 10~20 feet away from the subject where the background(and foreground) from 1~2 feet behind to infinity is blurred allowing you to highlight your main subject and get rid of any distractions in the background?
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby ohiost90 » Fri Jun 28, 2013 9:12 am

playtothebeat wrote:
rsw748 wrote:I knew I would get great advice from this website and I did. Finally I pulled the trigger on D5100 with today's ebay deal http://www.ebay.com/itm/330896115913?ss ... 1439.l2649

Thanks so much and appreciate all the responses!!


You won't regret it, trust me.

After you learn how to use it, you should look into purchasing one of these lenses:

http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-35mm-1-8G-D ... on+35mm+dx
http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-50mm-NIKKOR ... s=nikon+50

I have the 50mm (second of the two links), and absolutely love it. It rarely leaves my camera. I take lots of pictures of people, my dogs, and soon my son!

Agreed on the 50mm. I have it as well. Doesn't leave my camera very often.
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby Mister Whale » Fri Jun 28, 2013 1:36 pm

ohiost90 wrote:Your sample pics don't necessary lend themselves to wanting a narrow DOF. Do have any shoots where you are 10~20 feet away from the subject where the background(and foreground) from 1~2 feet behind to infinity is blurred allowing you to highlight your main subject and get rid of any distractions in the background?


rsw748 wrote:I'm planning to spend about $500 - $600.


rsw748 wrote:My main complaints about the point and shoots have been their zoom restriction, slowness and quality.


Mister Whale wrote:I agree that a contemporary DSLR and good glass will substantially outperform any digital pocket camera ever made in certain criteria under certain conditions.


:beer
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby rsw748 » Thu Jul 04, 2013 10:17 am

Just wanted to say big THANK YOU for suggesting D5100 for the following bogle heads and all others who spent time in writing to suggest me.

I never wanted to go for a DSLR because of its bulkiness, but after buying D5100 and seeing the quality of the pictures I'm really amazed. I thought I'll be always using the auto mode, but now I'm too much interested in manual photography and even bought a book Nikon D5100: From Snapshots to Great Shots (http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-D5100-Snapshots-Great-Shots/dp/0321793846/ref=cm_lmf_tit_1) which is a really good book for beginners.

THANKS SO MUCH AGAIN!!

playtothebeat » Mon Jun 24, 2013 5:35 pm

If you're taking a lot of pics of your kids, I would say a DSLR is a solid investment. I have a Nikon D5100, which I absolutely love. I only have one after-market (i.e. non-bundled) lens for it, and it's fantastic for portraits and people in general, as it's EXTREMELY quick.
Of course, it is not "compact", so that's something you have to decide on. For me, the flexibility of being able to get multiple lenses is worth it. I can also truly tell that picture quality from this camera (and it's not even a high end DSLR by any means; in fact, it's probably one of the "lower end") has been exponentially better than any non-DSLR i've used in the past.

to answer your question more directly - the Nikon 1 is a good compact (mirrorless) system. I think it can fit in a pocket (with the lens removed). You can buy lenses in the future so it will definitely last you 7-8 years.



JArthur » Mon Jun 24, 2013 5:56 pm

I second the D5100 as a great all around camera as I've been using one for over a year. If you want to use just one lens all of the time then don't bother with the kit lens, but rather I recommend this Sigma lens for a nearly perfect "walk about" lens which will do for 90%+ of everything you will want to shoot. It is the default lens on my camera and I've used it for portraits, vacations, and photography for professional artwork.





pennstater2005 » Mon Jun 24, 2013 10:41 pm

If you are planning on picture taking of your kids when they're in motion go for the dslr camera instead. You can still get in at that price point. Check out the Nikon d5100. Also you'll get much better low light photography.



black jack » Tue Jun 25, 2013 12:04 am

I went through the same process you're facing seven years ago. I'd been using digital point and shoot cameras (Nikon Coolpix 5000 and 8400), and while they worked well, I was frustrated by their poor low-light performance and slow start-up. I bought a Nikon D50, which I'm still using after 7 years. I can turn it on, focus, and take a photo in about a second, and it has pretty good low light performance, even with the kit lens. So it is easy to get a camera that doesn't need upgrading for 7-8 years. As others have said, a Nikon D5100 would be fine, or even a D3100.
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby Watty » Fri Jul 05, 2013 12:37 am

I've been following this thread too and I've been thinking of getting a new camera too.

I just ordered a refurbished Canon T3i with a kit lens for about the same price.

There sure are a lot of factory refurbished cameras out there for multiple brands. I wouldn't think that there would that many warrantee returns.

Does anyone know where they get all of the refurbished cameras from?
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby gatorman » Fri Jul 05, 2013 6:57 pm

Watty wrote:I've been following this thread too and I've been thinking of getting a new camera too.

I just ordered a refurbished Canon T3i with a kit lens for about the same price.

There sure are a lot of factory refurbished cameras out there for multiple brands. I wouldn't think that there would that many warrantee returns.

Does anyone know where they get all of the refurbished cameras from?


I get the impression that the camera makers don't do much, if any, pre-delivery testing, so there are a lot of cameras that are dead on arrival or are subject to early failure. Just what I get from reading various forums, no personal knowledge to back that up.
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby mlipps » Wed Jul 10, 2013 11:21 pm

Just ordered my RX100 from Amazon Warehouse deals, Like New condition, $501. Amazon Warehouse deals are fast becoming my favorite thing. Thanks to all who gave advice in this thread, I really appreciated reading it. I'm buying a nice camera for two upcoming international trips. Although the RX100 is just as expensive as an SLR, it will fit in my purse/front pocket & might be mistaken for a cheaper camera while an SLR never would be, so I'm hoping it will be marginally safer in that respect. *Fingers crossed*.
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Re: digital camera buying advice

Postby mlipps » Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:57 pm

Not to be a total millennial here, but OMG. Love this camera, having so much fun. On the other hand, the charger is missing from the box & it took me a one hour chat with Amazon support to get them to overnight me a replacement, and I have Amazon Prime...grumble. First world problems indeed.
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