Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

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Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Postby Browser » Thu Mar 21, 2013 10:08 pm

I'm away from my condo for 6 months and usually turn off the empty refrigerator. Someone mentioned that a fridge repairman said you should leave the fridge on at the lowest setting instead of turning it off. I'm assuming that this is supposed to keep the fridge in better mechanical condition than letting it sit dormant for months and then turning it on. Anyone know if this is correct advice?
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Postby jsl11 » Thu Mar 21, 2013 10:52 pm

If you do turn it off, be sure to leave the door(s) ajar. Otherwise, mold may take over the unit.
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Recommendation from GE

Postby Sheepdog » Fri Mar 22, 2013 12:01 am

If you are going to be away for more than one month, or are going to place the refrigerator in storage, GE recommends the following:
Remove food, turn off breaker (or fuse) or unplug from wall receptacle.
See your owner's manual for temperature control features for your model.
Turn the temperature control to Off.
Clean the interior with baking soda solution (1 tablespoon baking soda per 1 quart of water).
Wipe dry.
Place an open box of baking soda in the refrigerator or put 2 cups of dry (unused) coffee grounds in a small paper bag and place in the refrigerator.
Important: Leave the doors open.
These last 2 steps are to prevent the formation of food odors, mold and mildew.

If your refrigerator has an icemaker, turn the icemaker off and then turn off the water supply valve to the refrigerator.

Note: If you have a water dispenser model and are going to be away for an extended time, it would be best to drain the reservoir (located behind the meat and vegetable bins). If storing in an unheated space, draining the water tank is a must. If not drained, the water will freeze, causing the tank to rupture and leak when it warms up. The refrigerator's water valve may also need to be removed. If the temperature can reach below freezing, have a qualified servicer drain the water supply system. If you would like to schedule a service appointment, please contact GE Consumer Service or schedule a service appointment on-line
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Postby SimonJester » Fri Mar 22, 2013 2:48 pm

I made the mistake of cleaning out my FIL's firdge after he passed away (removing all food and cleaning it down), I then turn the unit off but left the doors closed. Luckily we caught it two days later and were able to use bleach to clean out the mold that had formed.

What ever you do if you turn off the unit you want to leave the doors open!
"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Postby Toons » Fri Mar 22, 2013 2:51 pm

No doubt , Turn it off , leave the door open :happy
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Postby tyrion » Fri Mar 22, 2013 2:59 pm

For a family getaway cabin (used one or two weekends a month) -

Turn the frigde temp control all the way to off
Unscrew the lightbulb
Shove a towel in fridge and freezer doors to keep them propped open

So far, so good. The fridge looks about 20 years old.
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Postby obgraham » Fri Mar 22, 2013 4:10 pm

tyrion wrote:For a family getaway cabin .

Why not just pull the plug?
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Postby wesleymouch » Fri Mar 22, 2013 4:25 pm

Most newer frigs have an annual electricity cost of circa $55 dollars. Let it run
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Postby tyrion » Fri Mar 22, 2013 4:43 pm

obgraham wrote:
tyrion wrote:For a family getaway cabin .

Why not just pull the plug?


That would require pulling the fridge out to get to the plug. Not terribly difficult, but since the current system works well and there are different families going up it's easiest to stick with the current process.
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Postby Gill » Fri Mar 22, 2013 5:01 pm

wesleymouch wrote:Most newer frigs have an annual electricity cost of circa $55 dollars. Let it run

Less than $5 a month? I find that hard to believe. That would be about 38 kw. where I live.
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Postby Valuethinker » Fri Mar 22, 2013 5:14 pm

MBMiner wrote:
wesleymouch wrote:Most newer frigs have an annual electricity cost of circa $55 dollars. Let it run

Less than $5 a month? I find that hard to believe. That would be about 38 kw. where I live.
Bruce


Bruce

US average electricity price (retail) is 10.5 cents/ kwhr last I checked. In the southern states (not Texas!) it is lower.

A modern fridge, if not too many fancy features, not opened too often, burns arournd 550-700 kwhr pa. (a 1980 fridge around 2000 kwhr). If you are not opening it at all, then indeed you could be at 500 kwhr pa (depending on how hot the house gets, of course!).

Hence the figure of c. $55.

Conversely with 'tiered' rates (Interplanetjanet is your local expert) that they have in California I gather it is possible to pay over 30 cents/ kwhr. I believe Connecticut (and presumably New York City) 22 cents is possible.
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Postby Valuethinker » Fri Mar 22, 2013 5:17 pm

tyrion wrote:For a family getaway cabin (used one or two weekends a month) -

Turn the frigde temp control all the way to off
Unscrew the lightbulb
Shove a towel in fridge and freezer doors to keep them propped open

So far, so good. The fridge looks about 20 years old.


Ahhh.. if it is pre 1992 it is probably burning over 1000kwhr pa. 1200 kwhr pa quite possible.

http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fus ... gw_code=RF

calculator (excel spreadsheet on the right hand side of the page) will tell you just how much IF you have the model number.
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Postby Alex Frakt » Fri Mar 22, 2013 5:27 pm

tyrion wrote:For a family getaway cabin (used one or two weekends a month) -

Turn the frigde temp control all the way to off
Unscrew the lightbulb
Shove a towel in fridge and freezer doors to keep them propped open.

An empty live socket would bother me. A quick check doesn't turn up medium socket base safety caps, but for a couple of bucks you could get a socket to plug adapter and cap that.
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Re: Turn fridge off when gone or leave it running?

Postby tyrion » Fri Mar 22, 2013 5:38 pm

Alex Frakt wrote:
tyrion wrote:For a family getaway cabin (used one or two weekends a month) -

Turn the frigde temp control all the way to off
Unscrew the lightbulb
Shove a towel in fridge and freezer doors to keep them propped open.

An empty live socket would bother me. A quick check doesn't turn up medium socket base safety caps, but for a couple of bucks you could get a socket to plug adapter and cap that.


It's just a few turns until the light goes out. The socket itself isn't exposed.

There are a hundred things I would fix if I could (it's my wife's parents cabin), but the fridge is not high on the list. Uninsulated walls and floors - check. Unwrapped pipes that can (and do) freeze - check. Single pane windows - check. You get the idea.
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