Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

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Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby Ebolav » Fri Jun 08, 2012 12:21 pm

I'm going to make quite a bit this year as an independent contractor, separate from my day job. No taxes are taken out, and my understanding is that if you expect the estimated taxes from the side job to exceed the main job refund amount, you need to prepay estimated taxes. Right? My 1099 gross income will be the equivalent of 25% of my day job income, 20% of my total income.

But, I also read if I got a refund in 2011 (which I did) I'm one-time exempted from doing this for 2012. Am I reading that right?

Thanks for your help!
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby archbish99 » Fri Jun 08, 2012 1:49 pm

Not quite. You're supposed to pay in your taxes over the course of the year, either through withholding or quarterly estimated tax payments. You're then assessed a penalty if it turns out you underestimated your taxes, but there are a number of cases where they consider your underpayment to be "reasonable" and waive the penalty. If you have a W-2 job, you can just increase your withholding to cover the extra taxes rather than also making estimated tax payments. If you normally get a refund (i.e. you should have decreased your withholding), you might be able to leave this alone (i.e. the increase would cancel out the decrease you failed to do).

One of the cases where they waive the penalty is if you paid as much in taxes as you owed last year:
  • If your total tax bill was $5,000 last year, but you paid $6,000, you got a $1,000 refund.
  • This year, you adjusted your withholding so only $5,000 was withheld, but you turn out to owe $8,000. You have to pay the $8,000, but no penalty is due because you paid as much as you had owed the previous year. (Note that this has nothing to do with whether you got a refund the previous year.)
  • The following year, you withhold $7,000, and owe $9,000. You owe a penalty, because $7,000 is less than the $8,000 owed the previous year.
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby Ebolav » Fri Jun 08, 2012 2:02 pm

Wow thanks-I have to read this several times to absorb it (this is far from my area of expertise), and I will respond, I'm sure, with more questions illustrating my 5th grade level of understanding :)
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby BogleNamedSue » Fri Jun 08, 2012 2:18 pm

According to 2011 rules, if your AGI is more than $150K (MFJ) or $75K (single), then you must prepay (through withholdings or estimated quarterly taxes) at least 110% of the total tax owed the previous year to avoid a penalty.

If your AGI is less, or if you are a farmer or fisherman, then the rule is as explained by archbish99 - that is, for most folks, it is enough if you prepay 100% of the tax you owed the previous year, regardless of how much you earn this year.

So, my understanding of the estaimted tax penalty is this: If, for example, I got a 200000% raise this year and sold a million shares of Apple stock for a hefty profit (increasing my AGI to well above $150K and greatly increasing my 2012 tax obligation), I would not owe a penalty so long as I prepaid (through withholdings or quarterly taxes) at least 110% of the paltry tax I owed last year before I struck it rich. That's not to say I wouldn't be facing a hefty tax bill next April, but I wouldn't owe a penalty.

Soure: pages 71-72 of the 2011 form 1040 instructions.
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby scrabbler1 » Fri Jun 08, 2012 2:43 pm

BogleNamedSue wrote:If your AGI is less, or if you are a farmer or fisherman, then the rule is as explained by archbish99 - that is, for most folks, it is enough if you prepay 100% of the tax you owed the previous year, regardless of how much you earn this year.

So, my understanding of the estaimted tax penalty is this: If, for example, I got a 200000% raise this year and sold a million shares of Apple stock for a hefty profit (increasing my AGI to well above $150K and greatly increasing my 2012 tax obligation), I would not owe a penalty so long as I prepaid (through withholdings or quarterly taxes) at least 110% of the paltry tax I owed last year before I struck it rich. That's not to say I wouldn't be facing a hefty tax bill next April, but I wouldn't owe a penalty.

Soure: pages 71-72 of the 2011 form 1040 instructions.


What you described is what happened to me in late 2008. I left my company and liquidated the $300k in company stock I held in the savings plan. I owed a big blob in taxes but all I paid in estimated taxes was enough to exceed my much lower total income tax bill in 2007. In April 2009 I paid the rest of the taxes, no penalty, but a big tax bill nonetheless.
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby Ebolav » Fri Jun 08, 2012 3:06 pm

So, last year I had a total refund of ~$4000, off gross of ~$120,000 of income, filing jointly.

Our income will likely be the same, maybe a few thousand more, similar anticipated refund *if* I didn't have this independent contractor side gig. I expect to make ~ $15,000-20,000 during 2012 at this job. My understanding is this type of income is taxed at 13.3%, correct? So let's assume ~2660 in taxes (20,000 gross).

I'm assuming I'm good then? If I for some unexpected reason made enough where I would have had more than ~4000 in taxes (larger than my 2011 refund) would it trigger then?
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby Ebolav » Fri Jun 08, 2012 3:07 pm

Oh, and I don't want to increase my withholding each check, since the consulting extra income comes sporadically (bimonthly more or less) so our budget relies on my current takehome from my day job...
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby archbish99 » Fri Jun 08, 2012 3:27 pm

Last year's refund doesn't matter -- that's just the difference between your withholding and your taxes. The actual amount of your taxes is what matters here. Your SE income will be taxed at your normal tax bracket (probably 15% or 25%), plus self-employment tax which is in the neighborhood of 13.3%. Think more like 30% in taxes than 13%.

However, with such a large refund, it's highly likely that the same withholding will result in you not owing a penalty this year. Easiest plan would be to put 30% of all your consulting income in a savings account, and do your 2012 return as early as you can. You'll probably owe, so pay that out of the savings account. Next year, do the same thing, but you can just send whatever's in the savings account to the IRS at the end of each quarter.
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby KyleAAA » Fri Jun 08, 2012 3:34 pm

Unless the IRS changed the rules recently, you do qualify for safe harbor since you got a refund last year. I took advantage of the exception back in 2010. But they may have changed the rules since then.
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby archbish99 » Fri Jun 08, 2012 4:46 pm

IRS Publication 17 wrote:Generally, you will not have to pay a penalty for 2011 if any of the following apply.
  • The total of your withholding and estimated tax payments was at least as much as your 2010 tax (or 110% of your 2010 tax if your AGI was more than $150,000, $75,000 if your 2011 filing status is married filing separately) and you paid all required estimated tax payments on time.
  • The tax balance due on your 2011 return is no more than 10% of your total 2011 tax, and you paid all required estimated tax payments on time.
  • Your total 2011 tax minus your withholding and refundable credits is less than $1,000.
  • You did not have a tax liability for 2010 and your 2010 tax year was 12 months.
  • You did not have any withholding taxes and your current year tax less any household employment taxes is less than $1,000.


Nothing there about getting a refund.
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby Muchtolearn » Fri Jun 08, 2012 4:47 pm

OP, you are missing the essence. The fed doesn't care if you got a refund or owed. Look at your tax return. See what the total tax was. It is that amount over which you must pay 100% (or 150% if AGI exceeds the amount listed by other posters). So look at your pay stubs. Calculate how much will be withheld for the year. You can adjust your withholding so that you reach the threshold and don't even have to bother with estimated taxes. If you need to pay estimated taxes for some reason, just figure out the amount and pay it online. I don't bother quarterly. I just do it as a one time event (and admittedly lose out on the 0.01% interest I could be getting on the money).
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby MarkNYC » Fri Jun 08, 2012 5:27 pm

The general rule is not that complicated. To avoid a penalty, you must pay in through withholding and/or estimated payments, the LESSER OF 90% of current year tax or 100%/110% of prior year tax.

BogleNamedSue wrote:According to 2011 rules, if your AGI is more than $150K (MFJ) or $75K (single), then you must prepay (through withholdings or estimated quarterly taxes) at least 110% of the total tax owed the previous year to avoid a penalty.

Slight correction: the AGI threshold for the 110% amount is $150K for both married filing joint AND for filing single. The $75K threshold if for married filing separate.
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby wander » Fri Jun 08, 2012 5:58 pm

From last year Form 1040, look at line 61 to find your total tax. Make sure you pay this year at least equal that amount, and you will be fine.
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby kaneohe » Fri Jun 08, 2012 6:31 pm

BogleNamedSue wrote:
So, my understanding of the estaimted tax penalty is this: If, for example, I got a 200000% raise this year and sold a million shares of Apple stock for a hefty profit (increasing my AGI to well above $150K and greatly increasing my 2012 tax obligation), I would not owe a penalty so long as I prepaid (through withholdings or quarterly taxes) at least 110% of the paltry tax I owed last year before I struck it rich. That's not to say I wouldn't be facing a hefty tax bill next April, but I wouldn't owe a penalty.

Soure: pages 71-72 of the 2011 form 1040 instructions.


I am not sure what you are assuming about last yrs income, but if it was < 150K last yr, I believe you would only have to pay 100% of that
paltry tax, not 110% . I think the 150K threshold refers to last yrs income, not this yrs.......but the wording in the 1040
instructions is a bit ambiguous.
********************************************************************************
"Generally, you will not have to pay a penalty for 2011 if any of the following apply.

The total of your withholding and estimated tax payments was at least as much as your 2010 tax (or 110% of your 2010 tax if your AGI was more than $150,000, $75,000 if your 2011 filing status is married filing separately) and you paid all required estimated tax payments on time.

The tax balance due on your 2011 return is no more than 10% of your total 2011 tax, and you paid all required estimated tax payments on time."
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby Ebolav » Fri Jun 08, 2012 6:57 pm

Muchtolearn wrote:OP, you are missing the essence. The fed doesn't care if you got a refund or owed. Look at your tax return. See what the total tax was. It is that amount over which you must pay 100% (or 150% if AGI exceeds the amount listed by other posters). So look at your pay stubs. Calculate how much will be withheld for the year. You can adjust your withholding so that you reach the threshold and don't even have to bother with estimated taxes. If you need to pay estimated taxes for some reason, just figure out the amount and pay it online. I don't bother quarterly. I just do it as a one time event (and admittedly lose out on the 0.01% interest I could be getting on the money).


I have no doubt I am not getting it, 99% of this is all 100% new to me. I already said I don't want to adjust withholding each check b/c the 'extra' money comes sporadically, not often enough to factor into a monthly budget. I also was under the impression that if the unpaid taxes on my extra income exceeded the amount of my tax burden from last year, I would face penalties for not paying in advance.

My total tax last year was $7791. So I think I understand that IF:
a-I am going to pay at least that much in taxes with my 'regular job' in 2012 (which I should since my raise will have kicked in) then I'm eligible for the safe harbor rule for 2012.
b-If not, I should probably just make prepayment taxes this year to be safe.

I also thought the refund from last year was relevant b/c it showed how much of an anticipated 'cushion' I had for this year, in the sense that I would have ~$4000 of wiggle room with the untaxed extra job; the tax burden on that would 'eat into' that cushion, preventing me from owing and thus facing penalties for not paying in advance...

Again, I know i'm an idiot with this, which is why I'm posting :D
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby Muchtolearn » Fri Jun 08, 2012 7:53 pm

KyleAAA wrote:Unless the IRS changed the rules recently, you do qualify for safe harbor since you got a refund last year. I took advantage of the exception back in 2010. But they may have changed the rules since then.


Kyle, this is wrong FOREVER. It is the actual tax. Believe me.
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby archbish99 » Fri Jun 08, 2012 8:11 pm

Ebolav wrote:My total tax last year was $7791. So I think I understand that IF:
a-I am going to pay at least that much in taxes with my 'regular job' in 2012 (which I should since my raise will have kicked in) then I'm eligible for the safe harbor rule for 2012.
b-If not, I should probably just make prepayment taxes this year to be safe.

I also thought the refund from last year was relevant b/c it showed how much of an anticipated 'cushion' I had for this year, in the sense that I would have ~$4000 of wiggle room with the untaxed extra job; the tax burden on that would 'eat into' that cushion, preventing me from owing and thus facing penalties for not paying in advance...

Correct on both counts. If you keep your withholding the same, the amount you're currently withholding should cushion, but not cover, the extra taxes. You're likely to still owe a little bit, since $20,000 added income at ~30% taxes is an extra $6,000. Set some money aside to cover this. However, given the previous year's taxes were much less, you won't owe a penalty.

In future years, you'll be expected to pay more through the year. If you want to be as close as possible to pay-as-you-go:
  • Reduce your current withholding to cover the non-consulting portion only; this lets you increase your take-home pay rather than giving the government an interest-free loan.
  • Start making quarterly estimated tax payments based on your consulting income.
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby pjstack » Fri Jun 08, 2012 8:39 pm

Ebolav wrote:

My total tax last year was $7791. So I think I understand that IF:
a-I am going to pay at least that much in taxes with my 'regular job' in 2012 (which I should since my raise will have kicked in) then I'm eligible for the safe harbor rule for 2012.
b-If not, I should probably just make prepayment taxes this year to be safe.


Exactly! You got it!
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby Ebolav » Fri Jun 08, 2012 8:50 pm

archbish99 wrote:
Ebolav wrote:My total tax last year was $7791. So I think I understand that IF:
a-I am going to pay at least that much in taxes with my 'regular job' in 2012 (which I should since my raise will have kicked in) then I'm eligible for the safe harbor rule for 2012.
b-If not, I should probably just make prepayment taxes this year to be safe.

I also thought the refund from last year was relevant b/c it showed how much of an anticipated 'cushion' I had for this year, in the sense that I would have ~$4000 of wiggle room with the untaxed extra job; the tax burden on that would 'eat into' that cushion, preventing me from owing and thus facing penalties for not paying in advance...

Correct on both counts. If you keep your withholding the same, the amount you're currently withholding should cushion, but not cover, the extra taxes. You're likely to still owe a little bit, since $20,000 added income at ~30% taxes is an extra $6,000. Set some money aside to cover this. However, given the previous year's taxes were much less, you won't owe a penalty.

In future years, you'll be expected to pay more through the year. If you want to be as close as possible to pay-as-you-go:
  • Reduce your current withholding to cover the non-consulting portion only; this lets you increase your take-home pay rather than giving the government an interest-free loan.
  • Start making quarterly estimated tax payments based on your consulting income.


Even a blind squirrel finds a nut-thanks everyone!!!
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby celia » Fri Jun 08, 2012 9:09 pm

To correct some terminology, you don't need to "prepay" anything. It is expected that appropriate taxes are withheld all year long as income is received. In months/quarters you earn less, you owe less in taxes. In months/quarters you have more taxable income, your withholdings or estimated tax payments should be more.

Since your W-2s don't indicate which month(s) had the earned income (ie, you could have earned it all in the first or last month of the year), the important thing is to have the taxes owed for the year paid by the end of the year, or the following January 15, if filing estimated taxes. If you are short, of course you will pay the difference by April 15. But the easiest way to avoid any penalties is to pay at least as much as you owed the previous year before the current year ends.

I knew someone who was graduating from college and landed a high-paying job the fall before graduation. He received a huge signing bonus in January and they withheld about half of it for taxes. I told him the withholding was calculated by the computer as if he had earned that much every pay period. Even though he didn't start work until mid-summer, the taxes withheld in January covered all his taxes due for the year. Now, that is someone who "prepaid" his taxes! :D
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby Muchtolearn » Fri Jun 08, 2012 9:25 pm

celia wrote:To correct some terminology, you don't need to "prepay" anything. It is expected that appropriate taxes are withheld all year long as income is received. In months/quarters you earn less, you owe less in taxes. In months/quarters you have more taxable income, your withholdings or estimated tax payments should be more.

Since your W-2s don't indicate which month(s) had the earned income (ie, you could have earned it all in the first or last month of the year), the important thing is to have the taxes owed for the year paid by the end of the year, or the following January 15, if filing estimated taxes. If you are short, of course you will pay the difference by April 15. But the easiest way to avoid any penalties is to pay at least as much as you owed the previous year before the current year ends.

I knew someone who was graduating from college and landed a high-paying job the fall before graduation. He received a huge signing bonus in January and they withheld about half of it for taxes. I told him the withholding was calculated by the computer as if he had earned that much every pay period. Even though he didn't start work until mid-summer, the taxes withheld in January covered all his taxes due for the year. Now, that is someone who "prepaid" his taxes! :D


One refinement. If paying estimated taxes, the government "assumes" that all income is earned equally through the year. So they expect quarterly payments on time. I have gotten small penalties for underwithholding based purely on a late quarterly payment. If you look at turbotax on your return you will see how they calculate this. You could fight it by showing when your earnings were made if uneven, however its probably not worth getting involved with the IRS when they assess you.
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby KyleAAA » Fri Jun 08, 2012 9:36 pm

Muchtolearn wrote:
KyleAAA wrote:Unless the IRS changed the rules recently, you do qualify for safe harbor since you got a refund last year. I took advantage of the exception back in 2010. But they may have changed the rules since then.


Kyle, this is wrong FOREVER. It is the actual tax. Believe me.


Are you sure? The IRS language is ambiguous but TurboTax adhered to my interpretation and I have yet to hear from the IRS about it.
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby celia » Fri Jun 08, 2012 10:00 pm

Muchtolearn wrote:One refinement. If paying estimated taxes, the government "assumes" that all income is earned equally through the year. So they expect quarterly payments on time.


I think there are several ways to calculate the under-withholding penalty (at least there used to be). [You can use the way that's favorable to you or let the IRS calculate it.] One of the ways the penalty can be calculated, is to look at how much of the income was received each quarter and calculate the tax that would have been owed up to that time and compare it to what was actually withheld/sent in by that time. This would be the preferred method if all the income was earned in the last quarter, for example. Why should you be penalized for nothing withheld early in the year when your winning lottery ticket didn't show up until December (and your lottery withholdings were almost enough to cover the taxes)?
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby DSInvestor » Fri Jun 08, 2012 11:15 pm

Ebolav wrote:So, last year I had a total refund of ~$4000, off gross of ~$120,000 of income, filing jointly.

Our income will likely be the same, maybe a few thousand more, similar anticipated refund *if* I didn't have this independent contractor side gig. I expect to make ~ $15,000-20,000 during 2012 at this job. My understanding is this type of income is taxed at 13.3%, correct? So let's assume ~2660 in taxes (20,000 gross).

I'm assuming I'm good then? If I for some unexpected reason made enough where I would have had more than ~4000 in taxes (larger than my 2011 refund) would it trigger then?


Your self employed income is subject to Federal/State Income tax and Self Employment Tax. The 13.3% tax rate is for Self Employment Tax only. Make sure you put aside enough to cover Fed/State and Self employment taxes. If you're in the 25% tax bracket Fed, your Fed and Self Employment tax for 20K of self employed income, could be quite a bit larger than 4K.
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby BigFoot48 » Sat Jun 09, 2012 1:02 am

I use, and recommend, the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System for making estimated tax payments. Very easy to use and insures the payments will be made on the scheduled dates. https://www.eftps.com/eftps/
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby JDCPAEsq » Sat Jun 09, 2012 8:09 am

KyleAAA wrote:
Muchtolearn wrote:
KyleAAA wrote:Unless the IRS changed the rules recently, you do qualify for safe harbor since you got a refund last year. I took advantage of the exception back in 2010. But they may have changed the rules since then.


Kyle, this is wrong FOREVER. It is the actual tax. Believe me.


Are you sure? The IRS language is ambiguous but TurboTax adhered to my interpretation and I have yet to hear from the IRS about it.

Yes, Kyle. As was explained earlier, a refund in the prior year has absolutely nothing to do with estimated taxes.
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby sscritic » Sat Jun 09, 2012 8:33 am

KyleAAA wrote:
Muchtolearn wrote:
KyleAAA wrote:Unless the IRS changed the rules recently, you do qualify for safe harbor since you got a refund last year. I took advantage of the exception back in 2010. But they may have changed the rules since then.

Kyle, this is wrong FOREVER. It is the actual tax. Believe me.

Are you sure? The IRS language is ambiguous but TurboTax adhered to my interpretation and I have yet to hear from the IRS about it.

Since you give no details, I will have to make some up for you.

2009 withholding was $14k, tax was $10k, refund was $4k
2010 withholding was $13k, tax was $16k, you owed $3k

Why was there no penalty in 2010? You claim it was because you got a refund in 2009, but what about the rules talked about here? Your 2009 tax was $10k. In 2010, you withheld $13k. Is $13k greater than $10k? Yes. You were in a safe harbor, but not for the reason you think.
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby heyyou » Sat Jun 09, 2012 9:48 am

To clarify, income tax is due after each calendar quarter. There is an interest penalty due the following April, if you did not pay on time for any quarter during the year. The exception to this is discussed above.

Your employer withholds from your paychecks then sends the lump sum in a couple of weeks after the end of each quarter. If you are self employed, you send your estimated tax in after the end of each quarter.

The IRS assumes that you make the same income every quarter so a big income in one quarter is calculated as having that income every quarter. That is why farmers and fishermen are excepted, they get paid once for their annual harvest.

Already mentioned is the 13.3% additional tax on the self employed(SE). That is on top of the personal income tax. For SE, you are paying both halves of the Social Security tax where the employee and employer split that payment.

Reading at Fairmark.com is one source of laymen's language for general tax info.

Learning a little about your taxes is a good investment of your time, as is learning about the fees on your savings. Stating that you are not getting gigged on using some payment schedule with the IRS, is not the same as being in compliance with their rules.
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby sscritic » Sat Jun 09, 2012 11:01 am

heyyou wrote:The IRS assumes that you make the same income every quarter so a big income in one quarter is calculated as having that income every quarter. That is why farmers and fishermen are excepted, they get paid once for their annual harvest.

The IRS doesn't fill out your tax return, you do. The IRS only assumes things if you don't tell them different. When you fill out Form 2210, also fill out Schedule AI (Annualized Income Installment Method) to report the dates of your income, the dates of your withholding, the dates of your estimated payments, etc. See Part II, box C
Your income varied during the year and your penalty is reduced or eliminated when figured using the annualized income installment method. You must figure the penalty using Schedule Al and file Form 2210.

P.S. I think you meant to write the IRS calculates a big lump income as having come 1/4 (not the same income) in every quarter (they aren't really quarters, one is 2 months, two 3, and one 4). If you make $80,000 in one quarter and nothing in every other quarter, they treat it as $20,000 every quarter (not $80,000 every quarter) if you don't tell them the truth.
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby Bongleur » Sat Jun 09, 2012 4:44 pm

Very useful thread.

Are the rules the same for every type of income (wages, self employed, div, int, capital gains) ???

Kind of a drag to have to fork over 15% cap gains right away...
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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby tibbitts » Sat Jun 09, 2012 5:11 pm

I never thought the rules were confusing, but the bottom line is that if you don't need the cash, it no longer particularly matters if you let the government keep extra money during the year. It's not like when mm accounts paid 6%. You can't invest the money because you'll need to pay it pretty soon anyway, so you'd just as may hand the money over sooner rather than later, unless minimizing withholding is your hobby.

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Re: Do I need to prepay estimated taxes this year?

Postby grabiner » Sat Jun 09, 2012 5:32 pm

tibbitts wrote:I never thought the rules were confusing, but the bottom line is that if you don't need the cash, it no longer particularly matters if you let the government keep extra money during the year. It's not like when mm accounts paid 6%. You can't invest the money because you'll need to pay it pretty soon anyway, so you'd just as may hand the money over sooner rather than later, unless minimizing withholding is your hobby.


However, if something goes wrong, it's much better to have the money. If the IRS makes an error or someone files a fraudulent return in your name, you won't get your refund at all until things are straightened out. I have had state tax refunds delayed three times, twice because of the state's error (not crediting some of my payments) and once because of my error (entering a number in an intermediate calculation wrong and computing the right tax but leading the state to bill me for much more than I owed).
David Grabiner
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