First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Have a question about your personal investments? No matter how simple or complex, you can ask it here.

First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby investme » Tue Jul 16, 2013 12:01 am

Hi Everyone, I am new to this site and investing, but have been thinking about it for a while and done lots of research lately with more everyday, but for the most part a complete newbie. I do have both Schwab and Vanguard brokerage accounts.

Emergency funds: Yes
Debt: Mortgage $139,248.07 3.125% 15 year, refinanced 9 months ago
Car: 11,736.59 @ 1.75% 3 year (Just paid down balance and refinanced)
Tax Filing Status:Single
Tax Rate: 28% marginal Federal, 4.63% State
State of Residence: CO
Age: 30
Desired Asset allocation: 80% stocks / 20% bonds
Desired International allocation: 20% of stocks

Above was only a recommendation from Schwab/Vanguard and this site for my age

Current Retirement Assets:
23,727.42 total in FID Freedom K 2050 FFKHX expense ratio .68% via company 403b, managed by Fidelity

Contributions: $13,000 /year (recently adjusted), was about $8,500 before

Company does have a match which is about 6% - only kicks in after 5 years of employment.

I have a 401k with an old employer with 58,065.17

Most of this is the company stock - 63.23%
Rest is as follows:
17.48 % Large Cap
5.45% Mid-cap
5.11% Small Cap
6.39% International
2.26% Bonds

Since the company stock is doing very well I have chosen to leave this account alone, unfortunately I cannot do a "partial" move. Eventually the plan would be to move this to a traditional IRA.

I have another very old account I've let sit in TIAA-CREF stock and equity index with about 3k in it I was thinking of moving over to an IRA - not sure or Roth or Traditional yet.

I also have about 500 shares of the old company stock worth about 26k not in retirement.

Since I feel my income and job is very stable, I was planning on taking at least 10k of emergency fund and putting in the stock market. Vanguard recommends the following:

Vanguard LifeStrategy Growth Fund (VASGX) which is the following:
1 Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund Investor Shares 56.6%
2 Vanguard Total International Stock Index Fund Investor Shares 23.5%
3 Vanguard Total Bond Market II Index Fund Investor Shares* 16.0%
4 Vanguard Total International Bond Index Fund Investors Shares


Main questions:
1) Is contributing that much to my 403b a good idea? Seems from what I've read to max it out at the 17,500 currently allowed. Should I move out of that Target fund? Suggested funds? It appears these are the funds I have available:

ABF LG CAP VAL INV (AAGPX)
08/01/1994
Stock Investments Large Cap 0.97% No additional fees apply.
CNI/C SOC RESP EQ IS (AHSRX)
01/03/2005
Stock Investments Large Cap 0.90% No additional fees apply.
FID CONTRAFUND K (FCNKX)
05/17/1967
Stock Investments Large Cap 0.63% No additional fees apply.
VANGUARD INST INDEX (VINIX)
07/31/1990
Stock Investments Large Cap 0.04% No additional fees apply.
VANG EXT MKT IDX INS (VIEIX)
07/07/1997
Stock Investments Mid-Cap 0.12% No additional fees apply.
ALZGI NFJ SMCPVL IS (PSVIX)
10/01/1991
Stock Investments Small Cap 0.87% No additional fees apply.
FID SMALL CAP GROWTH (FCPGX)
11/03/2004
Stock Investments Small Cap 1.03% Short term trading fees of 1.5% for shares held less than 90 days.
AF EUROPAC GRTH R4 (REREX)
06/07/2002
Stock Investments International 0.85% No additional fees apply.
VANG DEV MKTS ADM (VDMAX)
09/27/2011
Stock Investments International 0.10% No additional fees apply.
FID FREEDOM K 2000 (FFKBX)
07/02/2009
Blended Investments* N/A 0.39% No additional fees apply.
FID FREEDOM K 2005 (FFKVX)
07/02/2009
Blended Investments* N/A 0.46% No additional fees apply.
FID FREEDOM K 2010 (FFKCX)
07/02/2009
Blended Investments* N/A 0.51% No additional fees apply.
FID FREEDOM K 2015 (FKVFX)
07/02/2009
Blended Investments* N/A 0.52% No additional fees apply.
FID FREEDOM K 2020 (FFKDX)
07/02/2009
Blended Investments* N/A 0.55% No additional fees apply.
FID FREEDOM K 2025 (FKTWX)
07/02/2009
Blended Investments* N/A 0.60% No additional fees apply.
FID FREEDOM K 2030 (FFKEX)
07/02/2009
Blended Investments* N/A 0.62% No additional fees apply.
FID FREEDOM K 2035 (FKTHX)
07/02/2009
Blended Investments* N/A 0.66% No additional fees apply.
FID FREEDOM K 2040 (FFKFX)
07/02/2009
Blended Investments* N/A 0.66% No additional fees apply.
FID FREEDOM K 2045 (FFKGX)
07/02/2009
Blended Investments* N/A 0.68% No additional fees apply.
Investments you currently own FID FREEDOM K 2050 (FFKHX)
07/02/2009
Blended Investments* N/A 0.68% No additional fees apply.
FID FREEDOM K 2055 (FDENX)
06/01/2011
Blended Investments* N/A 0.69% No additional fees apply.
FID FREEDOM K INCOME (FFKAX)
07/02/2009
Blended Investments* N/A 0.39% No additional fees apply.
PIMCO TOTAL RETURN P (PTTPX)
04/30/2008
Bond Investments Income 0.56% No additional fees apply.
VANG TOT BD MKT INST (VBTIX)
09/18/1995
Bond Investments Income 0.07% No additional fees apply.
VANG INFL PROT INST (VIPIX)
12/12/2003
Bond Investments Other 0.07% No additional fees apply.
FID SEL MONEY MARKET (FSLXX)
08/30/1985
7 day yield as of
06/30/2013 0.01%
Short-Term Investments N/A 0.30%


2) Suggestions on what to do with the 3k I have in the older account - rollover to a traditional or roth IRA? What funds?
3) Suggestions to invest some of the emergency fund, it's been sitting in the bank for years earning .75% I would like to do something more with it - I'd like to keep half as reserve and invest the other half, willing to take on some risk and plan on 10+ years for at least 10k of it - I cannot see myself needing the money unless I buy another house, in which I can sell some of the company stock I have.

Any help would be greatly appreciated, thanks so much!!

One additional edit: Originally I thought I wanted an 80/20 allocation - but would actually like a more aggressive 90/10 approach for now - unless you think that's a bad idea? Thanks.
Last edited by investme on Thu Jul 25, 2013 11:44 pm, edited 2 times in total.
investme
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby Bob's not my name » Tue Jul 16, 2013 4:22 am

investme wrote:Car: 11,736.59 @ 1.75% 3 year (Just paid down balance and refinanced)
Tax Rate: 28% marginal Federal, 4.63% State I have no reason to doubt this, but most posters get their tax bracket wrong so I'm going to ask: Is your gross income over $110,000?

Contributions: $13,000 /year (recently adjusted), was about $8,500 before Great idea to contribute more

Company does have a match which is about 6% - only kicks in after 5 years of employment. Are you sure there's no match until 5 years or do you mean the match vests annually over 5 years or vests 100% at the five year mark?

I have a 401k with an old employer with 58,065.17 Most of this is the company stock - 63.23%
Since the company stock is doing very well I have chosen to leave this account alone That's a really bad idea
I also have about 500 shares of the old company stock worth about 26k not in retirement. Why? More risk

I have another very old account I've let sit in TIAA-CREF stock and equity index with about 3k in it I was thinking of moving over to an IRA - not sure or Roth or Traditional yet. Traditional. Even on a small amount, I don't see why you'd want to throw away a third of it in taxes. However, if you're really grossing more than $110,000 having a traditional IRA might complicate the back door Roth maneuver for the future. Can you roll it into your new 401k?

Since I feel my income and job is very stable, I was planning on taking at least 10k of emergency fund and putting in the stock market. Instead, start diversifying that $26,000 of company stock. How much is unrealized gain? You should sell it and use the proceeds to pay off the car loan and invest in a tax-efficient stock fund like Vanguard Total International Stock Market. If your emergency fund gives you the jitters contribute $5,500 to a 2013 Roth IRA and invest it in a short term bond fund -- you can withdraw the contributions (but not earnings) at any time without tax or penalty, so it's still an emergency fund but you're building your tax-advantaged accounts.

VANGUARD INST INDEX (VINIX) 0.04% Awesome
VANG EXT MKT IDX INS (VIEIX) 0.12% Awesome
VANG DEV MKTS ADM (VDMAX) 0.10% Awesome. Somebody else like Ducky or pingo will chime in on how you can use this with other Vanguard international funds in your taxable account to have complete international coverage
VANG TOT BD MKT INST (VBTIX) 0.07% Awesome
VANG INFL PROT INST (VIPIX) 0.07% Awesome, but probably not necessary at your age, since your salary is your inflation protection
Bob's not my name
 
Posts: 6945
Joined: Sun Nov 15, 2009 10:24 am

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby investme » Tue Jul 16, 2013 1:20 pm

Thank's so much for your reply! Responses below:

Tax Rate: 28% marginal Federal, 4.63% State I have no reason to doubt this, but most posters get their tax bracket wrong so I'm going to ask: Is your gross income over $110,000?
No it is not, I picked the marginal rate from the government web site, but I will try calculate something more specific. What I contribute to the 403b I guess would put me in the tax bracket under that.

Company does have a match which is about 6% - only kicks in after 5 years of employment. Are you sure there's no match until 5 years or do you mean the match vests annually over 5 years or vests 100% at the five year mark?
Honestly, I'm not sure exactly how it works, I need to ask HR again - they say it begins at 5 percent of pay that’s pension eligible after one to five years of service. Then the balance earns interest based on the annual change in inflation, reported as the consumer price index each October. That change is matched and another 3% is added.

I respect and understand the comments about keeping the old company stock and the risk - but it has consistently performed - I know this is a gamble, but it usually hovers around it's current price and/or gradually increases (decreases like any other stock but usually comes back up), and has split 3-4 times since I acquired it at a discount a few years ago. Why sell a stock that is still growing, except to diversity and reduce the risk? To me it's a risk I'm willing to take considering how it's grown, if there are any signs of decline I could always sell. This probably sounds crazy, and maybe it is - I will definitely keep a closer eye on it, but so far it has been good to me. How do I calculate the unrealized gain? Am I being truly ridiculous?

I have another very old account I've let sit in TIAA-CREF stock and equity index with about 3k in it I was thinking of moving over to an IRA - not sure or Roth or Traditional yet. Traditional. Even on a small amount, I don't see why you'd want to throw away a third of it in taxes. However, if you're really grossing more than $110,000 having a traditional IRA might complicate the back door Roth maneuver for the future. Can you roll it into your new 401k?

Makes sense, my thought process was to have a different type of account since I already have a 403b and future traditional IRA (from old employer which I don't want to rollover yet) - I do see my salary increasing in the years but impossible to say what it will be at retirement. I am not familiar with back door Roth's but still research. I cannot roll it into my new employer account since it's a 403b, but could to the new account I was talking about - however again I feel that company stock is something I should hold onto for now - but at some point realize the gains and/or pick a target goal and then transfer, to be safe. I like the idea below of creating a Roth and putting 5500 in it, then rollover the TIAA-CREF account into a traditional, and when I'm ready my old 401k to maybe that account.

You should sell it and use the proceeds to pay off the car loan and invest in a tax-efficient stock fund like Vanguard Total International Stock Market. If your emergency fund gives you the jitters contribute $5,500 to a 2013 Roth IRA and invest it in a short term bond fund -- you can withdraw the contributions (but not earnings) at any time without tax or penalty, so it's still an emergency fund but you're building your tax-advantaged accounts.
Any thought of funds with longer term earnings in either Schwab or Vanguard? This could be for the Roth or the traditional rollover of the TIAA-CREF account.

I feel 15k in my emergency fund is satisfactory, maybe you'll think I'm crazy (maybe I am) but would like to invest the rest - I hate it sitting in the bank with no interest always being tempted to spend it - I would like to contribute the other half with the thought of maybe auto investing more $$ each month if I have it. I already did paid my car loan down about 20k so would rather put the extra somewhere else. What did you think of those Vanguard funds I posted?

VANGUARD INST INDEX (VINIX) 0.04% Awesome
VANG EXT MKT IDX INS (VIEIX) 0.12% Awesome
VANG DEV MKTS ADM (VDMAX) 0.10% Awesome. Somebody else like Ducky or pingo will chime in on how you can use this with other Vanguard international funds in your taxable account to have complete international coverage
VANG TOT BD MKT INST (VBTIX) 0.07% Awesome
VANG INFL PROT INST (VIPIX) 0.07% Awesome, but probably not necessary at your age, since your salary is your inflation protection


Are these the accounts I should look at instead of the target fund? How can I allocate? EDIT: Just realized this was looking at the Vanguard funds not the Fidelity funds...sorry about that!!

Thanks again!
Last edited by investme on Wed Jul 17, 2013 1:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
investme
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby Bob's not my name » Tue Jul 16, 2013 4:03 pm

I don't have time right now to respond properly on all points (hopefully others will chime in), but on the first:
investme wrote:
Tax Rate: 28% marginal Federal, 4.63% State I have no reason to doubt this, but most posters get their tax bracket wrong so I'm going to ask: Is your gross income over $110,000?
No it is not, I picked the marginal rate from the government web site, but I will try calculate something more specific. What I contribute to the 403b I guess would put me in the tax bracket under that.
Here's a simplistic rendering of your tax return, with illustrative numbers:

$110,000 gross income
- $2,500 pre-tax health, dental, and disability insurance premiums withheld from your pay
- $17,500 maximum 403b contribution
-------------
$90,000 AGI
- $3,900 personal exemption
- $6,100 standard deduction (more if you itemize)
-------------
$80,000 taxable income --> under the 28% bracket with $7,850 of headroom
Bob's not my name
 
Posts: 6945
Joined: Sun Nov 15, 2009 10:24 am

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby Novine » Tue Jul 16, 2013 4:14 pm

"I respect and understand the comments about keeping the old company stock and the risk - but it has consistently performed - I know this is a gamble, but it usually hovers around it's current price and/or gradually increases (decreases like any other stock but usually comes back up), and has split 3-4 times since I acquired it at a discount a few years ago. Why sell a stock that is still growing, except to diversity and reduce the risk? To me it's a risk I'm willing to take considering how it's grown, if there are any signs of decline I could always sell. This probably sounds crazy, and maybe it is - I will definitely keep a closer eye on it, but so far it has been good to me. How do I calculate the unrealized gain? Am I being truly ridiculous?"

Yes. If this was the only stock that had growth potential, you could argue the point that you have to accept the risk to get the gain. But that's not the case. There's plenty of places where you can put those funds to work for you that don't present the same level of risk for you. What's the upside to continuing to hold that much of your retirement in a single company's stock?
Novine
 
Posts: 784
Joined: Mon Nov 17, 2008 10:07 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby widestance » Tue Jul 16, 2013 6:02 pm

Novine wrote:"I respect and understand the comments about keeping the old company stock and the risk - but it has consistently performed - I know this is a gamble, but it usually hovers around it's current price and/or gradually increases (decreases like any other stock but usually comes back up), and has split 3-4 times since I acquired it at a discount a few years ago. Why sell a stock that is still growing, except to diversity and reduce the risk? To me it's a risk I'm willing to take considering how it's grown, if there are any signs of decline I could always sell. This probably sounds crazy, and maybe it is - I will definitely keep a closer eye on it, but so far it has been good to me. How do I calculate the unrealized gain? Am I being truly ridiculous?"

Yes. If this was the only stock that had growth potential, you could argue the point that you have to accept the risk to get the gain. But that's not the case. There's plenty of places where you can put those funds to work for you that don't present the same level of risk for you. What's the upside to continuing to hold that much of your retirement in a single company's stock?


Agreed. I think it would interesting to compare the growth/value of that particular stock versus the growth/value of an index fund that your one stock could be part of. I'd be willing to bet those numbers don't differ that greatly. You could be earning similar returns with much more diversification.
Everybody's got a plan until they get punched in the face - Mike Tyson
User avatar
widestance
 
Posts: 124
Joined: Fri Jun 07, 2013 6:37 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby investme » Tue Jul 16, 2013 8:32 pm

Here's a simplistic rendering of your tax return, with illustrative numbers:

$110,000 gross income
- $2,500 pre-tax health, dental, and disability insurance premiums withheld from your pay
- $17,500 maximum 403b contribution
-------------
$90,000 AGI
- $3,900 personal exemption
- $6,100 standard deduction (more if you itemize)
-------------
$80,000 taxable income --> under the 28% bracket with $7,850 of headroom


Interesting, thank you - I looked at my tax return from Turbo Tax in 2012 and it was a lot less then that

Yes. If this was the only stock that had growth potential, you could argue the point that you have to accept the risk to get the gain. But that's not the case. There's plenty of places where you can put those funds to work for you that don't present the same level of risk for you. What's the upside to continuing to hold that much of your retirement in a single company's stock?


Good points, definitely interesting and giving me ideas and things to think about..I guess the only upside to me was it keeps going up, but I was not thinking bigger picture - if I did take it out how can I determine what funds to invest that would be comparable but more diverse? That's what I'm struggling with - even for my current 403b. Maybe to diversity I keep the taxable stock I have but rollover (sell) the old 401k to a Traditional, and include the TIAA-CREF account, then max out my 403b, then figure out what to do with some of the emergency fund. Thoughts? Thanks!!
investme
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby Bob's not my name » Tue Jul 16, 2013 8:38 pm

investme wrote:I do see my salary increasing in the years but impossible to say what it will be at retirement.
I think your salary will be zero in retirement. :D
Bob's not my name
 
Posts: 6945
Joined: Sun Nov 15, 2009 10:24 am

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby investme » Tue Jul 16, 2013 8:43 pm

Want to double check something:

Single or
head of household
$59,000 or less
a full deduction up to the amount of your contribution limit.
more than $59,000 but less than $69,000
a partial deduction.
$69,000 or more
no deduction.

http://www.irs.gov/Retirement-Plans/201 ... an-at-Work

Is a "modified AGI" your taxable income? If so I may be eligible for a partial deduction - my salary has increased but since I'm putting more into the 403b it should offset.
investme
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby Bob's not my name » Tue Jul 16, 2013 8:49 pm

No, MAGI is AGI adjusted for certain factors, the factors depending on the particular phaseout. In many cases they are the same number. Taxable income is your AGI minus personal exemptions and standard deduction.
Bob's not my name wrote:$110,000 gross income
- $2,500 pre-tax health, dental, and disability insurance premiums withheld from your pay
- $17,500 maximum 403b contribution
-------------
$90,000 AGI
- $3,900 personal exemption
- $6,100 standard deduction (more if you itemize)
-------------
$80,000 taxable income --> under the 28% bracket with $7,850 of headroom
You can reduce your MAGI with 403b contributions and FSA contributions. You can reduce your taxable income with 403b contributions, FSA contributions, and itemized deductions such as charitable donations.
Bob's not my name
 
Posts: 6945
Joined: Sun Nov 15, 2009 10:24 am

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby investme » Tue Jul 16, 2013 9:04 pm

Oh ok, thank you. I found a calculator online, looks like I may be eligible for a partial deductible, but it wouldn't be much.
investme
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby Novine » Tue Jul 16, 2013 9:38 pm

"Good points, definitely interesting and giving me ideas and things to think about..I guess the only upside to me was it keeps going up, but I was not thinking bigger picture - if I did take it out how can I determine what funds to invest that would be comparable but more diverse?"

Any index fund will be more diverse than a single company stock, even Berkshire Hathaway. How well do you understand the concept of asset allocation? Your asset allocation would determine where these funds should go. I'll leave it to others to chime in where best to invest those. But you really need to decide on how you would handle your company stocks and do some rationalizing of your accounts so that others can provide some constructive suggestions on where funds should go.

"I also have about 500 shares of the old company stock worth about 26k not in retirement."

What percentage of your total portfolio does this represent? Having more than double-digit percentage in a single stock would probably be a bad idea. But if you have a strategy to minimize that percentage over time, it's probably OK to hold on to that to avoid the taxes that would come with selling it. However, if you fall into the 15% tax bracket, you can avoid federal capital gains taxes on that. Not knowing your annual income, it's not clear to me whether that would be an option for you or not.
Novine
 
Posts: 784
Joined: Mon Nov 17, 2008 10:07 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby investme » Tue Jul 16, 2013 10:45 pm

Hopefully I did this right:

Taxable
100% old company stock = 500 shares, worth about 26k

Old 401k
63.23% is this company stock, rest is:
9.62% Hartford Capital Appreciation HLS Fund Class IA HIACX 0.67%
7.85% Spartan® 500 Index Fund - Institutional Class FXSIX 0.05%
6.44% Spartan® Extended Market Index Fund - Fidelity Advantage Class FSEVX 0.07%
5.45% American Century Investments Small Cap Value Fund Institutional Class ACVIX 1.25%
5.13% Artisan International Fund Class Investor ARTIX 1.19%
2.28% Loomis Sayles Investment Grade Bond Fund Class Y LSIIX 0.59%

Total is $64,688.93, $57,887.69 vested

Current 403b
100% Fidelity Freedom K® 2050 Fund FFKHX 0.68%

Total is $23,681.17
investme
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby Peter Foley » Tue Jul 16, 2013 11:11 pm

There are two basic choices a do it yourself investor can make. One is to go with an single all inclusive fund where the fund manager does the rebalancing needed, or to pick a group of individual funds which as a whole diversify your investments the way you want. With this latter choice you assume the responsibility of rebalancing periodically to keep your investment mix close to your desired asset allocation. Target Retirement Funds and LifeStrategy funds are two option for the all in one approach. If you go this route it is usually recommended that you go this route exclusively so that you are not making adjustments which offset the adjustments that your all inclusive fund manager is making.

If you do decide to hold on to some of the old company stock, it is advisable to do so in a taxable account where you can potentially tax loss harvest (if it goes down) or cash in periodically and pay the lower long term capital gains rate.
User avatar
Peter Foley
 
Posts: 2270
Joined: Fri Nov 23, 2007 11:34 am
Location: Lake Wobegon

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby investme » Tue Jul 16, 2013 11:56 pm

Peter Foley wrote:There are two basic choices a do it yourself investor can make. One is to go with an single all inclusive fund where the fund manager does the rebalancing needed, or to pick a group of individual funds which as a whole diversify your investments the way you want. With this latter choice you assume the responsibility of rebalancing periodically to keep your investment mix close to your desired asset allocation. Target Retirement Funds and LifeStrategy funds are two option for the all in one approach. If you go this route it is usually recommended that you go this route exclusively so that you are not making adjustments which offset the adjustments that your all inclusive fund manager is making.

If you do decide to hold on to some of the old company stock, it is advisable to do so in a taxable account where you can potentially tax loss harvest (if it goes down) or cash in periodically and pay the lower long term capital gains rate.


That does make sense when I read it..but I struggle with the details. First question would be, is there a big difference between using the target funds or choosing your own funds? For example, I believe the Target 2050 fund I have is 90% stocks and 10% bonds, if I chose to allocate this myself, is there a way to tell or estimate what the difference in returns would be? Which brings me to where I really struggle, with so many funds out there, how do you choose? I like how Vanguard recommended "Vanguard LifeStrategy Growth Fund (VASGX)" based on a questionnaire I filled out for investing 10-14 years, does something exist for retirement? For someone like me without the basic understanding, probably even after all I can read (but will still keep trying), is it best to keep all the retirement funds in the target funds? Definitely need something very basic and easy to understand since this does not come naturally to me at all. Thanks!!
investme
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby Novine » Wed Jul 17, 2013 9:13 am

Before recommending one approach over another, I would ask you if you're willing to put the time and effort into doing it yourself? The DIY approach doesn't have to be that difficult or time-consuming but if you would prefer to stick your funds in a LifeStrategy or Target date fund, that may be the best approach even if that doesn't get you the highest possible return.
Novine
 
Posts: 784
Joined: Mon Nov 17, 2008 10:07 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby investme » Wed Jul 17, 2013 12:19 pm

Novine wrote:Before recommending one approach over another, I would ask you if you're willing to put the time and effort into doing it yourself? The DIY approach doesn't have to be that difficult or time-consuming but if you would prefer to stick your funds in a LifeStrategy or Target date fund, that may be the best approach even if that doesn't get you the highest possible return.


I would like to at least make an effort, recommended reading to get started?
investme
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby Peter Foley » Wed Jul 17, 2013 2:36 pm

investme

Taylor Larimore, one of the boards founders and advisors posted this on another thread earlier today:

Bogleheads:

Vanguard has this article comparing the Target and LifeStrategy funds:

https://personal.vanguard.com/us/conten ... ompare.jsp

Our WIKI has another good comparison:

http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/LifeStra ... ment_Funds

Important: Knowledgeable investors never use the name or date for selecting a fund-of-funds. Instead, select a Target or LifeStrategy fund with its stock/bond allocation similar to your asset-allocation plan.

Best wishes
Taylor
User avatar
Peter Foley
 
Posts: 2270
Joined: Fri Nov 23, 2007 11:34 am
Location: Lake Wobegon

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby investme » Wed Jul 17, 2013 4:32 pm

Thank you, for some reason the url's got cut off, but I found them in his post:

https://personal.vanguard.com/us/content/Funds/FundsVanguardFundsLifeStrategyTargetCompare.jsp

http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/LifeStrategy_Funds_vs_Target_Retirement_Funds

This definitely gives me something else to look at and think about.

I really like how Vanguard has these Life Strategy funds - Fidelity makes it confusing because other than the blended target funds, there are 9 stock, and 3 bond investments options in my company account.

In the stock they do have large cap, mid, small, international, etc.

I think if I wanted to move out of the Fidelity target I'd need to first search a strategy for how to distribute the money between those stock funds, and then within those which make sense for me. It does have two Vanguard funds which have a very low expense ratio:

Vanguard Institutional Index Fund Institutional Share VINIX 0.04%
Vanguard Extended Market Index Fund Institutional Shares VIEIX 0.12%

The other option I was thinking about, but not sure of the effects, is to put the minimum into my 403b for the match, then the rest into Vanguard separately. Issue with that however is I'm not sure how that affects my taxes since with employee it's always before tax. This seems similar to the investing priority post on this site, if I understand correctly.

However, that may prove even more challenging since I will have so many options for funds - but this "Vanguard LifeStrategy Growth Fund (VASGX)" looks good even for retirement. That is one I was planning on putting cash into from my emergency fund.
investme
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby investme » Wed Jul 17, 2013 5:52 pm

What do you guys think about this - moving my company 403b in Fidelity (the 23,727.42) from FID FREEDOM K 2050 (FFKHX) 0.68% to the following:

50% Vanguard Institutional Index Fund Institutional Shares VINIX 0.04% exp ratio
20% Vanguard Extended Market Index Fund Institutional Shares VIEIX .12% exp ratio
20% Vanguard Developed Markets Index Fund Admiral Shares VDMAX 0.1% exp ratio (International)
10% PIMCO Total Return Fund Class P PTTPX 0.56% exp ratio (Bond)

Then I was thinking in my Vanguard account, doing a traditional IRA (rollover from a previous account then contribution) to:
Vanguard LifeStrategy Growth Fund (VASGX) which is:
1 Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund Investor Shares 56.3%
2 Vanguard Total International Stock Index Fund Investor Shares 23.6%
3 Vanguard Total Bond Market II Index Fund Investor Shares* 16.2%
4 Vanguard Total International Bond Index Fund Investors Shares 3.9%

Slowly learning..somewhat..thanks for being patient with me!
investme
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby Savvy » Wed Jul 17, 2013 7:40 pm

Welcome.

If you had $80k in cash would you use all of it to buy that company stock? That's what you're doing?

I wouldn't be able to sleep at night with that exposure.
Savvy
 
Posts: 190
Joined: Sat May 05, 2012 4:09 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby investme » Wed Jul 17, 2013 8:17 pm

Savvy wrote:Welcome.

If you had $80k in cash would you use all of it to buy that company stock? That's what you're doing?

I wouldn't be able to sleep at night with that exposure.


I'm really considering it, putting it that way really puts things into perspective, just difficult since it's increased over 33% since I've had it the last 5..however nothings lasts forever right?
investme
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby Bob's not my name » Wed Jul 17, 2013 8:25 pm

?? Vanguard's Total Stock Market Index Fund increased 43% over the past five years.
Bob's not my name
 
Posts: 6945
Joined: Sun Nov 15, 2009 10:24 am

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby investme » Wed Jul 17, 2013 8:31 pm

Bob's not my name wrote:?? Vanguard's Total Stock Market Index Fund increased 43% over the past five years.


That certainly shows my level of knowledge about all this :happy

Thank you!!
investme
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby investme » Thu Jul 18, 2013 12:11 am

Bob's not my name wrote:?? Vanguard's Total Stock Market Index Fund increased 43% over the past five years.


How do you calculate that number? Not sure whether I am doing this right, but at the Vanguard site, if I do a price change chart for 5 years, VTSMX says 37.49 on the end and the stock says 338.29

If I put the calculation in Schwab, growth of a 10,000 investment, it says 5 Year +345.9%
investme
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby Bob's not my name » Thu Jul 18, 2013 4:06 am

I didn't calculate anything. I just looked at 5-year return: https://personal.vanguard.com/us/funds/ ... INT#tab=1a

Where you start the five years is critical, of course, because the market collapse was 4.5 years ago. You can get a 150% return if you start at the low point.
Bob's not my name
 
Posts: 6945
Joined: Sun Nov 15, 2009 10:24 am

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby sometimesinvestor » Thu Jul 18, 2013 7:21 am

You may very well be aware of this but just in case:

Mistake 2: Rolling Over a 401(k) Plan Laden With Company Stock
Savvy investors often assume that if they leave a former employer, their best bet is to roll the money over into an IRA as soon as possible. Not only does moving the money into an IRA enable them to circumvent the extra layer of administrative costs that may accompany the 401(k), but an IRA also gives them the ability to invest in a much wider range of investment options than are typically found on a 401(k) menu.
However, a rollover to an IRA isn't always the best option, especially if a 401(k) contains a sizable stake in company stock that was amassed with the employee's own pretax contributions and employer-matching contributions. In that instance, it may be better to leave the money behind in the 401(k) and take distributions directly from the account. By leaving the money in place, the investor can take advantage of a special provision in the tax code that enables him to pay ordinary income tax on his cost basis in the shares, but long-term capital gains tax on the appreciation in the shares over and above the cost basis. By rolling money into an IRA, the investor would owe income tax on the whole amount of the distribution.
Of course, rolling a company-stock-laden 401(k) into an IRA isn't always a mistake. If leaving the assets in place in the 401(k) means a woefully underdiversified portfolio and the investor won't be tapping the 401(k) for many years, rolling the assets into the IRA and reducing the company-specific risk is probably the right move.
Source http://news.morningstar.com/articlenet/ ... ?id=602290
User avatar
sometimesinvestor
 
Posts: 889
Joined: Wed May 13, 2009 7:54 am

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby investme » Thu Jul 18, 2013 1:23 pm

sometimesinvestor wrote:You may very well be aware of this but just in case:


I did not know this..thanks for posting..seems I may need to consult a tax professional (which I unfortunately do not have).

If leaving the assets in place in the 401(k) means a woefully underdiversified portfolio and the investor won't be tapping the 401(k) for many years, rolling the assets into the IRA and reducing the company-specific risk is probably the right move.


However, as discussed, this what I have to keep in mind, right?

I found some more information here: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/4-reasons-not-to-roll-over-an-old-401k-2012-12-28

If you have appreciated employer stock in your old 401(k), you might want to roll that stock into a taxable brokerage account rather than into an IRA in order to take advantage of the “net unrealized appreciation” rules.

Here’s why: If you roll the stock into an IRA, all of it will be taxable as ordinary income when you eventually withdraw from the IRA.

But if you roll the stock into a taxable account, only your cost basis (the amount you paid for the shares) will count as a taxable distribution. Any net unrealized appreciation (the amount by which the stock has increased in value while in your 401(k) account) will be taxed as a long-term capital gain rather than ordinary income.


So I would either pay the tax now if I put it into a taxable account as a long-term capital gain (and then re-invest in an IRA), or rollover and pay the taxable amount as ordinary income when I retire, which I understand is more. Wouldn't the 10% early withdraw penalty offset this amount?
investme
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby sometimesinvestor » Fri Jul 19, 2013 7:19 am

So I would either pay the tax now if I put it into a taxable account as a long-term capital gain (and then re-invest in an IRA), or rollover and pay the taxable amount as ordinary income when I retire, which I understand is more. Wouldn't the 10% early withdraw penalty offset this amount?

Yes I think this is anissue so I hope others can advise you.As to the nondiversification isssues I think its the total value of a single stock as a proportion of your investments that counts not the amount in any one account. I think 5-10% is the extreme limit for one stock but others here would put it at less.

We all have in mind an ENRON type problem where many workers had most of their 401k in company stock and as we all know that worked out badly.particularly since there were restrictions/limits on when they could sell.
User avatar
sometimesinvestor
 
Posts: 889
Joined: Wed May 13, 2009 7:54 am

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby pingo » Sun Jul 21, 2013 3:20 am

investme wrote:Hopefully I did this right:

Taxable
100% old company stock = 500 shares, worth about 26k

Old 401k
63.23% is this company stock, rest is:
9.62% Hartford Capital Appreciation HLS Fund Class IA HIACX 0.67%
7.85% Spartan® 500 Index Fund - Institutional Class FXSIX 0.05%
6.44% Spartan® Extended Market Index Fund - Fidelity Advantage Class FSEVX 0.07%
5.45% American Century Investments Small Cap Value Fund Institutional Class ACVIX 1.25%
5.13% Artisan International Fund Class Investor ARTIX 1.19%
2.28% Loomis Sayles Investment Grade Bond Fund Class Y LSIIX 0.59%

Total is $64,688.93, $57,887.69 vested

Current 403b
100% Fidelity Freedom K® 2050 Fund FFKHX 0.68%

Total is $23,681.17


You get an "A" for effort, but when I add it all together, I get 300%. :confused

There's nothing wrong with treating each account as a separate portfolio, but usually you can achieve the same asset allocation with greater simplicity and lower costs by looking at them as if they are one portfolio. Perhaps, if you click this link, you'll see what I mean.

Perhaps you could arrange things so that when all accounts are added together, they equal 100%? I think it may be a good exercise for you. :wink:
pingo
 
Posts: 2043
Joined: Sat Sep 19, 2009 9:24 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby investme » Mon Jul 22, 2013 12:16 am

I may not be the smartest person in the world..but I'd like to think resourceful :D

From the Vanguard site - retirement portfolio

71.2% Large U.S. stocks
13% Mid/Small U.S. stocks
11.5% International stocks
4.3% Bonds

Items asterixed (*) are in new 403b (I moved out of the target plan) - the other funds I would like to rollover to an IRA but need to figure out what to do with the money - with and without the company stock. I would also like to start a ROTH, thinking about putting the 5500 here: Vanguard Target Retirement 2060 Fund (VTTSX, .18% expense ratio) I know it's a target fund but the allocation looks good.

Bonds and bond funds:
1.60% Loomis Sayles Investment Grade Bond Fund Class Y (LSIIX) 0.59% expense ratio
*2.70% Vanguard Total Bond Market Index Fund Institutional Shares (VBTIX) 0.07%

Large domestic stocks & stock funds
46.10% Company stock
*13.40% Vanguard Inst Index Fund Inst VINIX 0.04%
5.80% Fidelity Spartan 500 Index Fund Institutional Class (FXSIX) 0.05%
5.70% Hartford Capital Appreciation HLS Fund Class IA (HIACX) 0.67%
*0.20% Vanguard Extended Mkt Index Inst VIEIX (3%) 0.12%


Mid/small domestic stocks & stock funds
*5.20% Vanguard Extended Mkt Index Inst VIEIX (97%) 0.12%
3.80% American Century Investments Small Cap V ACVIX 1.25%
4.00% Fidelity Spartan Extended Market Index F FSEVX 0.07%


International stocks & stock funds

4.70% Artisan International Fund Class Investo ARTIX 1.19%
1.40% Hartford Capital Appreciation HLS Fund C (20%) HIACX 0.67%
*5.40% Vanguard Devel Markets Idx Admiral VDMAX .10%
investme
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby pingo » Mon Jul 22, 2013 12:49 am

^ Nice work! It's nice to see the breakdown of asset categories like that.

You're almost there, but instead of editing the information to make all accounts equal 100%, you showed us how all funds equal 100% without the accounts. (The asterisks are helpful, but we and you need have an effective visual of what is occurring in each account, still.) So, we need another key part: we need to see the relative size of each account.

I hope you'll keep going me because I'm really not trying spin your wheels. Perhaps, if I give you an example:

Taxable (xx% of the portfolio)
xx% Fund A
xx% Fund B


Old 401k (xx% of the portfolio)
xx% Fund C
xx% Fund D
xx% Fund E, etc.

Current 403b (xx% of the portfolio)
xx% Fund F
xx% Fund G

All accounts equal 100%

P.S. Based on the work you put into the last post, you should be able to reorganize everything back into their respective accounts by merely cutting and pasting the funds with their percents and be done. For extra credit, you could sub-tally the funds within each account to compute the relative size of each account (or divide the dollar amount of each account by the total portfolio size), but it's not as crucial because if the fund percents are accurate we pretty much have what is needed.
pingo
 
Posts: 2043
Joined: Sat Sep 19, 2009 9:24 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby investme » Mon Jul 22, 2013 4:35 pm

I did read the intro post I promise :P

Old 401k (73.2% of the portfolio)
46.10% Company stock - 41,235.88 cost basis $10,530.86
5.80% Fidelity Spartan 500 Index Fund Institutional Class (FXSIX) 0.05% $5,124.61
5.70% Hartford Capital Appreciation HLS Fund Class IA (HIACX) 0.67% $6,303.42
3.80% American Century Investments Small Cap V ACVIX 1.25% $3,356.55
4.00% Fidelity Spartan Extended Market Index F FSEVX 0.07% $3,567.01
4.70% Artisan International Fund Class Investo ARTIX 1.19% $4,191.03
1.40% Hartford Capital Appreciation HLS Fund C (20%) HIACX 0.67%
1.60% Loomis Sayles Investment Grade Bond Fund Class Y (LSIIX) 0.59% expense ratio $1,482.41

New 403b (26.9% of the portfolio)
13.40% Vanguard Inst Index Fund Inst VINIX 0.04% $11,948.44
0.20% Vanguard Extended Mkt Index Inst VIEIX (3%) 0.12%
5.20% Vanguard Extended Mkt Index Inst VIEIX (97%) 0.12% $4,779.36
5.40% Vanguard Devel Markets Idx Admiral VDMAX .10% $4,779.41
2.70% Vanguard Total Bond Market Index Fund Institutional Shares (VBTIX) 0.07% $2,389.70

Old 401k has been sitting about 3 years, would like to figure out what to do with it - with and without the company stock.

New 403b, upping contribution to 17k a year.

Would like to open a Roth IRA and contribute 5,500 lump sum.

Thoughts?

Thanks!
investme
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby pingo » Mon Jul 22, 2013 9:47 pm

^Now I'm just as (or more) confused. It seems like stuff is missing. :confused

investme wrote:I did read the intro post I promise :P


I believe you, friend! It's all so overwhelming at the beginning. There's so much information and noise out there. It's difficult to filter out what is important...at first. That's why were here to help.

1. A few comments/questions:

investme wrote:Old 401k (73.2% of the portfolio)
46.10% Company stock - 41,235.88 cost basis $10,530.86 <--You have also mentioned company stock in Old 401k and $26k company stock in taxable account. Where is the taxable account, or the taxable amount?
5.80% Fidelity Spartan 500 Index Fund Institutional Class (FXSIX) 0.05% $5,124.61
5.70% Hartford Capital Appreciation HLS Fund Class IA (HIACX) 0.67% $6,303.42
3.80% American Century Investments Small Cap V ACVIX 1.25% $3,356.55
4.00% Fidelity Spartan Extended Market Index F FSEVX 0.07% $3,567.01 <--This is a better deal than Ext Mkt at Current 401k.
4.70% Artisan International Fund Class Investo ARTIX 1.19% $4,191.03
1.40% Hartford Capital Appreciation HLS Fund C (20%) HIACX 0.67%
1.60% Loomis Sayles Investment Grade Bond Fund Class Y (LSIIX) 0.59% expense ratio $1,482.41

New 403b (26.9% of the portfolio)
13.40% Vanguard Inst Index Fund Inst VINIX 0.04% $11,948.44
0.20% Vanguard Extended Mkt Index Inst VIEIX (3%) 0.12% <--Why/how is this duplicated?
5.20% Vanguard Extended Mkt Index Inst VIEIX (97%) 0.12% $4,779.36
5.40% Vanguard Devel Markets Idx Admiral VDMAX .10% $4,779.41
2.70% Vanguard Total Bond Market Index Fund Institutional Shares (VBTIX) 0.07% $2,389.70


More on the way...
pingo
 
Posts: 2043
Joined: Sat Sep 19, 2009 9:24 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby pingo » Mon Jul 22, 2013 9:49 pm

2. I printed out this thread in the morning and found some free time today to review it, so let me show what I came up with and you can fill in the blanks and tell me what I got wrong. Forget about the funds for now (we'll put them in afterward, let's just get the accounts right and indicate what percent each account represents in the portfolio:

Taxable @ Vanguard Brokerage
xx% or $ xx,xxx

Taxable @ Schwab Brokerage
xx% or $ xx,xxx

Another Taxable Account? @ Where? Brokerage
xx% or $26,000 <--Old Company Stock - 500 shares, worth about $26k. Did you merely buy this on your own, or as part of an employee purchase plan?? Or is there no third taxable brokerage account, rather this stock is in one of the other brokerages??

Very Old 401k @ Where?
xx% or $3000 <--This is the one with the TIAA-CREF Stock.

Old 401k @ Where?
xx% or $64,688.93 <--I used total amount, rather than vested amount.

Current 403b @ Where?
xx% or $23,681.17

Total of all accounts(*) = 100% or $xxx,xxx

(*That means that if you have any other retirement investment accounts that I've missed or that you didn't mention, it's time to include them because they are part of your portfolio.)
pingo
 
Posts: 2043
Joined: Sat Sep 19, 2009 9:24 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby pingo » Mon Jul 22, 2013 9:50 pm

3. Once we have the table right, then we'll look at funds, so start compiling the list of available funds in the Old 401k (just like you did with the Current 401k). The Old 401k is a large enough part of the portfolio, and it obviously has a few decent choices, that it would be good to check them against current options in case you're better off leaving money there.
pingo
 
Posts: 2043
Joined: Sat Sep 19, 2009 9:24 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby pingo » Mon Jul 22, 2013 9:51 pm

investme wrote:New 403b, upping contribution to 17k a year.

Would like to open a Roth IRA and contribute 5,500 lump sum.


4. Please, prepare a separate table to indicate any/all contributions, if the above isn't complete. Example:

New Annual Contributions
$17,500to 403b <--If you have to choose, it's probably better to save money here than Roth
$x,xxx Employer Match to 403b
$5,500 to Roth
$xx,xxxx to Taxable <--I'm only referring to retirement investment money, not goals/emergency savings.
$x,xxx Other?
---------------------
$xx,xxx Total

The good news is that by the time you're through, you will truly understand what you're doing, why you're doing it, and what you have as a portfolio. It will seem so obvious and simple, it's almost magical. :happy
pingo
 
Posts: 2043
Joined: Sat Sep 19, 2009 9:24 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby investme » Mon Jul 22, 2013 11:50 pm

One step at a time..I like that..hopefully this is correct:

I left out non-retirement and the very old account before, here' the update:

Taxable @ Vanguard Brokerage
2.50% or $ $3,000.00

Taxable at Morgan Stanley (Employee Purchase Plan)
21.80% or $26,488.28

Very Old 401k @ TIAA-CREF
2.4% or $2,916.89

Old 401k @ Fidelity
53.7% or $65,331.18

Current 403b @ Fidelity
19.6% or $23,956.08

Total of all accounts = 100% or $121,692.43

New Annual Contributions
$17,500to 403b (Not sure exactly how match works but will find out tomorrow)

$5,500 to Roth

$x,xxx Other? TBD

$23,000 Total
investme
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: First Timer - Help with retirement and basic investing

Postby investme » Tue Jul 23, 2013 12:10 am

Additional few notes since this isn't mentioned elsewhere:

The 2.50% Taxable @ Vanguard Brokerage is just the Vanguard Prime Money Market Fund VMMXX (I needed it to open account)

The TIAA-CREF accounts:

CREF Equity Index $1,486.50 0.42% expense
CREF Stock $1,430.39 0.49% expense
It does not appear they have ticker symbols, but have performed very well.
+16.6% rate of return for 2012.
+11.5% This year

Old 401k options:

ABF LG CAP VAL INV (AAGPX) 0.97%
AM CENT ULTRA INV (TWCUX) 0.99%
HARTFORD CAP APP IA (HIACX) 0.67%
SPTN 500 INDEX INST (FXSIX) 0.05%
SPTN EXT MKT IDX ADV (FSEVX) 0.07%
AM CENT SMCAPVAL INV (ASVIX) 1.45%
ARTISAN INTL (ARTIX) 1.19%
COL/ACORN INTL Z (ACINX) 0.95%
TRP RETIRE INCOME (TRRIX) 0.57%
TRP RETIREMENT 2005 (TRRFX) 0.59%
TRP RETIREMENT 2010 (TRRAX) 0.61%
TRP RETIREMENT 2015 (TRRGX) 0.66%
TRP RETIREMENT 2020 (TRRBX) 0.70%
TRP RETIREMENT 2025 (TRRHX) 0.73%
TRP RETIREMENT 2030 (TRRCX) 0.75%
TRP RETIREMENT 2035 (TRRJX) 0.77%
TRP RETIREMENT 2040 (TRRDX) 0.78%
TRP RETIREMENT 2045 (TRRKX) 0.78%
TRP RETIREMENT 2050 (TRRMX) 0.78%
TRP RETIREMENT 2055 (TRRNX) 0.78%
AM CENT GOVT BD INV (CPTNX) 0.48%
LOOMIS INV GRD BD Y (LSIIX) 0.59%

If you need the asset classes or any more info let me know. Thanks again for your guidance!!
investme
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:37 pm


Return to Investing - Help with Personal Investments

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: anonymouse, Bing [Bot], BL, tadamsmar, tecmage, theduke, ZiziPB and 86 guests