New to investing, Portfolio Help (TR or VTI) 401k Help

Have a question about your personal investments? No matter how simple or complex, you can ask it here.

New to investing, Portfolio Help (TR or VTI) 401k Help

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:30 am

Age: 28
Married but file separately (this will change since I have a roth ira now right? Do I have to file jointly when it comes to having a roth ira?)
My Tax Bracket is 25%
I would consider myself aggressive. I would even go 0 bond, but I heard that even many aggressive people have 10%
As far as Domestic/Int'l...Whatever you think is best. If it doesn't matter than I would go for domestic.
401k is up to a little over 10k with employer matching 50% of the first 8%
I just joined Vanguard and have $1,100 in the Vanguard 2045 vtivx TR
I plan on maxing out my Roth every year 5,500
For my 401k, I am putting in 8% (166 a paycheck which employer would be then putting in 83) = (4316 I pay a year) ($6,474 combine employer and I)
I plan to retire at 55.

For my Roth IRA
I like the VG 2045 fund (vtivx), but I am open to other suggestions. If not the TR fund, I'd like a small portfolio.

My 401k options are listed here..
.
Which fund do you suggest?

Fund Name
LIFECYCLE FUNDS
Lifecycle 2045 Fund Total Annual Operating Expense 0.46%, Investment Management Fee 0.33%, Other 0.13%, Total Expense per $1000 $4.60
Lifecycle 2050 Fund Total Annual Operating Expense 0.43%, Investment Management Fee 0.34%, Other 0.09%, Total Expense per $1000 $4.30
INDEXED FUNDS
Bond Market Index Fund Total Annual Operating Expense 0.06%, Investment Management Fee 0.01%, Other 0.05%, Total Expense per $1000 $0.60
Balanced Index Fund Total Annual Operating Expense 0.08%, Investment Management Fee 0.02%, Other 0.06%, Total Expense per $1000 $0.80
International Index Fund Total Annual Operating Expense 0.14%, Investment Management Fee 0.05%, Other 0.09%, Total Expense per $1000 $1.40
S&P 500 Index Fund Total Annual Operating Expense 0.05%, Investment Management Fee 0.01%, Other 0.04%, Total Expense per $1000 $0.50
Russell 2000 Index Fund Total Annual Operating Expense 0.07%, Investment Management Fee 0.02%, Other 0.05%, Total Expense per $1000 $0.70
COMPANY STOCK
Boeing Stock Fund Total Annual Operating Expense 0.05%, Investment Management Fee 0.02%, Other 0.03%, Total Expense per $1000 $0.50

Thanks in advance!
[Thread title modified from "New to investing, looking to pick either LC fund or...." --admin LadyGeek]
Last edited by Fieldsy1024 on Wed Feb 27, 2013 6:07 am, edited 5 times in total.
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Sun Feb 24, 2013 12:32 pm

I will also add that I already have an emergency fund and have a 401k. I put in the max that the company matches and that is that.
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby KyleAAA » Sun Feb 24, 2013 12:48 pm

I certainly wouldn't invest in ONLY VTI. If you're going to go the self-directed route, I would suggest the three-fund portfolio:

http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Three-fund_portfolio

Of course, the target retirement fund IS a three-fund portfolio. The benefit of doing it yourself is that you could have slightly lower costs due to using either ETFs or admiral shares depending on how much you have to invest. With only $1000 to invest, I'd just go with the target retirement fund for now. When your balance gets into the $30k-40k range you can consider branching out on your own. Or you can just leave it in the TR fund. It's a fine choice.
KyleAAA
 
Posts: 5456
Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2009 5:35 pm

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Sun Feb 24, 2013 1:02 pm

KyleAAA wrote:I certainly wouldn't invest in ONLY VTI. If you're going to go the self-directed route, I would suggest the three-fund portfolio:

http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Three-fund_portfolio

Of course, the target retirement fund IS a three-fund portfolio. The benefit of doing it yourself is that you could have slightly lower costs due to using either ETFs or admiral shares depending on how much you have to invest. With only $1000 to invest, I'd just go with the target retirement fund for now. When your balance gets into the $30k-40k range you can consider branching out on your own. Or you can just leave it in the TR fund. It's a fine choice.


The only downfall to this is with 3 funds through Sharebuilder, it will cost me 12 dollars each time I want to buy (4 bucks a fund).
I know it is not a lot of money, but it would cost me an extra $96 a year by going this route.

At my age (28), what kind of ratio would you choose if I went with the 3 fund portfolio? What funds would you suggest?

What would be the difference in cost for a TR Fund vs. selecting a few funds doing it yourself? I'd like to find a site that is good at explaining fees and expenses that arrive when cashing out and selling.

I really appreciate your input with this.
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby KyleAAA » Sun Feb 24, 2013 1:23 pm

Fieldsy1024 wrote:The only downfall to this is with 3 funds through Sharebuilder, it will cost me 12 dollars each time I want to buy (4 bucks a fund).
I know it is not a lot of money, but it would cost me an extra $96 a year by going this route.

At my age (28), what kind of ratio would you choose if I went with the 3 fund portfolio? What funds would you suggest?

What would be the difference in cost for a TR Fund vs. selecting a few funds doing it yourself? I'd like to find a site that is good at explaining fees and expenses that arrive when cashing out and selling.

I really appreciate your input with this.


In that case, I would move my Roth IRA away from Sharebuilder. You can buy these funds for free so many other places. Why pay? If you want to use Vanguard funds, move your IRA to Vanguard. There are other good alternatives that will let you buy these funds for free. There's no reason whatsoever to stick with Sharebuilder in this situation.

The exact ratios don't matter so much. If you really don't even know where to start, I would say you should almost certainly go with the target retirement fund. As for fees and expenses when cashing out, that depends on where you hold the account. At Vanguard, there are none. I have no idea what Sharebuilder might charge.

I would recommend you go to the "Getting Started" section of the wiki and start reading. Investing isn't at all complicated, but you do need to do a little homework upfront if you want to avoid big problems later on. Do yourself a favor and just invest in the target retirement fund now. After doing some research, you might want to revisit your decision. But as it stands, it doesn't sound like you have a strong enough grasp on the basics to venture out on your own. And please, move away from Sharebuilder.

http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Getting_Started
KyleAAA
 
Posts: 5456
Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2009 5:35 pm

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby ruralavalon » Sun Feb 24, 2013 1:47 pm

Welcome to the forum :) .

Take a look at this link : Wiki article link: Getting Started .

I agree that you would be better off moving the IRA to Vanguard.

I wouldn't want to suggest a fund choice in the IRA without knowing what you are doing in your 401k, and what your other options are there.

At your age, the most important thing is to keep your savings rate as high as you can comfortably maintain -- viewtopic.php?t=6833&mrr=1291908362 .
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started
User avatar
ruralavalon
 
Posts: 5264
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 10:29 am
Location: Illinois

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Sun Feb 24, 2013 1:50 pm

I don't have 3,000 dollars to sign up for Vanguard. If I just stuck with Vanguard funds, I would only have to pay the annual 20 bucks a month and thats it? Everything else is free if I stick to Vanguard funds?
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby ruralavalon » Sun Feb 24, 2013 1:52 pm

Fieldsy1024 wrote:I don't have 3,000 dollars to sign up for Vanguard. If I just stuck with Vanguard funds, I would only have to pay the annual 20 bucks a month and thats it? Everything else is free if I stick to Vanguard funds?

There are some Vanguard funds which have just $1,000 as the initial minimum investment. Also their ETFs have no initial minimum requirement.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started
User avatar
ruralavalon
 
Posts: 5264
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 10:29 am
Location: Illinois

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Sun Feb 24, 2013 2:01 pm

ruralavalon wrote:Welcome to the forum :) .

Take a look at this link : Wiki article link: Getting Started .

I agree that you would be better off moving the IRA to Vanguard.

I wouldn't want to suggest a fund choice in the IRA without knowing what you are doing in your 401k, and what your other options are there.

At your age, the most important thing is to keep your savings rate as high as you can comfortably maintain -- viewtopic.php?t=6833&mrr=1291908362 .


Hi :)
Thanks for the links...I will check out the Getting Started link now. As far as the other Savings one, I read a book "I will teach you how to be rich...." and that really helped me. I plan on maxing out my Roth IRA. If I have extra income, which choice should I do? Here are some details about me...
Age: 28
House: Loan amount 194k, down to 185k, 3.25%
Credit Card: Usually no more than 600 dollars of debt on it, always pay it off.
Car is paid off
401k with employer matches 50% of the first 8% I throw into it (its at about 12k)
Savings account with Capital One online (was ING, thats why I am at Sharebuilder for now)

Anyways, with extra income after maxing out my IRA...lets say 200 extra a month...would you...
A) Pay house off faster
B) Put money into Savings (Already putting 400 a month into savings a month)
C) Open a Taxable Account

I am assuming letter C is the right choice.

One question....lets just say I spent a year with Sharebuilder and wanted to go to Vanguard after. Can I just move my money over with no problems whatsoever?
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Sun Feb 24, 2013 2:04 pm

ruralavalon wrote:
Fieldsy1024 wrote:I don't have 3,000 dollars to sign up for Vanguard. If I just stuck with Vanguard funds, I would only have to pay the annual 20 bucks a month and thats it? Everything else is free if I stick to Vanguard funds?

There are some Vanguard funds which have just $1,000 as the initial minimum investment. Also their ETFs have no initial minimum requirement.


When I go to sign up and choose the "not sure what funds to pick" I have to deposit 3,000 atleast...

EDIT: I just signed up for vtivx TR 2045 8-) you twisted my arm
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby ruralavalon » Sun Feb 24, 2013 2:37 pm

Fieldsy1024 wrote:401k with employer matches 50% of the first 8% I throw into it (its at about 12k)

I always tell people -- no matter what else you do always be sure to contribute enough to the 401k to get the full match each year. Its free money, you can't beat free money with any type of investment.

Please see : Wiki article link: Prioritizing investments . I would not put accelerating payment on your house as a priority, its only 3.25% and would not be high on my list.
Last edited by ruralavalon on Sun Feb 24, 2013 2:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started
User avatar
ruralavalon
 
Posts: 5264
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 10:29 am
Location: Illinois

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Sun Feb 24, 2013 2:42 pm

I deposited 1100 dollars to Sharebuilder about a week ago. If I withdraw that money (I never bought any funds with it), will I get hit with that 10% penalty?

I always make the company pay as much as they can with my 401k :)
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby ruralavalon » Sun Feb 24, 2013 2:48 pm

Fieldsy1024 wrote:I deposited 1100 dollars to Sharebuilder about a week ago. If I withdraw that money (I never bought any funds with it), will I get hit with that 10% penalty?

I always make the company pay as much as they can with my 401k :)


Contact Vanguard about moving the IRA to them, just call on Monday and they can explain the process much better than I can. We moved to Vanguard years ago, and I just don't recall the details.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started
User avatar
ruralavalon
 
Posts: 5264
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 10:29 am
Location: Illinois

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Sun Feb 24, 2013 2:55 pm

I just withdrew money from sharebuilder while depositing money to Vanguard without transferring. I think Sharebuilder charges something like 75 bucks...
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby Taylor Larimore » Sun Feb 24, 2013 3:12 pm

Fieldsy1024 wrote:I just withdrew money from sharebuilder while depositing money to Vanguard without transferring. I think Sharebuilder charges something like 75 bucks...


Be sure that the money in your Sharebuilder IRA goes into a Vanguard IRA or you may lose your current IRA benefits.. Contact Vanguard's Retirement Unit if you need help.

Best wishes.
Taylor
"Simplicity is the master key to financial success." -- Jack Bogle
User avatar
Taylor Larimore
Advisory Board
 
Posts: 20202
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 8:09 pm
Location: Miami FL

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Sun Feb 24, 2013 3:32 pm

Why do I need to do this? Why can't I just withdraw it in my checking account? I never bought any funds or did anything with it but simply deposit it into the account

Would this be number one of this site?

http://www.dailyfinance.com/2012/05/22/ ... -can-make/

I am not using that money from sharebuilder to deposit into Vanguard. I am using money out of my checking for Vanguard...
This is all really confusing now.
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby pkcrafter » Sun Feb 24, 2013 4:03 pm

No, this is not a rollover, it's a transfer; however, the 60 day rule applies. You must transfer the total amount that was in the IRA to another custodian within 60 days or you will incur the penalty. Sometimes taxes are removed before the check is sent, and if sharebuilder did that you must also include that amount in the check to Vanguard. Call Vanguard and tell them what you did and what your want to do. Once you get this money into a Vanguard IRA, you can purchase a target retirement fund, $1000 minimum. Don't select the fund by date, instead choose by the allocation to stocks. But don't worry about that yet, first get the money into a money market fund inside the IRA account. From there you can transfer to a TR fund when you've had time to discuss and select the right one for you.

Paul
When times are good, investors tend to forget about risk and focus on opportunity. When times are bad, investors tend to forget about opportunity and focus on risk.
pkcrafter
 
Posts: 8352
Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2007 12:19 pm
Location: CA

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Sun Feb 24, 2013 4:15 pm

I created another topic for this since it doesn't apply to the title of this thread.
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Mon Feb 25, 2013 5:46 pm

ruralavalon wrote:Welcome to the forum :) .

Take a look at this link : Wiki article link: Getting Started .

I agree that you would be better off moving the IRA to Vanguard.

I wouldn't want to suggest a fund choice in the IRA without knowing what you are doing in your 401k, and what your other options are there.

At your age, the most important thing is to keep your savings rate as high as you can comfortably maintain -- viewtopic.php?t=6833&mrr=1291908362 .


These two links are very helpful!

Question...
If I chose a TR Fund for lets say 10 years, can I simply choose another TR Fund if I think its too risky/not enough risk
What I am trying to say is...Does it cost money to change funds around if you have an account with Vanguard and you choose Vanguard funds?
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby kenyan » Mon Feb 25, 2013 5:58 pm

Fieldsy1024 wrote:Anyways, with extra income after maxing out my IRA...lets say 200 extra a month...would you...
A) Pay house off faster
B) Put money into Savings (Already putting 400 a month into savings a month)
C) Open a Taxable Account

I am assuming letter C is the right choice.


It does not sound as though you are maxing out your 401k. That should be done before C. Depending upon what B is intended for, the 401k should also come before B (unless you do not have sufficient savings to deal with emergencies such as job loss, major house repairs), and possibly before A as well.
Retirement investing is a marathon.
User avatar
kenyan
 
Posts: 2457
Joined: Thu Jan 13, 2011 12:16 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Mon Feb 25, 2013 6:19 pm

kenyan wrote:
Fieldsy1024 wrote:Anyways, with extra income after maxing out my IRA...lets say 200 extra a month...would you...
A) Pay house off faster
B) Put money into Savings (Already putting 400 a month into savings a month)
C) Open a Taxable Account

I am assuming letter C is the right choice.


It does not sound as though you are maxing out your 401k. That should be done before C. Depending upon what B is intended for, the 401k should also come before B (unless you do not have sufficient savings to deal with emergencies such as job loss, major house repairs), and possibly before A as well.



I heard that you should only put in up to whatever your employer matches on your 401k
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby kenyan » Mon Feb 25, 2013 6:24 pm

Fieldsy1024 wrote:
kenyan wrote:
Fieldsy1024 wrote:Anyways, with extra income after maxing out my IRA...lets say 200 extra a month...would you...
A) Pay house off faster
B) Put money into Savings (Already putting 400 a month into savings a month)
C) Open a Taxable Account

I am assuming letter C is the right choice.


It does not sound as though you are maxing out your 401k. That should be done before C. Depending upon what B is intended for, the 401k should also come before B (unless you do not have sufficient savings to deal with emergencies such as job loss, major house repairs), and possibly before A as well.



I heard that you should only put in up to whatever your employer matches on your 401k


You heard wrong*

:)


*Unless your 401k is a truly awful plan. Truthfully, you may have heard correctly, but whoever provided the advice is wrong.
Retirement investing is a marathon.
User avatar
kenyan
 
Posts: 2457
Joined: Thu Jan 13, 2011 12:16 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby ruralavalon » Mon Feb 25, 2013 6:47 pm

Fieldsy1024 wrote:
kenyan wrote:
Fieldsy1024 wrote:Anyways, with extra income after maxing out my IRA...lets say 200 extra a month...would you...
A) Pay house off faster
B) Put money into Savings (Already putting 400 a month into savings a month)
C) Open a Taxable Account

I am assuming letter C is the right choice.


It does not sound as though you are maxing out your 401k. That should be done before C. Depending upon what B is intended for, the 401k should also come before B (unless you do not have sufficient savings to deal with emergencies such as job loss, major house repairs), and possibly before A as well.



I heard that you should only put in up to whatever your employer matches on your 401k

No. Unless the fund choices offered in the 401k are bad and/or expensive, maxing out the 401k comes before taxable investing.

In general --
1.Company plan (401k, 403b, etc.) up to the company match
2.Pay Off high Interest Debt
3.Roth IRA or deductible Traditional IRA up to maximum contribution limit, depending on personal circumstances and eligibility.
4.Company plan up to maximum contribution limit
5.Taxable Investing
Wiki article link: Prioritizing investments

If you want detailed advice on this, you will have to tell us what is offered (fund names, tickers, expense ratios) in your 401k, your tax rate, etc., please see -- viewtopic.php?t=6212 .
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started
User avatar
ruralavalon
 
Posts: 5264
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 10:29 am
Location: Illinois

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Mon Feb 25, 2013 7:45 pm

401k advice needed, any suggestions would help!

Age: 28
State: Pa
Debt: 185k
Interest Rate on House: 3.25%
Employer pays 50% of the first 8% I put in my 401k
Which fund do you suggest?

Fund Name
LIFECYCLE FUNDS
Lifecycle 2045 Fund Total Annual Operating Expense 0.46%, Investment Management Fee 0.33%, Other 0.13%, Total Expense per $1000 $4.60
Lifecycle 2050 Fund Total Annual Operating Expense 0.43%, Investment Management Fee 0.34%, Other 0.09%, Total Expense per $1000 $4.30
INDEXED FUNDS
Bond Market Index Fund Total Annual Operating Expense 0.06%, Investment Management Fee 0.01%, Other 0.05%, Total Expense per $1000 $0.60
Balanced Index Fund Total Annual Operating Expense 0.08%, Investment Management Fee 0.02%, Other 0.06%, Total Expense per $1000 $0.80
International Index Fund Total Annual Operating Expense 0.14%, Investment Management Fee 0.05%, Other 0.09%, Total Expense per $1000 $1.40
S&P 500 Index Fund Total Annual Operating Expense 0.05%, Investment Management Fee 0.01%, Other 0.04%, Total Expense per $1000 $0.50
Russell 2000 Index Fund Total Annual Operating Expense 0.07%, Investment Management Fee 0.02%, Other 0.05%, Total Expense per $1000 $0.70
COMPANY STOCK
Boeing Stock Fund Total Annual Operating Expense 0.05%, Investment Management Fee 0.02%, Other 0.03%, Total Expense per $1000 $0.50

Right now I have it in the LifeCycle 2050
Last edited by Fieldsy1024 on Tue Feb 26, 2013 2:20 pm, edited 5 times in total.
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby Taylor Larimore » Mon Feb 25, 2013 9:27 pm

fieldsy:
Question...
If I chose a TR Fund for lets say 10 years, can I simply choose another TR Fund if I think its too risky/not enough risk
What I am trying to say is...Does it cost money to change funds around if you have an account with Vanguard and you choose Vanguard funds?

Target funds belong in tax-advantaged accounts. A Vanguard Target Fund in a tax-advantaged account can be exchanged for any other Target Fund in a Vanguard IRA without cost, tax, or penalty.

Knowledgeable investors select a Target fund on the basis of its stock/bond ratio--not on the target date.

Best wishes.
Taylor
"Simplicity is the master key to financial success." -- Jack Bogle
User avatar
Taylor Larimore
Advisory Board
 
Posts: 20202
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 8:09 pm
Location: Miami FL

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby hoppy08520 » Mon Feb 25, 2013 10:30 pm

One strike through and two new words in blue, much better:
Fieldsy1024 wrote:I heard that you should only put in [to the 401(k)] at least up to whatever your employer matches on your 401k
User avatar
hoppy08520
 
Posts: 1613
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2012 11:36 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby Taylor Larimore » Mon Feb 25, 2013 10:42 pm

hoppy08520 wrote:One strike through and two new words in blue, much better:
Fieldsy1024 wrote:I heard that you should only put in [to the 401(k)] at least up to whatever your employer matches on your 401k


Yes. Much better.

Best wishes.
Taylor
"Simplicity is the master key to financial success." -- Jack Bogle
User avatar
Taylor Larimore
Advisory Board
 
Posts: 20202
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 8:09 pm
Location: Miami FL

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby Brian Nametko » Mon Feb 25, 2013 11:39 pm

Fieldsy1024 wrote:Hello, I am 28 years old and just opened up a Roth IRA. For the past month now I have been doing a lot of research on investing and I think I am ready to start.

I plan on maxing out my Roth every year and doing automatic investing. I only have 1,000 to start and I signed up at Sharebuilder.

I'm looking to either go into the Vanguard 2045 fund vtivx or VTI. If I chose VTI instead, would it be wise to just choose that fund, or should I add on 1 or 2 other funds to go with it?

I plan to be a little aggressive since I am 28 and if everything works out I do plan to retire at 55.



Thanks in advance!
[Thread title modified from "New to investing, looking to pick either LC fund or...." --admin LadyGeek]


VTI all the way, make it more then 50% of your portfolio...if you can wait for a bit of a pull back. Don't buy bonds at all. Assuming you're 28 and working, buy a T or a PG to create income. I'd stay away from bonds until we're older. I'm in my mid 20s.

Cheers!

Brian Nametko
As a full disclosure I am long any of the mentioned equities. I am not a registered investment advisor. Do your research before purchasing anything. Don't worry be happy!
Brian Nametko
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2013 11:06 pm

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Tue Feb 26, 2013 11:45 am

Brian Nametko wrote:
Fieldsy1024 wrote:Hello, I am 28 years old and just opened up a Roth IRA. For the past month now I have been doing a lot of research on investing and I think I am ready to start.

I plan on maxing out my Roth every year and doing automatic investing. I only have 1,000 to start and I signed up at Sharebuilder.

I'm looking to either go into the Vanguard 2045 fund vtivx or VTI. If I chose VTI instead, would it be wise to just choose that fund, or should I add on 1 or 2 other funds to go with it?

I plan to be a little aggressive since I am 28 and if everything works out I do plan to retire at 55.



Thanks in advance!
[Thread title modified from "New to investing, looking to pick either LC fund or...." --admin LadyGeek]


VTI all the way, make it more then 50% of your portfolio...if you can wait for a bit of a pull back. Don't buy bonds at all. Assuming you're 28 and working, buy a T or a PG to create income. I'd stay away from bonds until we're older. I'm in my mid 20s.

Cheers!

Brian Nametko


What would you group VTI with if you were me?

Thanks for the feedback
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Tue Feb 26, 2013 11:50 am

Question...

I signed up with the TR 2045. Lets say in a month I realized I wanted to choose my own funds (something like the 3 fund portfolio).
Do I sell my TR 2045 and then buy those 3 funds? Should I buy those 3 funds and not do anything with the TR 2045?
Last edited by Fieldsy1024 on Tue Feb 26, 2013 12:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby kenyan » Tue Feb 26, 2013 11:52 am

Brian Nametko wrote:
VTI all the way, make it more then 50% of your portfolio...if you can wait for a bit of a pull back. Don't buy bonds at all. Assuming you're 28 and working, buy a T or a PG to create income. I'd stay away from bonds until we're older. I'm in my mid 20s.

Cheers!

Brian Nametko


Why own VTI if you know that there is going to be a pull back? I'd rather not lose money. Seems like I should sell my stocks now and jump back in. How much of a pull back do I wait for? 0.5%? 2%? 10%?
Retirement investing is a marathon.
User avatar
kenyan
 
Posts: 2457
Joined: Thu Jan 13, 2011 12:16 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby kenyan » Tue Feb 26, 2013 12:07 pm

kenyan wrote:
Brian Nametko wrote:
VTI all the way, make it more then 50% of your portfolio...if you can wait for a bit of a pull back. Don't buy bonds at all. Assuming you're 28 and working, buy a T or a PG to create income. I'd stay away from bonds until we're older. I'm in my mid 20s.

Cheers!

Brian Nametko


Why own VTI if you know that there is going to be a pull back? I'd rather not lose money. Seems like I should sell my stocks now and jump back in. How much of a pull back do I wait for? 0.5%? 2%? 10%?


In case my rhetoric was abstruse, here's the point -

Eyeballing the growth chart, anyone who purchased VTI between the approximate dates of:

3/2009-10/2009
6/2010-9/2010
9/2011-1/2012
5/2012-2/2013

is still waiting for a pullback, and in some cases is out a LOT of money while waiting. You could greatly expand these dates by recognizing that someone who was waiting for a "dip" would not know exactly how deep of a drop to wait for. Waiting for the market to drop before buying in sounds great, but implementing it is both extremely difficult and potentially hazardous to your long-term financial health.
Retirement investing is a marathon.
User avatar
kenyan
 
Posts: 2457
Joined: Thu Jan 13, 2011 12:16 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby ruralavalon » Tue Feb 26, 2013 12:40 pm

:sharebeer
Fieldsy1024 wrote:Question...

I signed up with the TR 2045. Lets say in a month I realized I wanted to choose my own funds (something like the 3 fund portfolio).
Do I sell my TR 2045 and then buy those 3 funds? Should I buy those 3 funds and not do anything with the TR 2045?

You can change your mind later, and switch if you want to anything you choose.

What are the expense ratios on the target funds and index funds you listed earlier? You can just add that to your prior post using the "edit" button. Its very important to know the expense ratios when you pick funds to invest in. Costs matter a lot. The lower expenses you can get, the higher your net gain will be.

Before picking funds, its very important to decide on the asset allocation you want to have. Your assset allocation helps control the risk you are taking in your investing.

Since you are 28, an asset allocation something like 75/25 stock/bond might be reasonable. Please see : Wiki article link: Asset Allocation ; viewtopic.php?p=538014 ; and viewtopic.php?p=1217243#p1217243 .

For international something in the range of 20 - 40% of total equities might be appropriate. Please see : viewtopic.php?p=98922 ; and https://personal.vanguard.com/pdf/icriecr.pdf .

What asset allocation (stock/bond split; domestic/int'l split) do you want to have?
Last edited by ruralavalon on Tue Feb 26, 2013 6:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started
User avatar
ruralavalon
 
Posts: 5264
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 10:29 am
Location: Illinois

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Tue Feb 26, 2013 1:14 pm

ruralavalon wrote:
Fieldsy1024 wrote:Question...

I signed up with the TR 2045. Lets say in a month I realized I wanted to choose my own funds (something like the 3 fund portfolio).
Do I sell my TR 2045 and then buy those 3 funds? Should I buy those 3 funds and not do anything with the TR 2045?

You can change your mind later, and switch if you want to anything you choose.

What are the expense ratios on the target funds and index funds you listed earlier? You can just add that to your prior post using the "edit" button. Its very important to know the expense ratios when you pick funds to invest in. Costs matter a lot. The lower expenses you can get, the higher your net gain will be.

Before picking funds, its very important to decide on the asset allocation you want to have. Your assset allocation helps control the risk you are taking in your investing.

Since you are 28, an asset allocation something like 75/25 stock/bond might be reasonable. Please see : Wiki article link: Asset Allocation ; viewtopic.php?p=538014 ; and viewtopic.php?p=1217243#p1217243 .

For international something in the range of 20 - 40% of total equities might be appropriate. Please see : viewtopic.php?p=98922 ; and https://personal.vanguard.com/pdf/icriecr.pdf .

What asset allocation (stock/bond split; domestic/int'l split) do you want to have?


I just looked at the cost of each one and also took out a lot of funds I know wouldn't be a good idea for me. Out of the ones listed for my 401k, which one would you go with? I can also split it up if that works too...

I'd like to take a lot of risk if it meant a lot of reward. Bonds to me are not important right now....maybe something like 90%/10% works for me IMO.
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby ruralavalon » Tue Feb 26, 2013 1:31 pm

Fieldsy1024 wrote:I just looked at the cost of each one and also took out a lot of funds I know wouldn't be a good idea for me. Out of the ones listed for my 401k, which one would you go with? I can also split it up if that works too...

I'd like to take a lot of risk if it meant a lot of reward. Bonds to me are not important right now....maybe something like 90%/10% works for me IMO.

I notice you deleted the bond index fund. I don't think you should skip that. If you want 90/10 stocks/bonds and don't want any international investing, then I think you should consider this in your 401k:

10%, Bond index fund,
75%, S&P 500 Index Fund
15%, Russell 2000 Index Fund

A 6:1 mix of S&P 500 and Russell 2000 gives you an approximation of the total domestic stock market : Wiki article link: Approximating Total Stock Market .

I hope that this helps.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started
User avatar
ruralavalon
 
Posts: 5264
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 10:29 am
Location: Illinois

Re: New to investing, Portfolio Help (TR or VTI) 401k Help

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Tue Feb 26, 2013 2:21 pm

Thanks for the feedback.

I have 10k in my 401k...where should I reallocate this money to?

I opened that link up, but didn't understand what the purpose was for that site?
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, Portfolio Help (TR or VTI) 401k Help

Postby ruralavalon » Tue Feb 26, 2013 6:01 pm

Lets back up and try this again :) .

This is a little difficult because your information is scattered over several posts, so I'll summarize a bit here. You are 28 (single? married filing jointly?). You want an aggressive asset allocation, perhaps 90/10 stock/bond. You don't indicate a preferred domestic/international allocation. You have $10,000 in your 401k, the 401k has an employer match "Employer pays 50% of the first 8% I put in", and you have listed the target retirement and index fund options in the 401k, and their expense ratios. You have $1,000 in a new Roth IRA.

The idea here is to have a broadly diversified portfolio (to reduce your risk), which at the same time has low expenses (to increase your net gain). The 2 accounts should be coordinated, to make the best use of the funds available in both accounts. You do have some nice low cost fund choices offered in your 401k, so that makes it a bit easier.

We are getting close here, so don't despair.

How much in dollars do you expect to be able to contribute toward investing each year in the next few years?

What is your marginal tax rate, both federal and state?

If you'll add this data, I'll try to give you comprehensive fund suggestions for both accounts.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started
User avatar
ruralavalon
 
Posts: 5264
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 10:29 am
Location: Illinois

Re: New to investing, Portfolio Help (TR or VTI) 401k Help

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Tue Feb 26, 2013 7:15 pm

ruralavalon wrote:Lets back up and try this again :) .

This is a little difficult because your information is scattered over several posts, so I'll summarize a bit here. You are 28 (single? married filing jointly?). You want an aggressive asset allocation, perhaps 90/10 stock/bond. You don't indicate a preferred domestic/international allocation. You have $10,000 in your 401k, the 401k has an employer match "Employer pays 50% of the first 8% I put in", and you have listed the target retirement and index fund options in the 401k, and their expense ratios. You have $1,000 in a new Roth IRA.

The idea here is to have a broadly diversified portfolio (to reduce your risk), which at the same time has low expenses (to increase your net gain). The 2 accounts should be coordinated, to make the best use of the funds available in both accounts. You do have some nice low cost fund choices offered in your 401k, so that makes it a bit easier.

We are getting close here, so don't despair.

How much in dollars do you expect to be able to contribute toward investing each year in the next few years?

What is your marginal tax rate, both federal and state?

If you'll add this data, I'll try to give you comprehensive fund suggestions for both accounts.


Thanks for helping me with this and I do apologize for being all over the map :)....Anyways
I am 28
Married but file separately (this will change since I have a roth ira now right? Do I have to file jointly when it comes to having a roth ira?)
My Tax Bracket is 25%
I would consider myself aggressive. I would even go 0 bond, but I heard that even many aggressive people have 10%
As far as Domestic/Int'l...Whatever you think is best. If it doesn't matter than I would go for domestic.
401k is up to a little over 10k with employer matching 50% of the first 8%
I just joined Vanguard and have $1,100 in the Vanguard 2045 vtivx TR
I plan on maxing out my Roth every year 5,500
For my 401k, I am putting in 8% (166 a paycheck which employer would be then putting in 83) = (4316 I pay a year) ($6,474 combine employer and I)
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, Portfolio Help (TR or VTI) 401k Help

Postby ruralavalon » Tue Feb 26, 2013 9:14 pm

Background: Age 28, married, 25% tax bracket. Desired Assset allocation: 90/10, with 1/3 of equity in international; which breaks down to 60% domestic equity, 30% international equity, and 10% bonds. There is $10,000 in the 401k, the 401k has an employer match ("Employer pays 50% of the first 8% I put in"), adds $6.5k/yr including match; and $1,100 in a new Roth IRA, to add $5,5k/yr.

Here is one way to go, a 4 fund portfolio similar to the "three fund portfolio", which is broadly diversfied with very low expenses. Because there is no "total stock market" fund in the 401k, it uses the S&P 500 plus the Russell 2000 funds combined as a sustitute. Wiki article link: Approximating Total Stock Market .

His 401k (90% of current portfolio; $10k; adds $6.5k/yr including match)
10%, Bond index fund, er = 0.06%
43%, S&P 500 Index Fund, er = 0.05%
07%, Russell 2000 Index Fund, er = 0.07%, <= S&P 500 & Russell 2000 in about a 6:1 ratio will approximate total stock market
30%, International Index Fund, er = 0.14%

His Roth IRA (10% of current portfolio; $1.1k; to add %5.5k/yr)
10%, Vanguard Total Stock Market ETF (VTI), er= 0.06%

Over time as the Roth IRA with the Total Stock Market fund becomes a larger percentage of the total portfolio, you will need to decrease the percentage of the S&P 500 & Russell 2000 in the 401k, so that the total of the domestic equity funds stays at about 60% in total. Also periodically (say once per year) adjust the percentages of the bond fund and international fund to stay with your desired asset allocation. This is called rebalancing : Wiki article link: Rebalancing .

As mentioned you have some very low-cost index funds offered in your 401k. The advantages the "three fund portfiolio" over the Target Retirement fund are that it gives you: a lower overall expense ratio; and better control over the exact asset allocation you want to have.

Investing priorities should be in this order:
1.Company plan (401k) up to the company match
2.Roth IRA or deductible Traditional IRA up to maximum contribution limit, depending on personal circumstances and eligibility.
3.Company plan up to maximum contribution limit
4.Taxable Investing.
I don't think, with a mortgage note interest rate of 3.25%, that it would be a priority to advance pay the mortgage.

If you file a joint return your spouse can also have an IRA, with another $5.5k/yr contrbution:
http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p590.pdf .

Here is some material for you to read so you can understand more about the idea of a "three fund portfolio": Wiki article link: Three-fund portfolio ; and forum discussion : viewtopic.php?f=10&t=88005&newpost=1506953 .

I hope that this helps.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started
User avatar
ruralavalon
 
Posts: 5264
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 10:29 am
Location: Illinois

Re: New to investing, looking to... [Portfolio- TR Fund or V

Postby pingo » Wed Feb 27, 2013 12:49 am

Edit: My vote is no on using VTI only, although it can be a perfectly valid selection within a well constructed portfolio.

I honestly believe that your employer target funds are low-cost enough that you would be best served by choosing one target fund in your 401k and one target fund in your Roth IRA, even though you have cheaper alternatives. Those target funds are expertly designed and they'll do the work of asset allocation and rebalancing for you.

Ruravalon's excellent suggestion is also expertly designed and the work has been done for you, but there's nothing inferior about using target funds (all else being equal) and it just seems to me like you might benefit from spending more time reading and letting all this investment information settle in your mind.

To appropriate a recent Livesoft quote:

Here, livesoft wrote:I see no reason to have a "perfect portfolio" at this time. An oak tree starts small, has a few leaves, loses them, grows some branches, loses those, too, and gets big over time.


Of course, once you've spent enough time on this forum, you're bound to switch to the lower ER funds. :D
Last edited by pingo on Wed Feb 27, 2013 7:58 am, edited 5 times in total.
pingo
 
Posts: 2087
Joined: Sat Sep 19, 2009 8:24 pm

Re: New to investing, Portfolio Help (TR or VTI) 401k Help

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Wed Feb 27, 2013 6:03 am

@ruralavalon: You think I should just invest in the VTI for my Roth IRA? If this isn't what you meant then I am sorry I am a bit confused.

I already am invested in the VG 2045 TR fund for my Roth. I like the TR fund, because it does a lot of work for you. I'm not a lazy person, but it does sound nice these TR funds.

I do like the suggestion for the 401k.

Here are my questions...
1. Why should I choose the VTI fund over the 2045 TR
2. Where should I reallocate my 10k (401k money) to? Should I spread it out percentage wise how my funds are spread out?
3. Married but file separately (this will change since I have a roth ira now right? Do I have to file jointly when it comes to having a roth ira?)
4. For my 401k, how often should I fix the funds and how can I tell if one fund is out growing the other funds?
Thanks rural/pingo
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, Portfolio Help (TR or VTI) 401k Help

Postby ruralavalon » Wed Feb 27, 2013 9:10 am

If you want to use the TR 2045 fund in the IRA, then its best to just use the similar TR fund in the 401k. The advantage to TR funds over other funds is their ultra-simplicity and hands-off rebalancing, you lose that advantage if you also use regular index funds which will still have to be rebalanced. There is little to no advantage to using a TR fund in one account and using a mixture of funds in another account.

Filing requirements for using a Roth IRA? Here is the rule from IRS Pub 590:

"Can You Contribute to a Roth IRA?
Generally, you can contribute to a Roth IRA if you have taxable compensation (defined later) and your modified AGI (defined later) is less than:
•$183,000 for married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er),
•$125,000 for single, head of household, or married filing separately and you did not live with your spouse at any time during the year, and
•$10,000 for married filing separately and you lived with your spouse at any time during the year."
http://www.irs.gov/publications/p590/ch ... 1000230975 .
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started
User avatar
ruralavalon
 
Posts: 5264
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 10:29 am
Location: Illinois

Re: New to investing, Portfolio Help (TR or VTI) 401k Help

Postby pingo » Wed Feb 27, 2013 8:32 pm

Edited.

The following analogy comes to mind (probably because I'm hungry):

Sometimes we think that this kind of decision is like choosing between oatmeal or cornflakes for breakfast. However, the specific options you ask about are more like choosing between a complete, balanced meal (*Target Funds*) or dry cornflakes with no milk (*VTI*). Personally, I prefer to have cornflakes with milk, strawberries and perhaps some eggs or other protein to balance out the nutritional value of the meal.

So...

1. By purchasing a target fund in one account and then VTI/LC in the other account, it's as if someone offers you a tray of eggs, milk, cornflakes and strawberries (target fund) and then you also grab a second tray just to dump dry conflakes on it. Meh.

2. By using a target fund in both accounts, each tray is pre-arranged to be complete, with balanced helpings of eggs, milk, cornflakes and strawberries. «¡Buen provecho!»

3. Ruravalon proposed you put eggs on one tray and then your cornflakes, milk and strawberries on the second tray. The total amount of eggs, flakes, milk and strawberries is the same as option 2. The difference is in the cost of the meal and food placement.

My idea was to grab the pre-arranged trays that are nutritionally balanced a la number 2 (a target fund in each account). Once you gain a comfortable understanding of how to make a balanced breakfast, number 3 helps you do the food prep yourself in order to save a few bucks. :D
Last edited by pingo on Wed Mar 06, 2013 6:18 pm, edited 33 times in total.
pingo
 
Posts: 2087
Joined: Sat Sep 19, 2009 8:24 pm

Re: New to investing, Portfolio Help (TR or VTI) 401k Help

Postby Fieldsy1024 » Thu Feb 28, 2013 6:47 am

pingo wrote:In weighing Target Retirement fund(s) versus VTI, or a TR fund versus large caps, or which fund(s) to choose for which account...the following analogy comes to mind (probably because I'm hungry):

When you originally asked "TR or VTI?", you may have thought your fund options were like choosing between oatmeal or cornflakes for breakfast. However, the options you asked about are more like choosing between a complete, balanced meal (*Target Funds*) or dry cornflakes with no milk (*VTI*). Personally, I would prefer to have my cornflakes with milk, strawberries and maybe even some eggs or other protein to balance out the nutritional value of the meal.

So...

1. By purchasing a target fund in one account and then VTI/LC in the other account, it's as if someone offers you a tray of eggs, milk, cornflakes and strawberries (target fund) and then you grab a second tray just to dump dry conflakes on it (VTI or other LC fund). Meh.

2. By using target funds in both accounts, someone has arranged each tray to offer complete, balanced helpings of eggs, milk, cornflakes and strawberries. «¡Buen provecho!»

3. Ruravalon proposed you put one large helping of eggs on one tray and then a large bowl of cornflakes, milk and strawberries on the second tray. The total amount of eggs, flakes, milk and strawberries are no different than option 2. The difference is in the cost of the meal and food placement.

My idea was to grab the pre-arranged and balanced nutrients (a target fund in each account) a la number 2. Once you gain a comfortable understanding of what makes a balanced breakfast, number 3 helps you to do the food prep yourself in order to save a few bucks. :D


I like option 2 for now :)

Now I am hungry for breakfast.......but I want bacon :)

thanks
Fieldsy1024
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:23 am

Re: New to investing, Portfolio Help (TR or VTI) 401k Help

Postby neophyte » Thu Feb 28, 2013 7:42 am

pingo wrote:In weighing Target Retirement fund(s) versus VTI, or a TR fund versus large caps, or which fund(s) to choose for which account...the following analogy comes to mind (probably because I'm hungry):

When you originally asked "TR or VTI?", you may have thought your fund options were like choosing between oatmeal or cornflakes for breakfast. However, the options you asked about are more like choosing between a complete, balanced meal (*Target Funds*) or dry cornflakes with no milk (*VTI*). Personally, I would prefer to have my cornflakes with milk, strawberries and maybe even some eggs or other protein to balance out the nutritional value of the meal.

So...

1. By purchasing a target fund in one account and then VTI/LC in the other account, it's as if someone offers you a tray of eggs, milk, cornflakes and strawberries (target fund) and then you grab a second tray just to dump dry conflakes on it (VTI or other LC fund). Meh.

2. By using target funds in both accounts, someone has arranged each tray to offer complete, balanced helpings of eggs, milk, cornflakes and strawberries. «¡Buen provecho!»

3. Ruravalon proposed you put one large helping of eggs on one tray and then a large bowl of cornflakes, milk and strawberries on the second tray. The total amount of eggs, flakes, milk and strawberries are no different than option 2. The difference is in the cost of the meal and food placement.

My idea was to grab the pre-arranged and balanced nutrients (a target fund in each account) a la number 2. Once you gain a comfortable understanding of what makes a balanced breakfast, number 3 helps you to do the food prep yourself in order to save a few bucks. :D



This is a really great depiction. Thank you for this.
neophyte
 
Posts: 35
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2013 10:08 pm

Re: New to investing, Portfolio Help (TR or VTI) 401k Help

Postby pingo » Thu Feb 28, 2013 11:04 am

^ Glad it was helpful.

Fieldsy1024 wrote:I want bacon :)


Me, too!

In fact, there's just the right amount of bacon on the tray. It's nice to know your 401k leaves out the lard (high fees).

Okay, that was a bit much.

:beer
pingo
 
Posts: 2087
Joined: Sat Sep 19, 2009 8:24 pm


Return to Investing - Help with Personal Investments

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Johm221122 and 34 guests